Barangay Bansot’s Silent Majority

This was supposed to be my column for today.

Barangay Bansot’s Silent Majority

KAPITAN Calabasa was late, and so, he missed most of the fun. But he got to hear Madam’s thank you remarks.

“Thank you, Eminensh, Your Exshelenshiesh. Thank you fathersh and shishtersh. Here are your love offeringsh, let ush continue to do the Good Lordsh, I mean, my hushband’s, my childrensh, and my, work. We are the Holy Family. God put ush here.

“Thank you, congreshmen. Thank you, governorsh. Thank you, mayorsh. Thank you, kagawadsh. Here ish your fork barrel flush an attendanshe bonush, and yesh, your frojektsh are shafe.

“Thank you, columnishtsh, for your dedicashion to our truth: don’t worry, your hushband will remain in charge of our penshionsh, and you, your board sheat in our bank ish shafe. Oh, and ash for you, shorry, no more readersh shince you moved to our crony fafer but I appreshiate your effortsh anyway, but shtof throwing water in feofle’s fashes, ha? To all of you othersh, fretending to be objective, your veshted intereshts are one with mine!

“Thank you clashmatesh, I don’t regret giving you jobsh in my adminishtrashion.

“Thank you generalsh, thank you bushineshmen, we will all froshfer together. I shay to all of you… We will not be dishtracted by the folitical noishe!”

When everyone was through falling to the floor to demonstrate awe and delight, the hard-working Madam tackled other business.

“And now, we need to work on our meshaging. Shecretary Fabili?”

“Dukutin ang pang matrikula, ituloy ang aming ligaya!”

“I don’t like. Too honesht. Shecretary Calburo?”

“Sa laki ng matrikula, turo ninyo pamumulitika!”

“Good. Plashter along the shcoolsh that hate me. Shec. Madaya, you can charge it to the nutrishion frogram. Nexsht?”

“Itrabaho natin ang panggugulo!”

“No. Shec. Hormiga?”

“Trabaho hindi gulo!”

“Good (give my regardsh to Mala Bihon). Theshe will be the shlogansh of Kashabwit sha Kalokohan. Charge their adsh to the Dishinformashion Agenshy. Nexsht?”

“Patabain natin ang mga pulitiko!”

“Hay nacu. Shec. Nalito? Imfrove, pleashe?”

“Pagkain hindi politika!”

“Clever. Slogansh for Kongresho ng Mambububulong Filipino. Charge the adsh to Metro Gago. Nexsht?”

“Ikuryente ang media, lokohin natin para sa presidente!”

“Too blunt. Shec. Bungi?”

“Ibaba ang kuryente, hindi ang presidente!”

“Good. Slogansh for Fartylisht Kakuntshaba. Charge to Frovidentshal Bashtushang Fambanshang Liaishon Offishe. Nexsht. Our latesht innovashionsh in fromoting the Rule of Lawleshnesh? Shec. Shiraulo?”

“Madam, since we are fighting the Truth, we decided that even if we have to sacrifice Executive Ordure 464 and Mambobola Circular 108, we simply issue new rules accomplishing the same thing.”

“Ish Monkey Gotme drafting them?”

“Yes Madam!”

“Your Eminenshe? Queshtion?”

“Aren’t we insulting the intelligence of our flock in Barangay Bansot?”

“Wait, my shon will anshwer that.”

“You ha. Wait ha. We’re not bastos, ha. Shut up ha? I don’t care what you say, ha? You’re giving daddypoo high blood pressure, ha. Just obey-obey us! We give you na nga eh why are you so demanding pa, ha?”

“But the desert, our sea, the Israelites…”

“Ah. Desshert? Meaty Forflavor will get for you, Eminenshe. Chocolate or vanilla? Anyway. Yesh, Mr. Juramentado?”

“Santa Palanggana! Madam, there are destabilizers from… from… all your alma maters! In Putakti City! Evil, awful… what do you call them, oh, students!”

“We are shafe here in Campo Carne. Yesh, Mareng Meanie? Thank you, by the way, for shuforting me, but (he-he) get real. My darling hushband ish staying.”

“Oh. But. Madam, the young people, their requests?”

” I hereby decree, a No Hover Zshone in Futakti Shity. Becaushe if you don’t shee them, they don’t exshisht. Shimfle! Yesh, Father Imbyernash?”

“But… reform… strengthening… institutions? Help?”

“Tell them to take it uf with my shonsh. They are the youth, too. They are the pillarsh of the inshtitushionsh we’re building.”

