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Filipino sense of shame
By mlq3 Posted in Daily Dose on April 7, 2006 88 Comments 3 min read
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Fallout from the New York Times editorial continues: Bunye says NY Times buying opposition lies and the Philippine ambassador to the UN writes a letter: RP envoy refutes New York Times editorial: Invites NYT editors: “Visit the Philippines“. The problem is, the NYT reporters have been here. During the lead up to the state of national emergency in particular. More coverage: Officials rebuff NY Times editorial and New York Times under opposition influence? I don’t know what’s sillier: the government line, or Philippine media asking the US Ambassador to comment. Definitely, the Palace was more than irked: Jove Francisco describes how it went into full counter-offensive mode for the evening news. He says he smells fear: and if pundits have pointed out Filipinos are rueful that we don’t have a king to intervene, he asks: what if Uncle Sam is still king?

Thaksin is still the talk of the town: the Inquirer editorial suggests the fall of Thaksin signals an ongoing redefinition of democracy world-wide. Amando Doronila says one primary lesson from the Thais is that people power failed. Dan Mariano wonders if the Thai experience isn’t a bonus for the parliamentary cause. The Manila Times reports Thai media doubt Thaksin’s motives for stepping down.

Also, Michael Tan discusses the Filipino concept of shame.

In amendments news: Cops hose down anti-Charter change demonstration. As a result, Palace playing bad cop to Supreme Court’s good cop? Palace wary of ruling on CPR.

Curious story of the day: JdV says he will be ‘last Mohican” in PM race. The real story within this story, though, is the counter-preparation for Senators fanning out around the country to campaign against amendments.

Malaya says, P1.6B poll modernization fund seen fueling GMA’s Cha-cha train while the Daily Tribune discusses Funding the Cha-cha Express.

The PCIJ blog has two former Constitutional Commission members offering contrasting views on amendments.

On the economic front: Inquirer reports, ADB cites factors stunting RP growth; Warning: Don’t rely on OFW money while the Manila Times says RP economic takeoff in near term ruled out.

Is it just me, or between the Asian Development Bank and the New York Times, are foreign observers suddenly chipping away at all the administration propaganda lines?

In other news: PCGG gives up on Marcos’s P850M. It used to be that once bypassed, presidents would change failed cabinet nominees. Now, no longer: President to salvage CA rejects in Cabinet

The origin of EDSA remembered. And New species of parrot, mouse found in Camiguin.

An interesting piece: what Americans can learn from the impending fall of Italian PM Sylvio Berlusconi.

In the blogosphere, ExpectoRants has interesting thoughts on linking, journalists who blog, and political minorities and majorities and factions.

Red’s Herring on how attitudes towards constitutionalism aren’t keeping up with how democracy has evolved.

Ed Driscoll discusses blogging and the workplace: the rules are fuzzy.

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  1. …the Philippine ambassador to the UN writes a letter: RP envoy refutes New York Times editorial: Invites NYT editors: ‘Visit the Philippines’. The problem is, the NYT reporters have been here. During the lead up to the state of national emergency in particular.

    lauro baja, jr. should come and visit his homeland and breathe the air of “freedom” for himself. take a tour of mendiola, for starters, and get a ringside view of authorities dousing off the “heat” of the situation. i likewise suggest for him not to use dark glasses…anyway, we’re in “dark days” already.

  2. The Inquirer editorial reflects views similar to mine as far as the role of the minority is concerned. However, when it states that…

    Peaceful, public demonstrations were the 20th century’s answer to the riots and violent insurrections that characterized the 18th and 19th centuries.

    …the editorial is taking a historical short-cut. The immediate answer offered by politicians to the riots and violent insurrections of that time was the right to vote. It was introduced in France precisely because…

    [while]“the vote represented a new right of the people…it also restricted its participation in politics to this particular and comparatively harmless form”[source: A. Hirschmann, Shifting Involvements]

    Of course, political expression through the vote has its limits, so there has to be room for other peaceful means.

