Free Burma!

Free Burma!

Free Burma 01

Read the Inquirer editorial, Battle for Burma, and Alex Magno’s column, Emergency. Asia Sentinel has Horror in Burma, and asks, Where are Burma’s Monks?

The Irrawaddy News Magazine Burma Protests page has continuous updates. So does More on Burma in the Guardian Unlimited.

420 comments

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    • Beancurd on October 4, 2007 at 1:40 pm

    Yes, free Burma! And in order not to disappoint or discourage would-be supporters or symphatizers of free Burma campaign, somebody should better ask ate Glue to shut up and that she just work silently behind the scenes.

    • BrianB on October 4, 2007 at 2:41 pm

    Why we are never s brutal as these people (Burmese, Indonesians) is our choice to be gullible of being hard headed.

  1. BrianB, Filipinos are much averse to bloodshed. hence it took 300 years b4 Filipinos can even contemplate a revolution agst the Spaniards. It took 14 years of Martial Law before Filipinos could even muster the courage to mass on the streets. People Power 1 might’ve been peaceful, but peaceful only bec the men holding guns were unwilling to fire on their own countrymen.

    i think that’s the large difference between our soldiers and other countries’ soldiers. foreign soldiers inculcation of the “state” as all, and the only thing that matters, means these soldiers have completed their transformation as mere tools of their state. while our soldiers still retain some sense of individualism not controlled by the state.

    a blessing in times of oppressive regimes that may order wholesale slaughter of massed civilians in protest, but a bane for continued stability as coup after coups rock the nation anytime the soldiers get it in their head to be the nation’s “savior.”

    • cvj on October 4, 2007 at 3:40 pm

    I for one, am proud of our military for refusing to fire on our people during the EDSAs, unlike Tiananmen before and Burma today (which is not to say that they’re completely clean).

    • frombelow on October 4, 2007 at 5:07 pm

    Free Burma. ??? Charity begins at home.

    • BURAOT on October 4, 2007 at 6:52 pm

    As I have said, we should constantly watch those who hold the gun. Civilian rule, however corrupt thay maybe, should always be superior to the military.

    • frombelow on October 4, 2007 at 7:29 pm

    Charity begins at home. Burma is in peril. But how about us.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 7:59 pm

    Code of Conduct of the Filipino Soldier

    1. I am a Filipino Soldier .I will support and
    defend the constitution of the Republic of the Philippines.

    2. I am a Filipino Soldier. I will fight all forces
    that would destroy the freedom of the Filipino People.

    3. I am a Filipino Soldier. I will obey the law,
    legal orders and decrees of my lawful superiors at all times.

    4. I am a Filipino Soldier. I will fight and die in the
    true Filipino tradition of valor, honor, duty and loyalty.

    To all these I pledge my life, my treasure and my sacred honor.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 8:18 pm

    “BrianB, Filipinos are much averse to bloodshed. hence it took 300 years b4 Filipinos can even contemplate a revolution agst the Spaniards.” DevilsAdvc8

    Also, the Spaniards’ effective use of “divide and conquer” and yes religion transformed the savage natives (Lapu-Lapu types) into docile subjects, they also brainwashed the affluent natives to look, act, talk, and even think like spaniards and look down on the lowly indios. With education, the Filipinos became aware, I believe one of the books Andres Bonifacio was able to read was “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” Of course, JPR came into the picture plus several equally brave and educated hero types and the rest is history.

    • frombelow on October 4, 2007 at 9:13 pm

    “I for one, am proud of our military for refusing to fire on our people during the EDSAs, unlike Tiananmen before and Burma today (which is not to say that they’re completely clean).”

    is that the only meausurement. how about propping up a scandalous regime, aside from becoming a tool in some election “fraud.”

    Was their refusal to fire on civilians something to be proud of, or were the soldiers playing politics then?

    I do not advocate an armed forces killing its own people. My point is their acts in the past two EDSAs should be the gauge, not in its greatness but, but its lack in iron-clad discipline other armies have.

    Imagine an army not imposing the will of the state just because there are people on the streets.