“Mommy, only if they’re pretty, ha? I don’t like talking to the pangit-pangit, ha? Or the brainy ones, ha? They can make a date with me in my restaurant, plenty-plenty food there.”

“OK you heard him. Go away. Yesh, Mishish Faidroshash?”

“I bloody support you, eh wot!”

“Cheaf, you shound like your daughter. But I already shaid, thank you columnishtsh.”

“But Madam…”

“Yesh, Shfeaker Jar-Jar?”

“Waza boutda peepol? They issa hates youse!”

“Sho? We have the Shilent Majority shuforting ush! The besht! They don’t need to be bribed, they don’t vote, becaushe they don’t exisht! Ferfect! More for all of ush! Anymore queshtionsh? None? Dishmished!”
***
blargh.jpg

396 comments

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    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 10:49 am

    …or why we should not.

    • ramrod on March 4, 2008 at 10:55 am

    “Fortunately or Unfortunately, the next generation is unlike my generation anymore. They are geared more towards the Western way of doing things.” – silent waters

    So true. At least in the manufacturing sector (or conversion) you see efficiency and productivity programs in the system, JIT, HACCP, GMP, ISO900/1400, sustainability, etc. Its the next generation chinoys I’m worried about, being educated in international schools, or abroad, or even in our exclusive schools, they might not choose to take on the cudgels of the family business as they are already being woed by multinationals. One chinese friend confided to me that he’s worried that when he invites his son to join the family business, he might be asked “can you afford me?”

    • mlq3 on March 4, 2008 at 10:58 am
      Author

    silent, more than that. perhaps several factors:

    1. they want the president to be given a chance to mount an adequate defense, but one where her defense is also subject to public scrutiny (impeachment)

    2. they sense that this is one administration prepared to spill blood to keep itself in power: and is it worth dying for the current leaders/groups on the other side?

    3. wariness over the vp’s fitness for office; horror over the possibility things would get out of hand and lead to an estrada restoration or a communist takeover or a military junta

    4. preference to put things off until 2010 which avoids calling anyone’s bluff on items 2 and 3

    • Mita on March 4, 2008 at 10:58 am

    what’s wrong with people fending for themselves? i was taught that self-sufficiency was a good thing…

    what is a pragmatist? someone practical, no non-sense and businesslike, diba? why is this bad? different times call for different leaders. when cory was president, the country just came through a dictatorship. she won the snap elections because people sought that idealism and she represented that to a lot of us – mainly because of her faith and her late husband.

    if we, the people, keep looking for leaders who will inspire us to do more, that doesn’t say much of us, does it? after 22 years don’t you think we ought to have it in us to inspire ourselves?

    a good leader is always appreciated, but unlike the pope, a leader is not infallible.

    • JMCastro on March 4, 2008 at 11:01 am

    Silent Waters:

    “Fortunately or Unfortunately, the next generation is unlike my generation anymore. They are geared more towards the Western way of doing things.”

    Perhaps, which is a pity because I believe that the great societies I have had the good fortune to observe build on the past and the present to chart a greater future for themselves.

    • mlq3 on March 4, 2008 at 11:02 am
      Author

    mita, in the public sphere you will always need leaders capable of inspiring followers. that is difference from the indendence of thought that helps people in their own lives: though if enough people start thinking independently and display initiative, it also changes the kind of leadership that resonates with the public.

    • Jeg on March 4, 2008 at 11:06 am

    what is a pragmatist? someone practical, no non-sense and businesslike, diba? why is this bad?

    Pragmatism kasi Mita is used as an excuse for an absence of principles. If it works, then it’s ok. Principles be damned.

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 11:20 am

    Jon (at 7:37am), i don’t we can apply fuzzy logic in matters when truth is boolean. Either Jun Lozada was kidnapped (or not). Either the FG is involved in the NBN/ZTE scam (or not). Either Gloria Arroyo cheated in 2004 (or not). In these matters, there is no room for Pontius Pilate.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 11:26 am

    CVJ

    It’s not the mainland CHinese themselves..the communist party does not represent the majority of the Chinese people. Deng realized this and that is why he decided to espouse “To get rich is glorious”. He realized that time will come the people in the mainland will not stand for staying in their miserable existence as they see their own hua chiao (outside the mainland china) relatives prosper.

