My choice

And who knows, if you read and respond to this before midnight, tonight, Philippine time, it could be yours, too.

My choice for Bloggers’ Choice Award in the Philippine Blog Awards, is the collective known as Filipino Voices.

The variety of voices, the breadth (and depth) of the commentary on the site, and the collective representing the most successful and enduring effort to bring the voices of ordinary citizens to the fore, deserves admiration -and recognition by their peers in the blogosphere.

277 comments

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    • leytenian on September 20, 2008 at 10:00 pm

    yeah, filipino voices offers a variety of topics. But this blog has not reached the majority of the provinces to share their opinions not because they don’t want to but due to technological limitation to access. Manolo’s previous blog however has about 620 comments. 90% of the commenters are the “know it all type of people” and I agree… lol 🙂

    • jcc on September 20, 2008 at 10:09 pm

    MLQ3,

    My last post under the last update was that your blog has attacted a conumdrum of voices, mostly elitist in thought. The Filipino people is not involved in your blog unless we claim that we represent them which is hardly the truth. 🙂

    • jcc on September 20, 2008 at 10:17 pm

    i cannot figure out what the photo is. is this a blade server, an air conditioner or a multi-stack cisco switch? 🙂

    • BrianB on September 21, 2008 at 1:52 am

    Some very smart people are voting Mike Villar: http://www.mikevillar.com/

    They have made this video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WgZP6LaPjc

    • BrianB on September 21, 2008 at 1:57 am

    Correction. Only one Pau made the youtube video above.

    • UP n student on September 21, 2008 at 2:44 am

    😛 Two dudes ( both did not pass UPCAT 🙄 ) say they vote for ‘rising internet star’ aka mikevillar. Then, there is the (pretty) mom of one of these dudes — she likes Filipino Voices. Her daughter (also pretty. and she passed UPCAT) likes bikoy

    • BrianB on September 21, 2008 at 2:51 am

    Who’s bikoy? And how do you know these people?

    • hvrds on September 21, 2008 at 10:52 am

    A collective representing many thoughts over individual thoughts should be number 1. My vote for Filipino voices. No contest

    Side bar:

    Individual perceptions based on class contradictions actually speak more about limbic perceptions than anything else.

    Higher brain functions almost totally missing.

    We have to keep battling those limbic tendencies through higher brain functions.

    • KG on September 21, 2008 at 11:15 am

    Ng tumagal nga iyong previous blog thread mo,nandun ako sa FV. buti nga bago na ang entry na ito eh.

    And sa totoo lang nadining ko lang yung FV nung may blog tunglol ke benign0 dito.

    Leytenian,
    madami ka ding comments sa previous thread,are you saying that you are a know it all type??

    • UP n student on September 21, 2008 at 12:41 pm

    bikoy was from Ateneo high school, then he got BS MassComm from Diliman. He still is at UP-Diliman, now taking law.

    Bikoy or mikevillar (younger audience) winning the blog award over FilipinoVoices (older audience) will give some indication of the demographics of Pinas internet crowd.

    • BrianB on September 21, 2008 at 2:38 pm

    Blame Bikoy’s network of friends if he wins and blame the posters of Filipino Voices for failing to promote the blog.

    • BrianB on September 21, 2008 at 2:48 pm

    Isn’t there a controversial senate bill from another Villar that needs seeking teeth into?

    • rego on September 21, 2008 at 3:13 pm

    “katulad din yan ng adovcaies mo at ng mag kasamahan pagtdating sa kabulukan sa pinas eh. l. maganda naman talaga. pero mau nakikinig ba o may napabago ka bang mga tao na nsa kanila dito sa blog maliban doon sa mga datin mo nag kasamahan. wla eh. ang paga aasta mo kasi dito eh its soooo assholic at masyadong pa “holier than than thou” eh. so sino naman ang ganahan lumipat sa side nyo. ;=)” rego

    Well, compare to your posts and comments (which I don’t bother to read because of either wrong spelling or just blabbering incoherently for the most part). Mapatagalog or english mali parin…duh

    My first post, though I’ve been reading mlq3’s blogs more than a year now. I just can’t ignore your self righteous way of shooting commenters. Lumalabas na mas mayabang ka pa nga eh. At least si hrvds may ipagyayabang..Mga post mo wala namang substance.

    mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. no wonder why hvdrs said tanga tlalaga ang pinoy!!!

    Hey cvj tatlong marks lamg ya huh

    • KG on September 21, 2008 at 4:26 pm

    UPN,

    mukhang mukhang dapat di UP n student ang tawag mo sa sarili mo.

    pang admissions office at registrar na yung pinakita mo eh

    ==========================================
    jcc, magkakasundo kayo ni cvj kahit isang beses sa comment mong ito.