  3. Good artice on Shame and Guilt.

    What i have observed is Shame here is not used.

    When Families steal of others and then take the Higher Ground “How dare you accuse me of stealling from you..”

    The shame is they are ashamed of being accused or found to be guilty whereas in the Korean and Japanese cultures it is the shame of the act, as in the golfing incident.

    The other thing is that no one has any idea that throwing around accusations “Unfounded” does not shame them, and they feel no guilt in doing so.

    It is the same on both sides of the Political and show viz arena here, and they probably have stolen it from show biz since there are many from show-biz circles now in politics.
    And if you look at the ABS line up of presenters most are connected to someone in politics.

    This also explains why the senators and others like to stand infront of the TV cameras, It is part of the Biz..

    Also the Senators having to get votes from across the entire country need to be seen to be active in some form or another.

    On the check and Balance issue of the senate, Yes there does need to be some form of check and balance but notice the second word, BALANCE..

    If we look at Biazon on the “Crisis” in the fort, he was not spouting political ideas, reving up peoples hearts and minds, for or against. He was there to provide some balance and tone down the situation if it went any further than a parade of men wanting answers from their commander.

    Notice the word BALANCE.. again.

    How many laws did the senate pass last year 4…

    How many are really required, Many of them, i heard a number like 200 were passed on for review..

    Housing, hospitals, yes some may see to be for certain areas and provinces, but remember this is where the Congressmen come from it is their duty to provide to their people from their provinces. The senate is meant to counter this with country wide laws and proposals, but what did we get from their efforts last year 4…

    This is the reason why the congress is pissed with the senators. In a single house more laws would be passed and things will even out as the smaller groups will gang up against the larger ones to get a fair hearing.

    Some laws are annoyingly small and stupid like name changes of roads, Fine Decline them and Pass the ones that matter. If a road name change is with a hospital what is more important? The Hospital?

    In the court system they have a thing called the scales of justice, think of this in the senate, weigh up the pros vs the cons if the cons are outweighed by the pros go for it, don’t bother rewriting the law to exclude the road name change it costs more in lives lost by not having hospitals and schools…

  4. Re. #2

    “Always remember the New York Times was the employer of Jayson Blair.”

    so?

  5. To jumper he made up and fabricated stories..

    And Editorials do not come under the basis of facts, just a opinion of the editor..

  6. sleeping,

    “This is the reason why the congress is pissed with the senators. In a single house more laws would be passed and things will even out as the smaller groups will gang up against the larger ones to get a fair hearing.”

    even if the senate passes ZERO laws, if all they ever did was provide checks and balances to the (abuses of the) congress, then they’d hell as already earned their right to exist!

  7. sleeping,

    “To jumper he made up and fabricated stories..”

    so? what has that got to do with the NY Times?

    “And Editorials do not come under the basis of facts, just a opinion of the editor..”

    nobody’s arguing with you on this point, dude. nobody is saying that editorials can be used as facts (or bases for facts).

    but editorials are based on facts.

  8. Ok you pay them i don’t think i should have to pay for an organization which has not provided anything for the country in the last year.Except TV air time..

    And we should abolish the Congress as well and have no government.. Thats what your proposing..

    No laws..cool we can then go out and abuse and kill the minorities like they in the senate are doing now..with out passing the hospitals and schools..

  9. I dont know but it seems that the brouhaha caused by the NY Times editorial among the pros and the antis shows that we’re still a colony, and Uncle Sam is indeed king. The Times editorial hasnt said anything new that hasnt been said in the local media and probably in the Asian media. So the NYT wrote a scathing article. Why is everyone giving such a fuss? The Times probably just wrote that article as a dig at their primary target, G.W. Bush and couldnt care less about what happens here anyway.

  10. Jeg, I think that what was written in that NYT editorial is a big deal. Who reads the paper? How many?

    And since it is widely regarded as “respectable”, people’s perception of the Gloria Arroyo will be influened by it.