    That being said, you may have some point that the oligarchs were removed, which allowed the communists also to do as they please. My argument with you has always been not about the removal of the oligrachs but your method….kasi you said the first 300 families…who decides???? who is 300th and 301st? Also, is this by the barrel of the gun that you will tell them to “give” away their riches? Eh kung pinamigay na nila? Paano naman yung next 300 since they now may be the new rich? That’s the slippery slope I can’t get. You’re asking people to donate their hard earned money. What If I ask you also to do that? Yung hard earned money mo sa Singapore? Willing ka ba since you’re probably earning more than the bottom 90% of our population???

    • james on March 4, 2008 at 11:27 am

    for rumor mongers from Torrevillas

    Unfortunately, the very state of our political affairs is currently being shaped by this “so-and-so said this” culture. Hearsay is now taking the place of verifiable evidence and solid proof.

    This is the compelling point that San Beda Graduate School of Law Dean Fr. Ranhilio Callangan Aquino makes, in a letter he wrote to the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP).

    Fr. Aquino expressed how he found the reactions and aggressive attempts of Archbishop Oscar Cruz, a number of priests and nuns, and militant groups questionable and out of context. Their all-out and categorical support for Jun Lozada has been based solely on perception and personal inkling.

    Moreover, Aquino points out that Lozada is far from being an unassailable witness, simply because he cannot even justify all the “bombs” he has dropped by himself.

    If we rely on these factors as our basis to judge right from wrong, we might as well abolish the justice system.

    Nowadays, it seems that if someone makes an accusation against you and manages to style himself as a modern-day martyr, then bam! Automatically you’re guilty.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 11:35 am

    JM Castro

    WHen I was young, I abhorred having to learn Putonghua in the Chinese school I attended…but guess what, it’s so useful now. So in a sense, the Confucian doctrine of conformity has it’s place in this universe….hehe.

    I think the reason why Chinese society evolved to the Confucian doctrine is because of population. This allows orderliness. You can actually see it to some extent in Tsinoy society. The Federation of Chinese Chamber of Commerce and Industry basically acts like a government for all Tsinoy matters. All advocacies, disputes, etc. fall under this federation. ALl Tsinoy organizations, schools, clan asociations, etc. defers to the organization. That’s why the Tsinoys will give you an impression of having one voice. Underneath, there’s also a lot of cracks. 😉

    • tonio on March 4, 2008 at 11:40 am

    thanks for speaking up manolo. it clears out the garbage (from both sides) when you do.

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 11:41 am

    Silent Waters, the communists won in 1949 because of the support of the peasants. That’s why Chiang Kai Shek and his nationalist army was driven from the mainland into Taiwan. The latter, learning his lesson, then implemented land reform in Taiwan so that the peasants on that island will not do the same to them.

    After that, Mao and his party went overboard with communist dogma and implemented hare-brained schemes like the backyard industrialization of the ‘Great Leap Forward’ (which is similar to Benign0’s advocacy) and the ‘Cultural Revolution’ (which is why i don’t agree with those who subscribe to James Fallows’ ‘Damaged Culture’ analysis).

    So in 1978, Deng restored sanity in the system by moving away from collectivization and introducing market-oriented reforms. When he finally declared ‘to get rich is glorious’, there were no more oligarchs to get in the way of the masses.

    The oligarchs can be part of the decision-making process if they adopt Abe Margallo’s Bayanihan Pact. Otherwise, as Jackast said above (at 12:34am), we have to go by the principle of “the greater good for the greatest number“.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 11:54 am

    CVJ

    Are you sure the peasants supported them or is it more that the Confucian doctrine of just trusting the leaders at work here?

    I am Chinese, and I know better than you do how Chinese minds work. They don’t like to rock the boat. At that point, as the Pinoys in the countryside would say, we really don’t care who sits in Imperial Beijing. Just leave us alone.

    And that’s why the stupidities of Mao went unabated…because the peasants didn’t really care as long as it doesn’t affect them on a personal level.

    It was only when China opened up in the 70s and these peasants saw their Hua Chiao relatives doing well ECONOMICALLY that they started questioning these so called leaders. Then and only then did pragmatic Deng decide they should do something about it else they might be swept away into the dustbin of history.

