Deposing a Speaker

DSC00034Update 2:17 pm: House showdown deferred. Talk is rife, however, that it might push through anyway, but without media coverage. Rep. Matias Defensor says the ruling coalition prefers a secret caucus in committee rooms, where congressmen will indicate where they stand should there be a division of the House; and that when the winner is known, they will then return to the Session Hall to formalize their choice, without having to engage in debate.

Quite a high-wire act. Until this morning, the deposing of the Speaker had an aura of inevitability not to mention, invincibility. A delay of 24 hours can give the de Venecia camp a second wind. Conversely, it can give the Palace more time to consolidate its forces. Defensor says, though, that their objective is to settle the leadership question by tomorrow at the latest. The primary consideration (see below) might actually be: can JDV muster the eighty-odd votes required, not to save his position, but to transmit the impeachment complaint to the Senate?

Sergio Apostol says the Palace is dangling appointment as ambassador to Washington or Secretary of Foreign Affairs to de Venecia (confirming previous scuttlebutt).

Rufus Rodriguez says if Nograles has the votes, they’ll join the bandwagon.

***

Over the weekend, there was posturing a-plenty: De Venecia, Nograles camps both say they have the votes. The best the Speaker could do was along the lines of JDV says he’s receiving many offers to join opposition.

He reportedly consulted former President Estrada who summoned an opposition meeting Sunday lunchtime. But that was worth a handful of votes at best. On the other hand, the leading Palace candidate for the speakership, Rep. Nograles, didn’t bother to show up at the Lakas leaders’ Palace golf-game.

Prior to that, he’d telegraphed that the Liberal Party and a big chunk of congressional neophytes had signed on to topple de Venecia.

The President, for her part, played alternately coy and helpless: Arroyo won’t stop sons on JDV ouster.

In its Sunday editorial, The son also rises, the Inquirer said that the apparent rebelliousness of the President’s sons was all an act.

Besides what the editorial pointed out, Mon Casiple in his blog entry Between two families traces the sore spots between the Speaker and the President:

The two protagonists–President Macapagal-Arroyo and JDV–have been dueling through proxies for some months now since the president broke her promise to step down in one year’s time from July 2005. The current stage started when the ZTE scandal broke out last year, involving JDV’s own son, Joey de Venecia. In December 2006, JDV was nearly unseated when his co-savior, Fidel Ramos, insisted on the supposed agreement in July 2005. He did a judo trick, going along with the Malacañang charter change agenda. In the process, FVR got elbowed out and was humiliated at the Lakas coalition showdown. However, the president’s men did not forget JDV’s “unreliability” and ambition for the top post. Their discontent fed into KAMPI’s own simmering grievance over its being sidelined for a long, long time from the speakership post, despite it being acknowledged as the president’s own party. Over time, the presidential (and JDV’s) argument for maintaining the rainbow coalition got fewer and fewer audience among them. Things got into a head in the last 2007 elections. The JDV camp found itself fighting for survival–not for speakership–but even for membership in the House. JDV got into a real fight with Dagupan mayor Benjie Lim for the Pangasinan’s 4th congressional seat. It was bruited later that the principal backers behind Lim included the First Gentleman and KAMPI. JDV won the fight (with FVR support) and later defended his speakership by invoking the continuity of the limping coalition. However, by that time, the trust between the coalition partners had all but disappeared. Malacañang concentrated in its hand all the pork barrel (and IRA) disbursements.

Back to Casiple: he ended his piece by saying further developments would be suggested by the results of the Palace golf game yesterday morning.

But as it turned out, Arroyo snubs Lakas golf game (this morning’s Inquirer editorial objects to the choice of gold, and the choices the various groups such as the Liberals have made, to go along with the Palace-led ouster of de Venecia). However, one source, quoting a conversation with Dato Arroyo on Saturday, said of the so-called snub,

ala raw golf chuchu much les wid tabalko talaga sa sked ng nanay nya. Napapirma raw nya rachel arenas ysday. 140 na but targeting 20 to 40 more.

And so, instead of a Sunday meeting, the Speaker was told he should go to the Palace on Monday, either at 10 or 11 am. That gave the Palace time to round up the “20 or 40 more,” which refers to pledges to vote against the Speaker (see Pals, foes switch to battle mode as JDV fate hangs). The Monday meeting, held at the Palace Park, was expected to take all morning.

Casiple also said that the escalating fight between de Venecia and Arroyo carries with it the risk of tearing apart the ruling coalition. This is something I tackle in my column, Aliens versus Predators.