    “My last post under the last update was that your blog has attacted a conumdrum of voices, mostly elitist in thought. The Filipino people is not involved in your blog unless we claim that we represent them which is hardly the truth.”

    • anthony scalia on September 21, 2008 at 4:43 pm

    i guess he’s the 123,456,789th Rising Internet Star

    • UP n student on September 21, 2008 at 7:42 pm

    BryanBoy being a Bloggers Award judg is a reminder that the mikevillar or bikoy topics have a following.

    And no one nominated luwaran-dot-com. No one interested?

    • Master Yoda on September 21, 2008 at 8:15 pm

    I totally agree with Manolo’s endorsement of Filipino Voices for the bloggers’ choice award.

    We also do it here in this blog (varied comments and off-topics) but Filipino Voices could be said as the equivalent of multi-tasking, one-stop shop, and multi-level marketing. With a wide array of themes, viewpoints, and the multitude of reactions and comments, FV offers many possibilities.

    But here in mlq3’s blog, I’ve observed the presence of quite loyal commenters that have in a way formed a bond, good or bad, I don’t know?

    ‘Di baleng medyo original, basta nagkukuwentuhan lang tayo. ‘

    • BrianB on September 21, 2008 at 9:44 pm

    Market Manila won, which means there is a possibility big business will be interested in putting money on sites like blogs. My guess.

  1. Huh? How do the dots connect? MarketManila is not a commercial site, accepts absolutely no advertising, and is openly hostile to overtures for paid editorials…

    • nash on September 22, 2008 at 3:59 am

    I didn’t get the UPCAT joke.

    Diba multiple choice exam lang yun?

    • nash on September 22, 2008 at 4:03 am

    “I’ve observed the presence of quite loyal commenters that have in a way formed a bond, good or bad, I don’t know?”

    Siguro.

    I’m quite violent (but I’m used kasi to openly insulting my friends) but I also like the matatarays like The Cat dahil marami ako natututunan sa kanya kahit on other items I cannot agree. I like the sarcastic ones, they should post more often in the comments dahil sila usually yung may original dvd yung iba naglalagay lang ng google search results nila na parang pirated copy.

    • BrianB on September 22, 2008 at 4:18 am

    Market Manila is as middle class as they come. Imagine if a political blog or mikevillar won, what would the corporations think?

    • nash on September 22, 2008 at 4:54 am

    whois mikevillar?

  2. Hello, earth to commenters, what planet are we on? I don’t think I won anything this year… I actually caught a few seconds of the Philippine Blog Awards on the Ustream when working, and I think “Batang Yagit” won the Blogger’s Choice Award for 2008. Marketmanila.com won it last year, 2007 Blogger’s Choice Award. And there isn’t a list of all the winner up yet anywhere in the net as of this posting, so isn’t it bizarre that a blog awards hasn’t bothered to blog about its winners soon afterwards? So BrianB, if a middle class blog such as mine didn’t win it, and neither did a political one or a mikevillar one, then what will advertisers have to say about that??? And thank you fried neurons, for describing me as being “openly hostile to overtures to paid editorials” — that is so me. 🙂

    • Rodolfo on September 22, 2008 at 10:10 am

    atheista dot net ? ? ?

    some one posted that the page below contains list of winners (but word of warning . . . lots of errors or lies or half-truths in various websites of the World Wide Web ) :

    http://www.itot54joni.com/2008/09/philippine-blog-awards-list-of-winners.html

    • hvrds on September 22, 2008 at 12:06 pm

    The first two limbic pundits on this particular thread said something interesting about representation.

    The state is in the process of saving the capital of the richest few in the United States.

    That means the people’s collective savings will be saving them The so very few screwed up badly and royally. But they in the end will be saved and their capital preserved….

    THAT WILL BE ‘KUNO’ FOR THE COMMON GOOD…

    Is that democracy at work or what?????

    • BrianB on September 22, 2008 at 2:02 pm

    Wtf, saw the results posted somewhere. UP n, double check, Bikoy.net is not mikevillar.

    • nash on September 22, 2008 at 5:36 pm

    @hvrds

    very astute. the irony is lost on your limbic friends i suppose.

    • UP n grad on September 22, 2008 at 5:45 pm

    hindi ba iyong AIG bailout is saving the bathwater along with the baby ?

    [ grad na ang gagamitin ko, di na student ]

    • leytenian on September 22, 2008 at 7:35 pm

    The AIG bailout is a good deal that the government has done. $85 bridge loan collateralized with trillion dollar AIG assets, that’s extraordinary. It’s almost like buying a foreclose home of $ 50,000 which is actually worth $300,000. I could sell it right away to overseas investors at $ 120,000. I’m sure the government will clean it up a little bit. Hire new CEO’s , breakdown its holdings and sell it to private entities or wealthy individual.