    That’s also the reason why the Chinese do not delve into politics in general. They don’t really care except for a few noisy ones who joined politics (Lim, Dy, Lim of Dagupan). All we want is to be left alone to do our things. Of course, iba na kapag illegal…you can;t be left alone then.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 11:54 am

    CVJ

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 11:54 am

    Silent Waters, Ramrod, here is what Lee Kuan Yew had to say to Singapore’s own Chinese business sector:

    …the old family business is one of the problems of Singapore…One of the reasons for our floating an industrial development bank is because of the sluggishness with which people change habits. They are accustomed to buying and selling. And business is kept in the family. They have done this for hundreds of years…Business management is a professional’s job and we need professionals to run our business effectively. – from Visscher, The Business and Politics and Ethnicity

    He might as well have been speaking to the Federation of Chinese Chamber of Commerce and Industry (in the Philippines) whose members have not gotten beyond buying and selling (and rent-seeking).

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 12:04 pm

    CVJ

    I don’t have a problem with Abe Margallo’s Bayanihan Pact in theory. Ang problem is not every rich person will agree to it. What do you do then? Arrest them or worse, shoot them down like dogs so that everybody else will tow the line.

    I don’t understand why it’s such a negative thing to be rich for you. It seems like you feel that people should not become rich at all.

    DO you even know there is quite a lot of rich people who contribute their time and effort out of their busy schedules for worthy causes? Di naman nila sinasabi sa iyo. WHy do they need to announce it to you. The CHinese Chamber has contributed a lot of school buildings in the different areas around the country at 500K a pop, gratis.
    Pag may sunog, mga chinese volunteers and contributed firetrucks ang dumarating. Kapag may salanta at bagyo, the whole chinese community collects the funds and distributes them quietly for the most part without fanfare. Because WE know what this country has DONE FOR US.

    Ikaw, ano nacontribute mo? Your intellect ? That’s not enough mi amigo. Intellectual masturbation gets us nowhere. Its action my friend. Ano ang gagawin MO para mapaunlad ang Pilipinas. It’s not through intellectual discourses only. It’s not through rallies only. It’s spending time and effort to help our country move forward on its feet. It’s being in Manila and doing your bit by not only contributing to the discourse but making sure to see it through.

    • Andres on March 4, 2008 at 12:05 pm

    In Thailand, the military led an uprising to unseat Thaksin. The military officers took over the different positions in the bureaucracy.

    Here in the Philippines, the police and military does not have to lead an uprising anymore, since most of the officers are appointed by the Evil One to the different juicy positions in her administration already!

    As of last count, according to Karina David, there are around 90 retired police and military officials occupying positions from Secretary, Undersecretary, Assistant Secretary, Director, Ambasaddors, Consuls, etc…

    • rego on March 4, 2008 at 12:11 pm

    Ramrod,

    Sorry mdeyo delay ang response ko, kararating ko lang nagbahay eh.

    La lang naman, medyo may pag condescending lang ang dating “SA AKIN” ibang mga comments mo. Parang masyadong pino flaunt mo na ang position mo sa forum na eto. Kaya medyo kinalabit kita.

    Gusto ko pa sanag isa isahing kaya i point-out ang mga yun Pero sa dami na ng comments na dumagasa simula ng umalis ako kanina umaga. Nakakatamad na at saka pagod talag ako.

    One thing that i can remember now is your criticism on people who hide under their nickname instead of their real names. And you seem to be directing it to the peopel who on the other side even if most people on your side are using the same trick too.

    Sa tingin ko kasi, forum naman eto for exchanging ideas eh. So hindi na importante kung ano ang real name mo, personal background, o estado mo sa buhay at kung ano ang trabaho mo o kung saan ka naroroon bansa. The important thing is you know what you are saying and you can defend your stand and conviction well.

    While I dont take it against you for really revealing your real name and background, kasi choice mo yan eh. Kaya lang ang tingin KO ginagawa mo eto para para pakinggan ka or win your argument rather than just presenting your dessertation”. Na kesyo ba CEO ka tatahimik na lang ang kaming mga hindi CEO at tango na lang ng tango sa mga sasabihin mo. To me this is some kind of a weaknes. You argue not with ideas but with your name and personal background. Mas prefer ko yung blind ako sa real identity at background ng blogger so I can focus more on his ideas.

    In one of your reply to me ( last year that I never got the chance reply dahil sa ka busihan ko.) you mention about the poor people that you encountred everyday. Actually na mention mo rin kanina lang , replied to Anthony and ask him look around. For all you know everybody here is exposed to those kind of people lalung lalo na ako. Parang pinapalabas mo mo na napakawalang kwenta na naming mga ayaw sa people power dahil sarili lang namin ang iniisip namin.

    If you would only care to really understand it, our stand was actually founded on the care of those poor people the same as you do.