News like this –Eastern Samar Gov. Evardone quits Lakas party– is a sign of things to come:

“I can better serve my constituents if I join other political parties … I want to join a political party that I think is close to President Arroyo’s heart,” explained Evardone, who is spokesperson for the Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines, a group of local government executives. “Where the President is, I will be there,” he said.

Lakas has to consider if it will keep an increasingly decorative speakership.

As for de Venecia himself, Conrado de Quiros zeroes in on the problem: those still loyal to the President view him as disloyal and dangerous; those opposed to the administration can’t forgive him for killing two impeachments and giving the President a new lease on political life in 2005. An interesting tactical point comes from Joel Rocamora, as quoted in UNTV: impeachment might suddenly get a new lease on life.

The Speaker made a choice in July 2005, gambling on achieving parliamentary government by giving the President a chance to survive. FVR gambled on the same thing. The President eliminated FVR as a power in Lakas and then proceeded to cultivate the Speaker to kill impeachment efforts. The President rewarded them by using the resources of her office to try to kill Lakas. When the Speaker’s son decided to spill the beans later rather than sooner, the Speaker agonized over it and tried to save himself even if it meant he had to distance himself from the son who was trying to do the right thing, for whatever reason.

Leadership requires numbers but it also requires showing true grit; this is how politicians become statesmen. The Speaker has had repeated opportunities to finally choose the path of statesmanship but chose the low road each and every time. The simple lesson here is that if anyone is going to be held accountable for anything, it’s not the President or her family; it will be allies who, once they show some independence of mind, will be crushed.

In the blogosphere, The Lonely Vampire Chronicles compiles relevant headlines; smoke has a bone to pick with the opposition concerning the speakership fight; and Uniffors advises congressmen to take the money -and squeal. The Equalizer points to Rep. Mikey Arroyo saying it’s all about ZTE. Brain Cell Exercises puts it well:

This recent skirmish in the House of Representatives only goes to show several things: first, that when blood relatives squeal on Malacañang, one should be ready for the death of his/her political dynasty. Second, that there are no permanent allies in politics — only permanent interests. I believe that Nograles and his allies do have the numbers to finally topple JDV. But considering this man’s trapo nature, it’s just going to be another case of one set of rascals being replaced by another set of rascals. Let’s just see how much of a Malacañang lapdog he’s going to be. If the issue on charter change gets revived for the nth time in the House of Representatives under Nograles’ term as Speaker, then my theory is proven: that Nograles has been bestowed with the all-mighty Malacañang shield of power.

Pinoy x-sa KSA points out,

If you are a father, you know very well that you cannot control your sons and daughters. If you are a son or daughter, you know you cannot be controlled, 100%, at all, by your parents. For me, it was important that JDV III exposed the NBN deal.

Agree!

And Ricelander’s Blog reflects on unbridgeable opinions.

200 comments

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    • Jon Mariano on February 5, 2008 at 9:34 am

    It’s not surprising nobody shed a tear for JDV (except his family perhaps). I’m wondering if he still can resurrect himself or he’ll be like FVR, all spent forces.

    • benc on February 5, 2008 at 9:37 am

    Pahabol conspiracy theory 1 (pero plausible). JDV wanted a shift to Parliamentary, where he could probably become prime minister (dream on!). In return, JDV will deliver an obedient Congres to GMA. Since GMA did not successfully push the Parliamentary shift, JDV got antsy.

    • cvj on February 5, 2008 at 9:48 am

    Kabayan (at 9:18am), i agree with your points. Unfortunately, the hoped for “vigorous push of different sectors of society against this evil agenda” is just not there because of the let’s move on and let’s wait for 2010 mindsets.

    • qwert on February 5, 2008 at 10:07 am

    “Unfortunately, the hoped for “vigorous push of different sectors of society against this evil agenda” is just not there because of the let’s move on and let’s wait for 2010 mindsets.” – cvj

    … and GMA knew about this, this is a calculated move coming from a shrewd politician. The 2010 presidentiables will become shooed politicians, they don’t know up to now the name of the game.

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 10:10 am

    cvj (at 9:48am), true, the “let’s move on and let’s wait for 2010” mindset is getting prevalent and is actually something which the power hungry in this administration wants.

    The opposition, civil society and even the free press cannot allow themselves such complacency. They should more than ever pound even harder against the “coming of the night.” A major strategic objective (i.e. deposing JDV) is reached and a lot of the other objectives I mentioned are either partially or even fully fulfilled. For those who experienced the Marcosian Martial Law, they know only too well the consequences of this will be.