    • nash on September 22, 2008 at 8:03 pm

    a good deal to nationalise bad debts?

    tapos you complain about the ‘lazy’ welfare cheats but this bail out is a good thing????

    hokey.

    now paulson wants other central banks to do the same. ano siya, hilo?

    • jcc on September 22, 2008 at 8:26 pm

    “The AIG bailout is a good deal that the government has done. $85 bridge loan collateralized with trillion dollar AIG assets, that’s extraordinary. It’s almost like buying a foreclose home of $ 50,000 which is actually worth $300,000. I could sell it right away to overseas investors at $ 120,000. I’m sure the government will clean it up a little bit. Hire new CEO’s , breakdown its holdings and sell it to private entities or wealthy individual. – leytenian…

    I agree.. but other people see something wrong with the bailout. The same people will see something wrong if the feds did not bail out AIG at all… People will ascribe ill-motive, such as bailing out the rich people with the poor people’s money… but the feds sees it as saving the poor investment from total catastrophe.. They will not look into your position that the Feds make a good bargain/decision in taking over the AIG, fired the voracious CEOS and let the regulators run the company…

    From my standpoint, taking over a failed private company to prevent wholesale economic chaos is what a responsible government should do, unless one would to see chaos in the U.S. economy which incidentally, would even impact third world countries, one of which is P.I. 🙂

    • BrianB on September 22, 2008 at 9:46 pm

    eh ano ang n?

    • cvj on September 22, 2008 at 10:04 pm

    hindi ba iyong AIG bailout is saving the bathwater along with the baby ? – UP n grad

    Very apt analogy.

    • cvj on September 22, 2008 at 10:35 pm

    It’s supposed to be just a comedy skit, but this this video clip is tracking reality quite well…

    Interviewer: Surely the reality is the people that lent all this money [aka the subprime creditors] are being incredibly stupid!?

    Banker: Oh no, what was stupid was that, at some point, somebody asked how much money these houses were actually worth. If you hadn’t bothered to ask that question then everything would have gone on perfectly normal…

    Interviewer: I see, but now people are saying that the crisis is likely to turn into financial meltdown…can that be avoided?

    Banker: It can be avoided provided that the governments and central banks gave us (the financial speculators) back the money that we’ve lost.

    Interviewer: But isn’t that rewarding greed and stupidity?

    Banker: No, it’s rewarding what Prime Minister Gordon Brown called ‘the Ingenuity of the Market’. [Besides] we don’t want this money to spend on ourselves…we want this money just to get into the market so that we can carry on borrowing and lending as if nothing has happened without thinking too much about it…

    Interviewer: But if the worse came to the worse and you didn’t get this money…what then?

    Banker: Well then there’ll be another market crash and then i would say to you what people like me always say, it’s not us who will suffer, it’s your pension fund.

    That’s reality.

    • BrianB on September 22, 2008 at 10:49 pm

    Sabi ko na nga eh buwagin na yang market na yan. Wala pang taong magugutom.

    • jcc on September 22, 2008 at 10:56 pm

    i like pundits on this blog who call everyone stupid or in limbic clouds because you have a different take than them… 🙂

    despite the present millineum, no country has ever devised an ideal democratic process whereby in time of crisis the government goes back to the people for consultation and ask for referendum on the planned action on an impending crisis..

    Every government has so called emergency powers. The determination of whether the exercice of that power was called under the circumstances is never left to the people but to the institution and the people must act through that institution

    in the case of AIG bailout, the federal government has so acted pursuant to that legal duty… there is no mechanism in place which requires the Feds to ask for a referendum so the “people” will have a say on what to do with the impending economic crisis.

    it is like offering a referendum on whether the U.S. has to undertake a pre-emptive strike on a country determined to be inimical to her best interest.

    Unfortunately, the political geniuses of the past era and under our time are quite happy with the concept that a representative government can act through their elected leaders and the curtailment of abuse is limited only to the people being able to boot them out of office on election day. That is democracy enought for me. Other means would be risky if it would not result to outright anarchy. 🙂

    • cvj on September 22, 2008 at 11:23 pm

    Brian (at 10:49 pm), repudiating the market would mean repeating the mistake of the communist countries which, after all, collapsed much earlier (in 1989). Now its the turn of free market capitalism to collapse from its excesses. We need to develop a healthy respect for both Markets and Hierarchies (yes, that includes government) while being aware of its limits.

    • BrianB on September 22, 2008 at 11:36 pm

    Problem is personal greed whether for money or power always gets in the way of a good idea. Transparency and more “respect” for the “crowd” as that bestselling book calls “the people.” Next time.