    Just like you I have done so many foriegn travels and interfaces with other managers and engineers of manufacturing companies around Asia for 6 years. Siguro ang pagkakaiba lang ay product dahil mga cellphone companies Nokia, Motorala, Samsung at yung mag IC subcontractors yung pinupuntahan ko. But this doesn’t mean na superior or expert na tayo sa mga ibang bloggers pagdating sa mga mag bagay na eto. Kasi all those info that we gathered in our foriegn interfaces are very much available through the internet eh, even TV newspapers , books etc etc. I even believe na kahit may first hand account tayo because we see and talk to these foreigner, eh limitado parin yung nakalap natin. Kasi hindi naman talaga tayo nakipag interface for political reason eh. Parang nasisngit lang yun sa mga social hours eh over eat outs or company canteen. So we may not really know kung ano rin ang kalagayan ng mga ordinary workers nila. In the first place most of their rank in file employes dont really speak English. So we cannot really go to them and talk about their real conditions. And I dont think we ever have the time to strike a longer conversations with them. kasi nga hindi naman kasama sa itenirary natin yun eh.

    Anyways, I am not saying that you stop referring to your foriegn interfaces or background. And sinsabi ko lang dont take it as yun talaga ang pinaka “TRUTH” at undebatable na yung mga ideas mo.

    Salamat naman at na inspire pala kita mainvolve sa mga p schorlaship. Keep it up, man!

    • Andres on March 4, 2008 at 12:12 pm

    The ‘militarization’ of our bureaucracy is probably the reason why government service has suffered immensely under the Evil Bitch. I have nothing against these police and military officials but we need experts in different fields to occupy most of these positions.

    What does Larry “Berdugo” Mendoza know about Transportation and Communication? (besides being involved in ZTE!) Is Angelo Reyes an expert in energy to make sure we do not encounter shortage in power in the coming years? What does Lomibao know anything about irrigation? Is Hermogenes Ebdane an engineer or an architect to understand the infra projects that the country need right now?

    This likewise goes to show that survival is more important to GMA than doing good for the country.

    In short, pinambayad niya ng utang na loob ang mga posisyon sa mga pulis at militar para manatili sa poder, sa halip na gumawa ng maganda para sa bayan.

    • rego on March 4, 2008 at 12:12 pm

    Ramrod,

    Sorry mdeyo delay ang response ko, kararating ko lang nagbahay eh.

    La lang naman, medyo may pag condescending lang ang dating “SA AKIN” ibang mga comments mo. Parang masyadong pino flaunt mo na ang position mo sa forum na eto. Kaya medyo kinalabit kita.

    Gusto ko pa sanag isa isahing kaya i point-out ang mga yun Pero sa dami na ng comments na dumagasa simula ng umalis ako kanina umaga. Nakakatamad na at saka pagod talag ako.

    One thing that i can remember now is your criticism on people who hide under their nickname instead of their real names. And you seem to be directing it to the peopel who on the other side even if most people on your side are using the same trick too.

    Sa tingin ko kasi, forum naman eto for exchanging ideas eh. So hindi na importante kung ano ang real name mo, personal background, o estado mo sa buhay at kung ano ang trabaho mo o kung saan ka naroroon bansa. The important thing is you know what you are saying and you can defend your stand and conviction well.

    While I dont take it against you for really revealing your real name and background, kasi choice mo yan eh. Kaya lang ang tingin KO ginagawa mo eto para para pakinggan ka or win your argument rather than just presenting your dessertation”. Na kesyo ba CEO ka tatahimik na lang ang kaming mga hindi CEO at tango na lang ng tango sa mga sasabihin mo. To me this is some kind of a weaknes. You argue not with ideas but with your name and personal background. Mas prefer ko yung blind ako sa real identity at background ng blogger so I can focus more on his ideas.

    In one of your reply to me ( last year that I never got the chance reply dahil sa ka busihan ko.) you mention about the poor people that you encountred everyday. Actually na mention mo rin kanina lang , replied to Anthony and ask him look around. For all you know everybody here is exposed to those kind of people lalung lalo na ako. Parang pinapalabas mo mo na napakawalang kwenta na naming mga ayaw sa people power dahil sarili lang namin ang iniisip namin.

    If you would only care to really understand it, our stand was actually founded on the care of those poor people the same as you do.