    By the way, how about duing the siege of Malacanang on May 1, 2001 by Erap loyalists? They shot civilians then. Ah, selective .

    • cvj on October 4, 2007 at 9:30 pm

    Frombelow, they also shot civilians during the Mendiola Massacre so, as i said above, our military is not entirely clean, but they don’t compare with the Chinese PLA in Tiananmen and the Burmese military today. This is why a peaceful change of government was possible during EDSA and EDSA Dos. I give them credit for their clear sense of mission which is to protect the Filipino people.

    Just to clarify, i’m not proud of the generals and other officers who prop up this illegitimate regime and engage in extrajudicial killings.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 9:30 pm

    “Was their refusal to fire on civilians something to be proud of, or were the soldiers playing politics then?”

    If I remember it right the marines commander at the time was Gen. Artemio Tadiar, he had his orders to shoot from Gen. Ver, but he did not give the order. These were unarmed civilians and clergymen bringing flowers, singing songs of peace and hope – it would be cowardly to shoot then. During Erap’s EDSA, the military was attacked by an uncontrollable mob hurling stones, carrying sticks, maybe even knives – they had to defend themselves. This travesty of EDSA was violent and destructive, it was more of a riot than a people’s organized movement.

    • TDC on October 4, 2007 at 10:04 pm

    In The Quiet Land
    (By Daw Aung San Suu Kyi:NOBEL PEACE PRIZE winner;elected president but imprisoned by the military dictatorship)

    In the Quiet Land, no one can tell
    if there’s someone who’s listening
    for secrets they can sell.
    The informers are paid in the blood of the land
    and no one dares speak what the tyrants won’t stand.

    In the quiet land of Burma,
    no one laughs and no one thinks out loud.
    In the quiet land of Burma,
    you can hear it in the silence of the crowd

    In the Quiet Land, no one can say
    when the soldiers are coming
    to carry them away.
    The Chinese want a road; the French want the oil;
    the Thais take the timber; and SLORC takes the spoils…

    In the Quiet Land….
    In the Quiet Land, no one can hear
    what is silenced by murder
    and covered up with fear.
    But, despite what is forced, freedom’s a sound

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 10:23 pm

    Everybody:

    Its starting. It just a matter of increasing cognitive dissonance.

    Army major defects from Burma

    Oslo (dpa) – While telephone and internet connections with Burma remained difficult Wednesday, a former army major who fled to neighbouring Thailand said he defected since he did not want to shoot at civilians and monks.

    Swedish radio news and Oslo daily Aftenposten published the interview with Major Win and his son who arrived in Bangkok Tuesday after five days on the run from Burma.

    “If he had refused to obey orders, he would have been killed,” the major’s 17-year-old son said.

    Father and son said they hoped to seek asylum in Norway or Sweden.

    Win said he had heard rumours of some 200 killed during the protests, but had not witnessed any killings and could not confirm the numbers.

    The Oslo-based opposition radio station Democratic Voice of Burma on Tuesday said it had received accounts suggesting some 200 people were killed but underlined that the figures were difficult to check.

    Official Burmese tallies suggest some 10 people were killed.

    Earlier, the Oslo-based station’s news editor Moe Aye told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa that telephone connections with Burma were difficult.

    Some telephone numbers in the former capital Rangoon were out of order while it was not possible to get through to other cities, he said, adding that the internet connection was irregular.

    Another development was that the army was trying to force people to give food and money.

    “They raid markets for pork and chickens,” he said, adding that shopowners were afraid to open their shops.

    Raids included a market in Hlaingthayar on the outskirts of Rangoon.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 10:26 pm

    Everybody:

    Its starting. It just a matter of increasing cognitive dissonance.

    Army major defects from Burma

    Oslo (dpa) – While telephone and internet connections with Burma remained difficult Wednesday, a former army major who fled to neighbouring Thailand said he defected since he did not want to shoot at civilians and monks.

    Swedish radio news and Oslo daily Aftenposten published the interview with Major Win and his son who arrived in Bangkok Tuesday after five days on the run from Burma.

    “If he had refused to obey orders, he would have been killed,” the major’s 17-year-old son said.