    • BrianB on September 22, 2008 at 11:43 pm

    “Individual perceptions based on class contradictions actually speak more about limbic perceptions than anything else.

    Higher brain functions almost totally missing.

    We have to keep battling those limbic tendencies through higher brain functions.”

    We operate via groups. Advocacies are necessarily prejudicial to its opponents and they are “limbic” driven. Imagine using your higher brain functions on every personal decision, you would hardly move from your seat. Besides, you’ll need to have the power of mind control; otherwise it’s emotions and broad analyses that get the most votes.

    • PSI on September 22, 2008 at 11:43 pm

    cvj,

    Further to our earlier discussions on market vs. government failure, the U.S. (and now global) financial meltdown is what is really is a market failure.

    There was adequate (?) government regulation in the sense that the central banks knew what was going on (sub-prime mortgages, securitization, hedge funds, credit default swaps, ec)) but possibly did not realize the breadth and depth of it.

    Or maybe so trusted the market to regulate itself.

    • BrianB on September 22, 2008 at 11:44 pm

    post above for hvrds.

    • The Ca t on September 22, 2008 at 11:53 pm

    Mlq3

    One blogger posted in one blog that you are one the judges in the recently held Phil. Blogging Awards. I checked the Pba website, indeed you are in the ist.

    I like Filipino Voices but isn’t it irregular for a judge to endorse or promote a particular blog he likes?
    .

    • cvj on September 23, 2008 at 1:11 am

    PSI, in his defense of the free market, the economist Friedrich Hayek said that the market is the most efficient way to transmit and receive information about supply and demand in the form of prices. That’s why economies with communist governments which relied on central planning suffered shortages or overcapacity. I agree with him especially as he was vindicated by the collapse of communism in 1989.

    Unfortunately, just as governments can fail, markets can likewise do so. In the case of financial markets, this information coordination mechanism failed because of the way the incentives among the actors were structured (i.e. lenders being compensated for quantity of loans rather than quality). Moreover, the process of aggregating and repackaging and reselling these loans (i.e. ‘securitization’) which are then given ratings by the credit rating agencies resulted in loss of information about the true quality of these financial instruments.

    Market failure in this case is therefore synonymous with the breakdown in the collection and transmission of information. And where the market fails in this function, there is no choice but for government (or maybe NGO’s) to step in.

    BTW, addressing market failure (in terms of discovering and coordinating information) is also the reason why governments have to formulate and carry out (together with the private sector) industrial policy especially in developing countries.

    • UP n grad on September 23, 2008 at 1:48 am

    Information was flowing.

    Te evildoers 👿 — the shorts — had done their homework and “knew” enough to be betting against the Lehman’s and AIG’s who had overstepped.

    And yes, there were other financiers — the Leucadia’s and the Warren Buffetts and the Phil Gross’s — whose conservative bents (either “natural” to their persona or imposed by the nature of their incorporation papers) who dared not ……. go where no one has been before playing fast and aggressive with (in leytenian’s words) other people’s money.

    • cvj on September 23, 2008 at 2:14 am

    UPn, the ‘shorts’ entered late in the game. It was information loss that generated the bubble in the first place.

    • UP n grad on September 23, 2008 at 2:27 am

    cvj: I don’t know what you mean by late in the game but shorts (especially naked-shorts) are naturally slow. One should place “against”-bets only AFTER the excesses have become evident (based on the accounting methodology of the shorts).

    The natural tendency of a stock-price is up because “the market” assumes that corporation-management knows what they are doing AND that “good management” result in a rising stock-price.

    • cvj on September 23, 2008 at 2:44 am

    UPn, ‘late in the game’ means just that. By the time the subprime market collapsed, financial institutions had major exposures. It was more like a pyramid scam rather than a properly functioning market.

    The natural tendency of a stock-price is up because “the market” assumes that corporation-management knows what they are doing AND that “good management” result in a rising stock-price. – UPn grad

    I’m not aware that there is a ‘natural tendency’ for stock prices. Believing that there is such a tendency may have contributed to the bubble. Besides, we both have spent decades in the corporate sector so don’t you think that assuming ‘good management’ because ‘corporation-management knows what they are doing’ is naive?

    • BrianB on September 23, 2008 at 3:21 am

    cvj,

    information loss is intentional, isn’t it. It’s what drives the market in the first place. Most stock markets are overpriced, some way overpriced especially in europe and south america.

    How many times do people have to explain to other people that the market is psychology driven. What do they think it means? It’s this premise of greed that made this all happen. People are greedy yes, but do markets and corporate wealth have to ride on this greed? They should be forced to be more rational. Then maybe this could end world hunger.

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