    Just like you I have done so many foriegn travels and interfaces with other managers and engineers of manufacturing companies around Asia for 6 years. Siguro ang pagkakaiba lang ay product dahil mga cellphone companies Nokia, Motorala, Samsung at yung mag IC subcontractors yung pinupuntahan ko. But this doesn’t mean na superior or expert na tayo sa mga ibang bloggers pagdating sa mga mag bagay na eto. Kasi all those info that we gathered in our foriegn interfaces are very much available through the internet eh, even TV newspapers , books etc etc. I even believe na kahit may first hand account tayo because we see and talk to these foreigner, eh limitado parin yung nakalap natin. Kasi hindi naman talaga tayo nakipag interface for political reason eh. Parang nasisngit lang yun sa mga social hours eh over eat outs or company canteen. So we may not really know kung ano rin ang kalagayan ng mga ordinary workers nila. In the first place most of their rank in file employes dont really speak English. So we cannot really go to them and talk about their real conditions. And I dont think we ever have the time to strike a longer conversations with them. kasi nga hindi naman kasama sa itenirary natin yun eh.

    Anyways, I am not saying that you stop referring to your foriegn interfaces or background. And sinsabi ko lang dont take it as yun talaga ang pinaka “TRUTH” at undebatable na yung mga ideas mo.

    Salamat naman at na inspire pala kita mainvolve sa mga p schorlaship. Keep it up, man!!!!!!!!!

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 12:15 pm

    CVJ

    Up to now you still don;t get it…manufacturing WAS what the chinese-filipinos in the Philippines did in the 50s, 60s and 70s since retail was an industry we were not allowed to engage in. Or maybe YOU JUST DON’T KNOW your Philippine economic history.

    Ang problema, as I explained in a previous comment is that it became less lucrative as power became more expensive, labor became restive, infrastructure was not upgraded, etc. Referring to LEE KUAN YEW when he doesn’t have ma damn clue as to what the Philippine situation is smacks of stupidity.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 12:18 pm

    CVJ

    As someone who I think is an economist (since you can quote statistics at the drop of a hat), you should know better. People will use their resources for more productive endeavors…

    • mlq3 on March 4, 2008 at 12:21 pm
      Author

    re silent waters/cjv: i have this debate with people all the time. targeting the existing elite only leads them to become even more reactionary and inspires reactionary thoughts among the larger segment of the population that has personal and other ties with them. it is unproductive.

    take a look at how britain broke the power of the aristocracy without having to have a revolution. they did it by imposing very heavy death duties, or inheritance taxes, on those with landed estates, etc. this broke the power of the aristocracy within a generation. but it did so, without directly impoverishing an entire class. what it did was leave the aristos comfortable but without the means to keep pocket boroughs and their stranglehold on government that the pocket boroughs made possible. at the same time, it gave government the resources to pursue socialized medicine, etc. it became an impetus for the aristocracy to enter the professions while also allowing the citizenry to rise up in the world. the result is a far more egalitarian and entrepreneurial britain.

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 12:24 pm

    Silent Waters, i am not arguing against charity work and community-based actions. However, these cannot compensate for apathy in the face of large-scale plunder (and treason). Your argument is no different from those who use their involvement in Gawad-Kalinga as an excuse to ignore injustices at the national level.

    I get the impression that you see yourself as speaking for the entire Chinese civilization. I’ve interacted with enough Chinese from other parts of the world including Singapore, Hongkong, Taiwan to know know that their viewpoints are diverse. The guy who stood in front of that row of tanks in Tiananmen Square is (was) Chinese. The spirit of democracy is alive in Hongkong and Taiwan. Maybe you’re just speaking for those Chinese who like to kow-tow?

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 12:30 pm

    Manolo, in breaking the back of the elite, the whole range of options has to be considered. At the very least, if the more radical option are not there, then even your preferred option i.e. heavy death duties, or inheritance taxes, on those with landed estates as implemented in Britain, would be considered too radical by the reactionaries.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 12:32 pm

    MLQ3

    I think this is a better option that what CVJ is proposing. It really makes sense to me. My only problem is…we still have to clean up the tax collectors first. Else, it’s another fleecing operation.

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 12:38 pm

    Up to now you still don;t get it…manufacturing WAS what the chinese-filipinos in the Philippines did in the 50s, 60s and 70s since retail was an industry we were not allowed to engage in. Or maybe YOU JUST DON’T KNOW your Philippine economic history. – Silent Waters

    I think we are in agreement with the fact that the Chinese businessmen moved out of manufacturing because it was no longer profitable. That is what i’ve been telling Anthony above (at 9:51 pm) that business-acumen alone cannot build-up an industry. For that, you need the support of government so that they can implement the right industrial policies (as was done in our more successful neighbors).