  11. Jeg, I think that what was written in that NYT editorial is a big deal. Who reads the paper? How many?

    Americans read it. Mostly Americans. Why does its editorial carry more weight than the PDI’s editorial saying the same thing? Why is everybody praising the Times’s editorial? Do our views have to be validated by Americans?

  12. Granted you’re right (you missed mentioning decision makers, and business people from almost all countries who keeps tab on what’s happening in the US).

    I think that, to them, the NYT is more credible than our local papers.

    For us Filipinos, we don’t have to be affected or influenced by what they think, but we can view it as it is, how they view what’s happening to Gloria, and the Philippines.

  13. I see where youre coming from, Jon Mariano and I agree. The US is after all the most powerful nation on earth. But the NY Times influencing Bush’s policies towards us? I doubt it. Like I said, the editorial was probably a dig at GW.

    I just feel that with all the fuss, para tayong nagsusumbong kay Kuya Sam. 😀

  14. “…that throwing around accusations “Unfounded” does not shame them, and they feel no guilt in doing so.”

    yeah right. Election rigging was unfounded. It’s a figment of imagination of destabilizers and 80% of Filipinos. Shameless Senators, shameless Filipinos.

    “…why the senators and others like to stand infront of the TV cameras, It is part of the Biz..”

    Yeah, Pimentel or Lacson or Escudero faces the camera because they badly need attention, it’s all about showbiz and paporma. As for GMA, well, she’s just doing her job and the Filipino people should learn of her tireless efforts to bring economic progress for the Filipinos especially the poor. Yeah Shameless senators. GMA is great.

    “How many laws did the senate pass last year 4…”

    Yeah, they should produce at least 400 or 4,000, whatever. The more the better. As for the fertilizer scam, Garci tapes, that’s the job of Secretary Gonzales and Bunye. It is our duty to believe the President! Shameless Senators, shameless unbelievers!

    “This is the reason why the congress is pissed with the senators. In a single house more laws would be passed and things will even out as the smaller groups will gang up against the larger ones to get a fair hearing.”

    Yeah, without these shameless Senators there would be no impediment for Congress to make GMA president for life for the good of the Filipinos. There would not be any distraction like those jueteng and election scandals because there would be no shameless Senators who would bring out unfounded accusations. Shameless. They should be hanged.

    May you sleep forever hahaha

  15. In reply to #10, 14

    Jeg,

    I agree with Jon Mariano’s comment (#11, 13)

    A fuss is being made because the NY Times editorial is a credible organization from the outside looking in and affirming what everyone in the press and the opposition has been saying all along about the Arroyo government. And as far as newspapers go, they’re one of the most well known and respected.

    Yes indeed the administration’s reaction is laughable at best. Who are they trying to fool? Blame the opposition for everything negative said about them. And that comment of Baja’s on come visit the Philippines and breathe the air of freedom? Lame.

  16. ricelander..

    You think that comment is only for the Senate.. Maybe for others as well in other places?

    Enrile said some things?
    Little missy said some things about Enrile?

    PCIJ comments about the dean of UP..

    There are lots of places where people say things and if you read it all i commented on both sides…

    Also notice i actually said a good thing about Biazon being more balanced at times.

    I think the Senate does have a purpose but i think they also play the game too much and dont actually get on with the job.

    Every heard of sorting through items placing a time limit for discussions. If you cannot agree then throw it out.. Dont just sit on over 200 Laws..

    We voted for the Reps in both houses what we don’t trust half of them? Or is it that we don’t like the other half..

    Why would the Senators be less corrupt than the Reps?

    What makes them the champion of country, because the work 100 days and get paid for it.. and have no actual production. You can do the Inquiries and pass laws at the same time, this is why each one of them have staff around them so they can do many things, but it seems they don’t. How can one house pass 200 laws and have investigations and an impeachment inquiry and the other house have 4 laws?

    I cannot work it out the numbers don’t work out..