    Watch out for years 2009 to 2010. But then again when many people get wise, they may jump the timetable to 2008 since someone just “spilled the beans” so to speak.

    • Mike on February 5, 2008 at 10:38 am

    now he is moving towards the point of no return and burning the bridges behind him. – Bencard

    And then:

    http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/nation/view/20080205-116822/Gonzalez-He-has-burned-his-bridges-with-the-President

    I knew it all along!! Bencard=Raul Gonzalez!!

    😀

    • Mike on February 5, 2008 at 10:42 am

    Kabayan, I salute you. Your analysis is the most succinct and persuasive statement of our current situation that I have yet come across. I have no doubt your assertions will be borne out by future events–to our detriment and dismay, unless people act decisively now.

  1. this only goes to show that GMA was inaccurate when she confessed to the world media that she is a “Good Economist, Very Bad Politician” http://www.newsflash.org/2004/02/hl/hl106723.htm

    from what i see, this move, if it were her design, is a mark of being a student of realpolitik, qualifying her to be one of the shrewdest politician this country ever had.

    if, as Kabayan says, these actions lead to the ‘replacement’ of democracy in this country, so be it. we have been experimenting with our kind of democracy for more than 20 years and most of you would agree that it is not as ‘romantic’ as we wished it could be.

    who knows, she might be able to pull of a kind of autocracy similar to singapore’s

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 10:58 am

    Mike, I am glad that you and other bloggers on this site appreciate the analysis of the scenario I had just described. I forgot to add number 9…

    9. Make inroads and as far as possible to try to control or at least heavily influence the Judicial Branch of government.

    … Once the three branches of government is controlled, power is complete and a de facto Martial Law can easily be established. Whether this has already been done in part, I leave bloggers to decide.

  2. napaka obvious at napaka halata na, pero ba’t di makita nang mga tanga?

    ngingisi-ngisi ngayon si Nograles, di ba nya alam, ngayon pa lang, bilang na rin ang buhay nya?

    sabi ni mlq3, GMA respects no bounds, and will cross all limits. pero may mas glaring na ugali si GMA. paulit-ulit, walang pakli, perfect to the dot, you can always expect her to do this: bite the hand that fed (or protected her).

    de Quiros’ portrayal of GMA as the proverbial scorpion who rode on a tortoise’s back is very apt.

    said the scorpion: but it is just in my nature to sting…

    let us look at the list of tortoises:

    Cory, FVR, the LEFT (who colluded w/her in EDSA II), and now of course, JDV.

    once Nograles fulfills his role, which is to push through Charter Change, you can expect the scorpion to “sting” again. and once congress transforms into a parliament and elects GMA as PM, expect parliament to be dissolved.

    i think only the praetorian guards will be left to enjoy the fruits of their labor.

    once again, making all those wishing to leave the philippines right in their decision. leave now before its too late. but dnt head for the US. that country is headed in a worser direction. head elsewhere. but leave now and never look back.

    • UP n student on February 5, 2008 at 11:07 am

    mike and kabayan: are you doing a call for EDSA marches? I believe there is a jailed Senator who will be interested in the details, but you may need to remind yourself that passive aggression does not work. You really should avoid being clearly misunderstood or you will be alone together.

  3. before July ends, Charter Change will push through

  4. we have 2 more years before my predicted revolution

  5. “sabi ni mlq3, GMA respects no bounds, and will cross all limits. pero may mas glaring na ugali si GMA. paulit-ulit, walang pakli, perfect to the dot, you can always expect her to do this: bite the hand that fed (or protected her).”

    well, GMA’s ambition is more admirable than the kind of loyalty you prefer. when GMA’s loyalty to JDV goes in the way of your goals for the country, that loyalty will have to go. so i think its better to answer that in MLQ’s words as well.

    “my loyalty to my friends end where my loyalty to the country begins”

    GMA is truly determined to achieve her vision for the country, and she will do whatever means necessary to realize that goal, and that is admirable. realpolitik at its finest.

    • inodoro ni emilie on February 5, 2008 at 11:38 am

    see how the edsa2-made cookie crumbles. then only a few saw how the cookie monster baked it and is now eating it, too.

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 11:43 am

    UP n student,

    The real question is …

    Where are you now in your current organization, how well informed are you, your classmates, your members, your neighbors of the fact?