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 12:40 pm

    CVJ

    Ha ha. That’s interesting. I do not presume to speak for all Chinese but I know enough about Chinese culture to know what I am talking about. I LIVED IN IT. Granted there are diverse opinionsbut at the end of the day, the confucian traits still holds.

    The Tian An Men situation is different depending on whose point of view you’re looking at it from. For those students, they’re fightinghting for democracy…for the leaders, you’re trying to tear down the system.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 12:42 pm

    What Anthony was arguing though is that industry does not just mean manufacturing….whether he’s right or wrong is another matter.

    • ramrod on March 4, 2008 at 12:43 pm

    silent waters,

    Not all Chinese businessmen who engage in protests are just “noise makers” some are really, genuinely concerned, and patriotic. In EDSA 2 I was with my former boss mingling with the crowd, he even brought his sons along, to be part of, in his words “history in action.” Of course, nowadays, because of the situation that went from bad to worst politics wise, he has vowed to keep away from all this.
    Oligarchy may not refer to traditional family businesses anymore but this time to people or a group who manipulate/influence policies of the state to benefit themselves at the expense of the whole.
    And Lee Kuan Yew may have something there, as more traditional chinese companies are shifting to family owned and run to professionally managed corporations, these companies may not be highlighted on the news or television but I assure you you can see them in the Top 1000 companies listing. The benefits and compensation package they offer is not bad either. They are already regional players, although are still very discreet.
    There are success stories and sad stories but there would be more success stories when we even the playing field, when the legal operators cannot be held at a disadvantage by illegal ones in terms of cost because these can play footsie with corrupt government officials. Labor issues can be managed by a healthy communication with the union, power issues, well it affects everybody anyway…

    • Madonna on March 4, 2008 at 12:50 pm

    manolo,

    Got alarmed with this news.
    http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/storypage.aspx?StoryId=111045

    Lozada says people should forget about resignation calls and instead says that GMA must be ousted. The ZTE scandal witness is calling on the AFP and PNP to do it.

    What is happening to him? He is way getting over his head!

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 12:53 pm

    Silent Waters, you’ve lived within your own Chinese ghetto within the Philippines.

    • mlwnag on March 4, 2008 at 1:00 pm

    china’s success is because of vast coal resources which are now dwindling.

    if we have coal we should be the best shipbuilders in Asia as our forefathers were already building galleons in wood in the year 1600.

    At 100 dollar oil and imported coal, china’s growth is expected to slow in the coming years.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:02 pm

    ramrod

    I agree with your comment.

    @CVJ

    I have lived in Hong Kong, Taiwan and stayed for a while in China. So don’t give me that BS about me having lived in my own Chinese ghetto. Ang hirap sa iyo, kung wala ka nang masakot, you resort to this kind of retort.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:04 pm

    I don’t know if you’re chinese or not, but I can see the nuances while YOU can’t.

    • mlq3 on March 4, 2008 at 1:09 pm
      Author

    cjv/silent: this is where politics becomes a numbers game. and you have the example of warren buffet in giving away most of his fortune.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:10 pm

    @ Ramrod

    I didn’t mean to say that the chinese who join politics are noisemakers….I mean they want to be involved in politics vs the rest of the chinoy population who prefers to be discreet and fend for themselves.

    That being said, most chinese filipinos are patriotic. But their mindset is such that patriotism is to make sure you create the jobs and get the economy going rather than going to the streets.

    You are right that there should be an even playing field. But then again, that shouldn’t stop you from playing the field even if it’s uneven. In fact, I daresay that if you succeed, there will be a real sense of satisfaction for having been able to buck the odds, di ba?

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:12 pm

    Manolo

    Warren Buffett gave it away on his own free will. That’s where I differ with CVJ. He wants it mandated. I don’t have a problem with people who are or aren’t willing to give away their wealth. I do have a problem with people thinking they could decide to confiscate or”pursuade” people to part with their money involuntarily..

    • ramrod on March 4, 2008 at 1:13 pm

    silent waters,

    I’ve been meaning to ask, but never had the time to do so, why do the Chinese, no matter how rich, or modern, or sophisticated their operations are, still have this picture/s of their parents framed, displayed in a certain part of the office or buiding? Does this have something to do with religion, or do you just love your parents that much?