  17. I don’t know about judging the house and the senate with the number of bills they passed (they become law once the president signs them, is that right?). Do we have a list of these bills, and see what are in them? Maybe of the hundreds passed by the house a big portion is changing street names? It’s good to criticize these two chambers, but let’s make our criticisms more accurate…

  18. re. #9

    sleeping,

    even if the senators stand in front of TV cameras 24/7, if all they ever did was provide checks and balances to the (abuses of the) congress, then they’d hell as already earned their right to exist!

    “And we should abolish the Congress as well and have no government.. Thats what your proposing..”

    ows? i said that?

    you really know what you’re talking about when you said that opinions can’t be used as facts, cuz you’re basing it on your own experience! 🙂

    but don’t be ashamed though…experience is always a good thing. di nga ba merong sikat na kasabihan, na “experience is the best SCHOOL”? 😉

  19. Always remember the New York Times was the employer of Jayson Blair.

    Being a reader of instapundit, andrew sullivan, and kuya belmont etc, I’m familiar with Jayson Blair (and other sins of the US MSM like Rathergate), but what has Jayson Blair got to do with the current NYT Editorial on the PHilippines this time, Marcus Aurelius?

    Can you point out to me where they got their facts wrong on their assessment of GMA?

    it’s easy for rightwingers to cry “jason blair” everytime the NYT reports something negative about bush or arroyo, but this is getting a little old, marcus… I say this as someone who still supports the Iraq intervention.

  20. The art of slinging mud. If it can make a mistake, why should NYT throw the first stone? In Max Soliven’s column today, he advised Gloria to do a Truman, that is to stay the course because newspapers make mistakes (in Truman’s case, the papers said that Dewey will be president by beating Truman by a landslide. A terrible miss-call.). The logic again is, “Forget what they say”, they make mistakes anyway; the current issue is a mistake too. Whoever wrote the editorial must be like Blair!

  21. CBCP released a statement expressing alarm at the signature campaign.

    URL: http://www.cbcponline.net/html/peoplessinitiative.html

    excerpts:
    “Is this truly a “people’s initiative” or the initiative of self-seeking political players wanting to entrench themselves in power? We might further ask the question of the source of funding for this entire operation.”

    i wait with bated breath malacanang’s (and sleeping’s) reaction.

  22. People in Power (not “People Power”) are deep in greed yet not drowning: a never-ending problem. Let us be Filipinos once and for all! You know what I mean.

  23. MLQ3,

    The reaction of Gloria to tap FOREIGN SECRETARY ROMULO to knock on the doors of NY Times is sooooooo embarassing and soooooo telling, so kaaaapppppal.

    We have an ambassador to the US who can and should do the job of making the Palace dissatisfaction known. That Gloria is thinking of sending the country’s FOREIGN SECRETARY is so disproportionate. Gloria is really NANGINGINIG!!! Hahah! Buti nga sa kanya… Imagine sending a major member of the cabinet to say “arf, arf, arf” or “meow, meow, meow”…

    The Americans who are still Gloria’s ultimate ‘lord and master’do NOT appreciate Gloria’s dismal performance. (NYTimes is basically Republican leaning…)

    I’ve always been convinced that when the US blinks, Gloria will be a goner. For the moment, she’s ok but when the going gets tough and the tough doesn’t get going – hah, she’s dead!

    Notice too that new US ambassador to the Philippines went and paid a courtesy call on the Senate President for an hour. Because the meeting was held in closed doors, we can only imagine what Drilon may have complained about to the lady envoy… something like “Gloria is being thoroughly beastly” or something akin….Heheheh!

    US Embassy memos will contain the minutes of that meeting and I am pretty sure that the US envoy’s report will contain not very flattering remarks about Gloria, couple that with the public reaction to the NY Times editorial on Gloria bordering on elation and you get the gist.

    Gloria knows that things will be coming to a head with her American friend/s. She will be very busy, busy as a bee to try “to counter” US Embassy reports and other US intel gathered reports in order to please Dubya. She knows she is treading on very shaky grounds today. Her cha-cha, PI initiatiatives won’t save her in the end.