    Father and son said they hoped to seek asylum in Norway or Sweden.

    Win said he had heard rumours of some 200 killed during the protests, but had not witnessed any killings and could not confirm the numbers.

    The Oslo-based opposition radio station Democratic Voice of Burma on Tuesday said it had received accounts suggesting some 200 people were killed but underlined that the figures were difficult to check.

    Official Burmese tallies suggest some 10 people were killed.

    Earlier, the Oslo-based station’s news editor Moe Aye told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa that telephone connections with Burma were difficult.

    Some telephone numbers in the former capital Rangoon were out of order while it was not possible to get through to other cities, he said, adding that the internet connection was irregular.

    Another development was that the army was trying to force people to give food and money.

    “They raid markets for pork and chickens,” he said, adding that shopowners were afraid to open their shops.

    Raids included a market in Hlaingthayar on the outskirts of Rangoon.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 10:46 pm

    Stupefy!

    • pong on October 4, 2007 at 10:49 pm

    ramrod,

    Is the Code of Conduct pledged to in the order of importance?

    Defending the constitution(1)is more important for a soldier than adhering to the chain of command(3)?

    “1. I am a Filipino Soldier . FIRST and FOREMOST I will support and defend the constitution of the Republic of the Philippines.”

    “3. I am a Filipino Soldier. I will obey the law,
    legal orders and decrees of my lawful superiors at all times.”

    This does not mean blind obedience. But blind obedience is in fact being demanded of soldiers who question the origin of the chain of command — the commander-in chief — as being in clear and present violation of the constitution which they have sworn to support and defend.

    Under the present circumstance, a declaration of ‘withdrawal of support’ to the commander-in-chief by soldiers breaking out of he chain of command is not the appropriate declaration. The declaration should simply be, “I hereby honor my pledge to support and to defend the constitution.”

    • Harry on October 4, 2007 at 10:49 pm

    i wonder where karah is. been waiting for her. maybe she got irritated with me.

    harry

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 10:58 pm

    pong,

    Yes, it is in the order of importance. The premise is that “civilian authority” is superior to military authority.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:00 pm

    harry,

    Probably sleeping, she was complaining of eyebags earlier.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:06 pm

    Under the present circumstance, a declaration of ‘withdrawal of support’ to the commander-in-chief by soldiers breaking out of he chain of command is not the appropriate declaration. The declaration should simply be, “I hereby honor my pledge to support and to defend the constitution.”

    Its just a shame this “code” is not included in the “articles of war,” – Querubin and company could have been vindicated.

    • Harry on October 4, 2007 at 11:10 pm

    ramrod:

    she got addicted with the blog and now she’s recharging. last night, it was already 1am (rp time) and she’s still actively responding to comments.

    if you have a globe postpaid and a 3G or 3.5G phone, i think the web services is quite fast. the only problem is that you have to pay per kb, not based on time usage.

    i’ve got globe and pldt for my dsl purposes and so far globe is cheaper and gives higher bandwidth. pldt’s service sucks with their centralized customer service. takes weeks before they get back to you.

    • TDC on October 4, 2007 at 11:12 pm

    WE are ALL BURMESE!

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:15 pm

    tdc,

    Yes. We are all Burmese!
    Don’t worry, its starting, 1 major in the Burmese army has already defected, details I posted earlier.

    • Harry on October 4, 2007 at 11:15 pm

    ramrod:

    she got addicted with the blog and now she’s recharging. last night, it was already 1am (rp time) and she’s still actively responding to comments.

    if you have a globe postpaid and a 3g or 3.5g phone, i think the web services is quite fast. the only problem is that you have to pay per kb, not based on time usage.

    i’ve got globe and pldt for my dsl purposes and so far globe is cheaper and gives higher bandwidth. pldt’s service sucks with their centralized customer service. takes weeks before they get back to you.

    • BrianB on October 4, 2007 at 11:22 pm

    “i’ve got globe and pldt for my dsl purposes and so far globe is cheaper and gives higher bandwidth. pldt’s service sucks with their centralized customer service.”

    They all suck.