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:14 pm

    Oh by the way CVJ, I’ve also lived in the Chinatown ghettoes of the US before I came back to Manila….so I DO KNOW what I am talking about. I speak Mandarin, Hookien and started to learn Cantonese. That’s where you’ll actually see the nuances, you know?

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 1:23 pm

    Silent Waters, sorry i stand corrected. Maybe you do speak for all Chinese who prefer to kow-tow to whoever is in power.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:24 pm

    @ ramrod

    It’s to show respect for your parents basically. It’s really a misnomer to call it ancestor worship. If you have read the Analects, one of the most important ideas (which is also espoused in the Christian religion) is to respect one’s parents. When a parent dies, this is a way for us to show our respect to them, by burning incense and bowing down before them.

    For other people, it looks to them like it’s worshipping when it’s not. And for some other people, good or bad, it enforces the notion of the hierarchy/pecking order in society.

    In fact, you can see it also in some of the borrowed Filipino words such as ache, ditse,etc. Because ache means first sister, ditse means second sister, etc.

    Also, our chinese names are generally three character names, right? THe first character as a lot of you know is the surname. The third character is the unique name, but the second character for most (not all, as mine is not) is a generational name for that clan, usually taken from a poem. That way, we know from which generation you’re from. This reinforces also the order that JM Castro talks about.

    In fact, I have nephews and nieces who are older than I am because their mother is my cousin and she’s way older than me. and technically/strictly, they should call me Uncle but of course, in these modern vain times, I tell them not to. 😉 Interestingly enough, I attended a wedding in China for a relative and the son calls me granduncle already because their grandfather is my generation.

    • mlq3 on March 4, 2008 at 1:25 pm
      Author

    madonna, recall my previous entries where i did point out that if you examine lozada’s own beliefs, they’re pretty radical. the closest analogy among the commenters we’re familiar with are those of cjv.

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:25 pm

    CVJ

    ok lang na may backslam pa rin. At least I know the kind of mentality I am dealing with….

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:26 pm

    all talk and no substance pala…

    • Madonna on March 4, 2008 at 1:41 pm

    manolo,

    You didn’t get my point. I agree that Lozada has radical ideas re: the country’s social situation and justice system. But this is the first time I have heard him calling for GMA’s outright ouster. I got an inkling that his exhortations are getting too political, i.e. he we went beyond his knowledge of ZTE, by calling the crowd to examine the other Chinese ODA loans during the Feb 29 rally.

    Tsk. Tsk. IMO, he should stick to what he knows and not get too heady about his influence just because he is deemed credible by the public. Does he now think of himself as a leader? His handlers better clip his wings, because he is going to crash if he doesn’t watch it. I cringe if he would now be going around schools and universities exhorting students to oust GMA.

    • ramrod on March 4, 2008 at 1:41 pm

    “But then again, that shouldn’t stop you from playing the field even if it’s uneven. In fact, I daresay that if you succeed, there will be a real sense of satisfaction for having been able to buck the odds, di ba?” – silent waters

    Yes. I’ve seen this. I was with my former boss through challenging times, in sourcing raw material (which is a big thing in manufacturing) we had to contend with competing with others who resort to unorthodox ways of sourcing, in production, they mix low grade and high grade, etc., too many short cuts – allowing them to undercut us everytime. But the company stuck to its guns, its prices, relying on creativity, innovation, superior quality products and services, and customer support, of course large scale efficient equipment helped. Now the gap between them and competitor is 100%, not even half of its gross revenues. When I left the company and when he was being interviewed by my current foreigner bosses for reference, he put in a good word too. Now, we’re good friends, I normally treat him out to lunch on his birthdays (reversal of roles he says) and even if I don’t smoke, spend time chatting while he smokes a cigar and occasional wine at churchills.
    I probably learned more from him than in college, seminars, and trainings combined, but seeing what he went through to get where he’s at, I don’t think I have what it takes to be an entrepreneur. It takes guts, skill, knowledge, business acumen, and luck (emphasis on luck).

    • Silent Waters on March 4, 2008 at 1:43 pm

    @ ramrod

    Kapal ng mukha also….hehe what industry we’re you in before? I may know him…

    • cvj on March 4, 2008 at 1:45 pm

    Silent Waters, one aspect in which Chinese Confucian culture (if kow-towing can be considered part of that culture) has successfully seeped into the larger Filipino society is in the form of the balimbing mentality. I’m sure Donald Dee, Lucio Tan and the rest will have no problems accommodating whoever follows Gloria Arroyo.

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