    The US ambassador is a PRO, a Republican and is a WOMAN; it will also be harder for Gloria to sell to a woman with a conservative background. Gloria ain’t fooling the lady envoy with her Philhealth cards, her alms to the poor, her photo-ops with children in an orphanage, her revolving door policy for her generals, her pics on her birthday surrounded by retired generals Ebdane, Calimlim, her speeches to the graduating batches in PNP and PMA, etc.

    I suggest we all write as well to Democrat Sen Hillary Clinton of NY who is a proponent of human rights… if she picks up what’s really going on in PI, she may just put in her ‘influence’ to tip in the balance…

  24. Good opinions and analysis have facts as their foundation. The fact the NYT ignored a journalist who so was so cavalier with facts, just because those facts fit their agenda (as well as the reporter himself) is one big SO.

  25. I think that the Thai system features Dan Mariano mentioned in his column played a part in the successful resolution of their crisis. I would like to stress, however, the important role of the Thai king, as a respected, non-partisan head of state. There is room in their political system for the type of political but non-partisan intervention made by their king. Commentators have pointed out the various distinguishing features of a parliamentary system but often don’t understand the importance of the separation of roles between the a non-partisan head of state and a partisan head of gov’t. The role of the head of the state becomes particularly important during crises as shown by developments in Thailand.

  26. Marcus Aurelius, as someone who still does not support the Iraq intervention, i would like to add my voice to John Marzan’s. Someone from the left can similarly cry “Judith Miller” (of nonexistent WMD fame), but fortunately, Judith and Jason do not have anything to do with the brief editorial in question. The title and the first two paragraphs are opinions while the next three paragraphs are a narration of what is already publicly known. The last sentence is simply an unsolicited advice to the Bush. Unless you can specifically point to an assertion or fact that is fictitious in the body of the text, past transgressions (to the Left and to the Right) are of no relevance.

  27. Good opinions and analysis have facts as their foundation. The fact the NYT ignored a journalist who so was so cavalier with facts, just because those facts fit their agenda (as well as the reporter himself) is one big SO.

    Jayson Blair is so 2003, Marcus.

    and I don’t think I got a straight answer from you re the editorial. this was my question for you:

    Being a reader of instapundit, andrew sullivan, and kuya belmont etc, I’m familiar with Jayson Blair (and other sins of the US MSM like Rathergate), but what has Jayson Blair got to do with the current NYT Editorial on the PHilippines this time, Marcus Aurelius?

    Can YOU point out to us where they got their facts wrong on their assessment of GMA?

    I ask you which part of their editorial on Arroyo did the NYT got wrong, but instead of giving me a straight answer, all I got is this Jayson Blair runaround crap.

  28. That is your opinion Marcus. But is it not a case of “oh, there’s a dot on your white shirt!”. That is, focusing on the small dirt and ignoring the clean shirt?

  29. MLQ3,

    This is in line with the title of your blog or more fittingly: “Where is the Filipino (AFP general’s) sense of shame?” Gloria, SND Cruz and Gen Senga don’t seem to posses this trait at all.

    Theirs is also a government where the buck doesn’t stop anywhere… read the following Inq7 report http://news.inq7.net/breaking/index.php?index=1&story_id=71991

    There’s no use expecting anything substantial of the Mayuga report. It will have been sanitized to concur with Gloria generals line of defence that they did not participate in the election manipulations in the south in favor of Gloria; the report morevover, will “clear” Garci…

    The commanding general who recalled “whistleblowing” BrigGen Gudani from his Mindanao assignment after Garci complained of the Gudani’s “non-cooperation” is already out of harm’s way. He is now ambassador to Australia and cannot be expected to reveal what Gudani told him during their one-on-one meeting at PN Hqs following Gudani’s recall.