    • TDC on October 4, 2007 at 11:22 pm

    RAMROD:
    Join the “Support the Monks’ protest in Burma”Group in FACEBOOK.317,000 members now and growing!

    WE ARE ALL BURMESE!

    • TDC on October 4, 2007 at 11:23 pm

    Many monks who escaped arrest in the Burmese junta’s brutal crackdown on mass demonstrations in Rangoon and Mandalay are returning to their home villages in ethnic areas and joining armed resistance groups.

    • TDC on October 4, 2007 at 11:30 pm

    Why do I have to fight???
    (By Daw Aung San Suu Kyi)

    They killed my father a year ago,
    And they burnt my hut after that
    I asked the city men “why me?” they ignored
    “I don’t know, mind your business,” the men said.
    One day from elementary school I came home,
    Saw my sister was lifeless, lying in blood.

    I looked around to ask what happened, if somebody’d known,
    Found no one but living room as a flood.
    Running away by myself on the village road,
    Not knowing where to go but heading for my teacher
    Realizing she’s the only one who could help to clear my throat,
    But this time she gave up, telling me strange things in fear.

    Why, teacher, why.. why.. why?
    I have no dad nor a sister left.
    To teach me and to care for me you said, was that a lie?
    This time with tearful eyes she, again, said…
    “Be a grown one, young man,
    Can’t you see we all are dying?
    And stop this with your might as soon as you can,
    For we all are suffering.”

    • BrianB on October 4, 2007 at 11:35 pm

    “Filipinos are much averse to bloodshed”

    I think Indonesian men believe that laughing at tragedy is manly.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:35 pm

    “if you have a globe postpaid and a 3g or 3.5g phone, i think the web services is quite fast. the only problem is that you have to pay per kb, not based on time usage.”

    I am using my phone for surfing problem is its very slow, so now I know its because its under Smart. I’m seriously thinking of switching to Globe now that you told me.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:38 pm

    Harry,

    I think she is still in the other topic, or whatever its called.

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:42 pm

    RAMROD:
    Join the “Support the Monks’ protest in Burma”Group in FACEBOOK.317,000 members now and growing! – tdc

    Done!

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:44 pm

    Okay, I’m switching to Globe!

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:48 pm

    pong,

    You still here?

    • USpace on October 4, 2007 at 11:54 pm

    FREE Burma!!!

    Bush slammed the UN and the rulers of Myanmar in his UN speech earlier this week.

    The UN must do something, but they never use military force to fight.
    That is a huge problem.

    Illegal drug fortunes are a BIG part of this.

    absurd thought –
    God of the Universe wants
    complete narco states

    criminals in power
    loving the corrupt drug war

    absurd thought –
    God of the Universe says
    shoot peaceful protesters

    calling for democracy
    which you must never allow

    http://absurdthoughtsaboutgod.blogspot.com/

    🙂
    .

    • ramrod on October 4, 2007 at 11:55 pm

    Wingardium Leviosa!

    • ramrod on October 5, 2007 at 12:11 am

    The UN is toothless!!!

  2. “i’ve got globe and pldt for my dsl purposes and so far globe is cheaper and gives higher bandwidth. pldt’s service sucks with their centralized customer service.”

    “They all suck.”

    and did you hear the laughable news govt is floating the idea that Globe and Smart now shoulder the NBN? amidst all their bad service? they can’t even straighten up their service with their paying customers so I don’t think they have the right to even dream of taking on that project!

    and much more PLDT! w/the worst record among the telcos providing internet service.

    i would protest even more violently if they continue to insist on pushing that NBN, with any of the private telcos in the Philippines. it will be pure incompetence!

    • ramrod on October 5, 2007 at 12:29 am

    DevilsAdvc8,

    I’ve called up “172” so many times I think I probably talked to all the CSRs already.
    These telcos are charging the government too much for their services, they will not welcome an NBN operated by the government its loss revenue.