    Why do you think Gudani’s predecessor was asked to “RETIRE” earlier than scheduled? Mayuga had to be given a reward presumably for “sanitizing” his report. Even if Mayuga will stay in his current Flag Officer in Command, PN for less than a year, the position is infinitely better than AFP Inspector General – he is finally king of his own kingdom (just as Angie Reyes had promised him in 1999)!

    So, don’t expect anything of Vice-Admiral Mayuga report – it will be synonymous to a whitewash.

  30. Correction:
    Why do you think Gudani’s predecessor was asked to “RETIRE” earlier than scheduled?

    Should have been “Why do you think MAYUGA’S predecessor was asked to “RETIRE” earlier than scheduled and rewarded with post of ambassador to Australia?

  31. Since Gloria believes in Divine Will so much, she better spend more time in deeper meditation. Start re-reading the writing on the Malacanang chapel walls. Divine Will it seems is beginning to change its mind about her.

    Call it Divine Will, man-made or “coincidences”, but these incidents are rather strange:

     The New YorkTimes editorial entitled “Dark Days For Philippine Democracy” came out on the same day as Gloria’s birthday.
    ï‚· The newly-appointed US Ambassador to the Philippines Kristie Kenney paid a visit to Senate President Franklin Drilon in his office on the same day that the NYT Editorial was published.
    ï‚· The Thailand experience occurred when the Philippine opposition forces were losing steam. But now have been brought to life again because of the Thaksin example.

    Just wondering too if it’s Divine Will that is pushing Gloria, JDV and Puno to so arrogantly ram the Cha Cha Train down the people’s throats so that she will finally commit the ultimate blunder – the eventual rigging again of the results of the Cha Cha plebiscite, which will finally lead to a public indignation so tumultuous that she will finally be forced out of office?

  32. I think it is a good thing to have the tide of international public opinion finally turn against gluemax. It’s about time this happened.

    Perhaps this article by the NYT will herald the sallying forth of other opinion columns regarding this seeming inexorable decline of democracy in our country. Hopefully it is not just the US that will see fit to assail gluemac’s undemocratic ways but other countries as well and from all other quarters on economic, political, and social fronts.

    Hopefully more drastic measures by other nations to mete out penalties to cripple the gluemax regime are forthcoming.
    Embargoes and such..

    That’s the happy news. There are less pleasant things to consider..

    ~~~
    As citizens of a sovereign state, I think we ought to realize that it is to our collective disgrace as Filipinos that the person who purports to stand in our behalf as our president should feel terribly anxious over some negative opinion written up about her.

    Despite the fact that we declared our independence from the US over 50 years ago, it’s just absolutely deplorable that every one of our presidents since has thought himself beholden to the CIA, the World Bank, IMF, and the White House. Why this is so is another discussion altogether.

    But it’s no consolation that we are no better off with gluemax around when it comes to this “brow beating amongst nations” sort of thing.
    I guess it’s because she really has a lot to answer for.

    Well gluemax, serves you right for usurping what isn’t yours to begin with.
    If you can’t stand up to the US, then that’s just one more reason, on top of everything else, for all to see quite plainly that you don’t have what it takes to run this country. Least of all, a legitimate genuine mandate from us.

    Call for a snap election.
    Step down.
    Go on self exile and get the hell out.
    -While you still can..

  33. In A Pig’s Eye,

    It is, as you say, quite embarassing that our leaders can not “stand up” to the US but really, being able to stand up or not to America is not the issue today because I believe the US will not interfere UNNECESSARILY or will not be vocal about their “dissatisfaction” if and when their partners are reliable partners particularly in a domain that has become a global concern: ANTI-TERRORISM.

    Frankly, Gloria and her putrid politics are doing the Philippines no favor at all when it comes to self-respect vis-a-vis the US…

    We must also consider the fact that the Philippines is strongly dependent not only on the US-RP Mutual Defence treaty for the defence of the Philippines in case of external aggresion but also, on US financial aid. (Remember, they say, beggars can’t be choosers.)