    • Harry on October 5, 2007 at 12:40 am

    ramrod:

    karah’s at the at other article titled kowtow. i don’t think she’ll comment in here because she knows i’m in here

    harry

    • vic on October 5, 2007 at 12:52 am

    Free Burma!!Free North Korea, Free the Philippines and the rest of the oppressed…

    • Pilipinoparin on October 5, 2007 at 1:02 am

    The “Desparates” insulted the Filipino health care professionals.

    Manolo, please allow me to post this petition….

    To: ABC

    To the producers of “Desperate Housewives” and ABC:

    We are writing to express concern and hurt about a racially-discriminatory comment made in an episode of Desperate Housewives on 9/30/07. In a scene in which Susan was told by her gynecologist that she might be hitting menopause, she replied, “Can I just check those diplomas because I just want to make sure that they are not from some med school in the Philippines.”

    As members and allies of the Filipino American community, we are writing to inform you that this type of derogatory remark was discriminatory and hurtful, and such a comment was not necessary to maintain any humor in the show. Additionally, a statement that devalues Filipinos in healthcare is extremely unfounded, considering the overwhelming presence of Filipinos and Filipino Americans in the medical field. Filipinos are the second largest immigrant population in the United States, with many entering the U.S. (and successfully passing their U.S. licensing boards!) as doctors, nurses, and medical technicians. In fact, the Philippines produces more U.S. nurses than any other country in the world. So, to belittle the education, experience, or value of Filipino Americans in health care is extremely disrespectful and plain and simply ignorant. Many of the hospitals in major metropolitan areas of the U.S. (and the world) would not be able to operate without its Filipino and Filipino American staff members.

    As Filipino Americans and allies, we band together to ensure that this type of hateful message should not be allowed to continue on our television and radio airwaves. Given the recent amounts of media attention that has been given to Michael Richards (against African Americans), Isaiah Washington (against gays), and Rosie O’Donnell (against Asian/ Chinese Americans), it is ridiculous that this type of hateful speech made it through various screenwriters, the show’s producers, the show’s actors, and ABC itself.

    We demand a public apology to the Filipino American community, and we demand the episode be edited to remove the ignorant and racist remark. We will not allow hateful messages against our community (or any other oppressed community) to continue.

    Sincerely,

    The Undersigned

    View Current Signatures

    • Bencard on October 5, 2007 at 1:06 am

    soldiers are soldiers. while in uniform and in possession of service weapons, they could not be politicians, government critics, opinion makers or lawyers. they are to defend the constitution and the constitutional government and its instrumentalities, even against the people who would try to overthrow them.

    soldiers who want to dabble in politics, or pursue careers as reformers, should first shed their uniforms, return their weapons, and seek discharge from the service. that’s the way it should be, that’s the way it is.

    refusal to fire on violent aggressors on the pretext of “defending the people” is a cop out, if not outright dereliction of duty.

    • Pilipinoparin on October 5, 2007 at 1:21 am

    “religion transformed the savage natives (Lapu-Lapu types)” per ramrod

    I don’t our forefathers were savages, they had their own religion, they were just trying to protect their territories from foreigners.

    • Pilipinoparin on October 5, 2007 at 1:23 am

    it should be ..I don’t think our forefathers….

    My apologies, Manolo

    • jaxius on October 5, 2007 at 1:51 am

    ramrod,

    a good read regarding the issue of officers and soldiers regarding their constitutional duty vis-a-vis the so-called “withdrawal of support” is an article in the Parameters journal of the US War College authored by Richard Swain. It is titled “The Ethics of Officership”. Try this link:

    http://www.carlisle.army.mil/USAWC/PARAMETERS/07spring/swain.htm

  3. PilipinoPaRin, kindly refer to my blog, linked thru my name and read why I think it inane to keep on demanding what you are demanding.

    And just so you know, ABC has already issued their apology, and you should quit while you’re ahead. all fine to protest racial slurs or perceptions thereof, but to continue to beat a dead horse, your group risks showing us Filipinos as the more idiotic between ABC and Teri.

    • Pilipinoparin on October 5, 2007 at 2:44 am

    Devil,

    I don’t know about you but we still have our dignity and pride.

    • grd on October 5, 2007 at 2:51 am

    agree with devils. enough said.

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