    Also, because the current Philippine political and moral debacle involves no less than the highest office in the land, our Republic finds itself in a very precarious situation vis-a-vis all international powers over and beyond the US. This is what makes American “interference” more pronounced than it should be in the Philippines.

    It would be safe to assume that had the Philippine situation been more stable, US “interference” would have been hardly felt, i.e., US State Dept Undersec Christopher Hill’s visit pronto to Manila at the height of Gloria’s SOE, US envoy K Keeney’s closed-doors meeting with Senate President Drilon, etc.

    Sadly, the Philippines because of Gloria is terribly UNRELIABLE today so the US media is right to “criticize” its partner…

    Now, in line with COMMAND RESPONSIBILITY, who is responsible for the the way America is flexing its vocal muscles today? Why Gloria and her putrid governance, of course!

  34. Ate Glue is so brain damaged that she cannot understand the credible editorial of NY Times, dimissing it as taking the position of opposition.

    Wake up! Ate Glue can fool her so called silent majority like Bong “Asterisk” but not an independent foreign news organization.

  35. The British-based Financial Times has also slammed Gloria in its April 4, 2006 editorial, which said:

    “”Flawed individuals and constitutions, not inappropriate political philosophies, are to blame for the latest crises afflicting the democracies of south-east Asia. The problem with Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, the Philippine president, is not democracy but the way she subverted it by secretly talking to an election official during vote-counting in 2004 and refusing to explain herself when damning recordings of her telephone calls were leaked.”
    http://news.ft.com/cms/s/cfc7048a-c376-11da-a381-0000779e2340.html

  36. The Cha-cha train of gma is doomed to fail, for it has a defective engine (corruption-filled institutions) and hypocrite crews. What we need to change is the EXECUTIVE BRANCH and the manner of selecting appointees there. Look! gma can freely choose whom to appoint for the (already tainted) COMELEC. Eh siyempre, will she appoint someone that would go against promoting her own personal interests? We need to get rid of these bad worms that are now heaping in the executive branch. Oh! they are so dangerous and poisonous! Nakakaloko na.

  37. “Hopefully more drastic measures by other nations to mete out penalties to cripple the gluemax regime are forthcoming.
    Embargoes and such..”

    Good God, pig’s eye, have you any idea at all what you’re saying? Who will be the ones to bear the brunt of this embargo you so earnestly hope for? Arroyo and her big fat husband you so passionately revile? Not likely. The first ones to suffer will be class C, D and E, not the dwellers of La Vista. Not that an embargo is even a remote possibility, but the fact that you could so casually consider it without a thought for the consequences on your fellow citizens, just so you can fulfill your political aims, says a lot.

  38. segue from politics…

    to techies out there: just a reaction please…

    The Mobile Phone Spy: A Software to Monitor ALL your Phone Activities
    Jerry Liao

    Technology has brought the art of spying a notch higher. From our workstation at the office, to casual Internet surfing at home and our seemingly private email or telephone conversations, we are all under the microscope. To make matters worst, we the public may have no idea that we are being spied on.

    Remember the Hello-Garci tape? While most of the attentions were focussed on the authenticity of the taped conversation, not so much attention was given to how it’s done. What equipment was used? Who did the wiretapping? When and where was it done? Who’s phone was wiretapped? The questions goes on and on.

    If there’s one gadget that can be considered as the closest gadget to our lives nowadays, no doubt that the hands down choice would be – our MOBILE PHONES. People from all walks of life own a cellphone. Its primary usage is to communicate with people. We love it so much that for some, they cannot live without their cellphones. Some will even give up their lives just to protect their phones while others are willing to take lives just to take possession of the phone.

    What if I tell you now that your mobile phone can be spying on you without you knowing it?

    http://www3.mb.com.ph/archive_pages.php?url=http://www.mb.com.ph/issues/2006/04/05/TECH2006040560681.html

  39. Demosthenes,

    No need to get excited because if for the sake of argument, foreign nations decided on an embargo for the Philippines, the more than 10 million overseas Pinoys would not let the em folks in Pinas down… they would double or treble if not quadruple their remittances which should mean $13 billion x 4 (or a whopping $52 billion) internal spending money for the nation. And really, the result is that ordinary people might do away with paper money and go for the old BARTER tradition and stimulate everyone to be creative…

    Well, obviously, if such a scenario occurred, there would be a need to tighten the belt: military would have to forego buying ammos, the PNP might be forced to do same for lack of funds(???? unless of course, Joma’s diatribes could produce funds for the CPP) so there should be less “fratricide”, the DPWH would be building less roads (think of bakshish being eradicated), would be less cars in the street too to save on petrol (good for environment), Congress would be forced to go into recess coz no more pork barrel (so the hated Opposition would be NO MORE), rich, wealthy, very wealthy people would sell their assets at bargain prices (just like what happened during one of the troubled moments of the Aquino presidency, e.g., Manila Golf shares were being peddled at a fraction of their value, prime properties were sold for peanuts), etc…

    Might not be such a bad thing after all, don’t you think?

    For all you know, if the country found itself in such a shit-scary situation, foreign investments by gambling lords might increase too: you’d have more gambling syndicate lords of the Stanley Ho variety not only from Macau and China coming but also from Russia, etc… Gloria would be able to announce to the world an all time high and record breaking foreign investments in spite of the embargo…

    Dontcha worry. The nation’s favorite “president” would be up to the task! She’d defy em all fringe lunatics of embargoeing nations after all she’s been defying the law of political, legal and moral gravity, hasn’t she?

    Heheheh!

  40. Re New York Times editorial, I have no doubt that the editors’ statements were based on reliable sources coming from the Philippines or elsewhere.

    But Jeg makes a good point about why Filipinos should put more importance or reliance on it, rather than commentaries by fellow Filipinos who are out there on the trenches.

    True, traditionally the “gray lady”, the newspaper of record, has enjoyed great respect and deference not only in the States but worldwide.

    But its many famous mistakes and charges of liberal bias (even its last public editor admitted on print that the people behind the paper espouse liberal ideas and which ideas may find their way into print) notwithstanding, it has been losing its luster during the past years and at times its readership too, especially in its bailiwick, the New York area. From 2001 to 2004, it lost 20% of its NY subscribers. In fairness, most major newspapers in the States are losing readership, while NYT has posted modest circulation gains for the last year.

    Still, at the end of 2004, daily subscribers total only 1.1 million, and the Sunday edition at 1.7 million. And New York State alone has almost 19 million residents.

    (One liberal blog alone, DailyKos, already gets visitors daily totaling close to 500,000.)

    But the greater damaging blow has been inflicted by Wall Street: Its stock lost 35% of its share value in 2005 alone.

    All these are big blows that should reflect on the exhibited trust and confidence not only of readers, but also of the investing public. The latter being those who vote with their wallets.

  41. For Gloria, anything written that is critical of her is opposition-influenced. Anything written that praises her is objective. But what can you expect from someone who intimidates the press and blatantly lies?

    Compared with Gloria, Jayson Blair looks like he lied like George Washington.

  42. baycas, i don’t think that the mobile phone Trojan/spyware would be made to work on my Nokia 3315.

  43. Interesting column item “Delicadeza and Lies” by JB Baylon of Malaya on Cha Cha and the lies, lies, lies surrounding the whole thing.

    Everybody has its own agenda on Cha Cha amendments.
    And so everybody seems to be lying to each other.
    Gloria is lying to De Venecia.
    De Venecia is lying to Gloria.
    The Congressmen are lying to the Governors and Mayors.

    The Governors and Mayors are the only ones probably not lying because they really don’t know what’s going on and what the plans are for them in a revised or amended Constitution. They don’t know what schemes Congressmen have up their sleeves which could weaken governors and mayors as potential political rivals once the Consitution is tinkered with.

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