    What are you doing now? How do you intend to let others know of the insidious evil creeping in our society?

    Just like in a story, a frog that is being boiled in small increments of increases in temperature never really realizes that he is already boiled until it’s too late. It simply slips into unconsciousness until dead and thoroughly boiled. Existing Philippine society seems to be that frog.

    I roughly assume that you are a UP student,… the real question here is … What would YOU do?

    Don’t worry UP n student. I’ll never be alone.

    ———–

    DevilsAdvc8,

    Leaving the Philippines to some greener pasture are for those have the capability, finances, contacts, skill and luck to leave. For the vast majority … well…

    ———–

    For those who wish to have a good grasp of what is really happening right now … study the Marcos regime before and after declaration of Martial Law.

    Study what happened to the political opponents of Marcos, the media, the rich people who were not his lapdogs, his loss of grip of power as it slips to his relatives and generals, and of course subtle foreign intervention.

    History has a tendency to repeat itself, unless fully understood and countermeasures be taken.

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 11:48 am

    Liam Tinio,

    You said “GMA is truly determined to achieve her vision for the country, and she will do whatever means necessary to realize that goal, and that is admirable. realpolitik at its finest.”

    That is exactly what the dictator Ferdinand Marcos thought of, and for himself. So did Idi Amin. Gloria is simply showing her true color.

    • inodoro ni emilie on February 5, 2008 at 11:49 am

    leave now before its too late.

    devils, shouldn’t it be: stay and drive those evil away?

    • UP n student on February 5, 2008 at 11:54 am

    So what will Honasan do? And what will Ping Lacson do?

    DevilsAdvc8 makes a suggestion for the hireables that they who can to join Jon Mariano, cvj, benign0 and trueNorth vic and and leave for overseas.

    Is he also asking those with assets to leave?
    ————
    But I see things differently from DevilsAdvc8. We partially agree on migration. Like DevilsAdvc8, I say that if going to Australia or Singapore makes sense for a person, more power. Everyone has a responsibility to paddle his own canoe. But do it more because of a desire to do better and less from fear and a desire to leave a sinking ship.

    As for 2010, my perception is that 2010 becomes a demonstration of a maturing electorate. A peaceful change of administration in 2010 will be very positive for the Philippines, and better follows.

    DIFFERENT FOLKS, DIFFERENT STROKES. And beware the opportunists. So what will Honasan do?

    • cvj on February 5, 2008 at 12:00 pm

    Kabayan, yeah the boiling frog analogy fits our situation. We have an inactive and/or co-opted Civil Society that allows the elite politicians, businessmen and their military thugs subvert our Institutions while seeking comfort in an electoral calendar that will most likely be subverted at some point. With the ‘decent folks’ in the middle class out of the way, and given our highly unequal Society, our future will be more like present-day Pakistan or Kenya.

    • Balimbing on February 5, 2008 at 12:02 pm

    DJB, just in case you glance by this way: check out kabayan’s comments on what gloria is up to. You fit nicely on item 7.

    • cvj on February 5, 2008 at 12:05 pm

    As for 2010, my perception is that 2010 becomes a demonstration of a maturing electorate. A peaceful change of administration in 2010 will be very positive for the Philippines, and better follows. – UPn Student

    It’s the difference between World War I-style trench warfare versus World War II-style blitzkreig. You’re making 2010 to be some sort of Maginot Line while the other side is already positioned to attack from the rear (as they always do).

  6. @Kabayan

    “That is exactly what the dictator Ferdinand Marcos thought of, and for himself. So did Idi Amin.”

    so did Lee Kwan Yew and the Chinese in the contemporary period

    • UP n student on February 5, 2008 at 12:15 pm

    cvj and DevilsAdvc8:
    Also to remember:
    One, revolutions, CHANGES and chaos are supposed to provide immense opportunities to the survivor. There is the classic market saying — “buy” when there is blood in the streets.
    Two: Statistically, the odds of dying during an administration-change is low. This suggests that many among the nimble-on-their-feet will not only survive, they should thrive after.

    Wasn’t this one of the lessons in the Elder-Gokongwei address?
    —–
    Maginot Line is so French it is already a dead-premise even before it is put to practice. And again, cvj, different folks, different strokes is just reminder of differences in opinions.

    And if it is another World War II, not to worry. The Americans will come to the rescue. 😉

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 12:19 pm

    cvj, you are correct, they would not wait till 2010. As it seems that their actions (which speak of their strategy and motives) are now currently exposed, they would likely do their best to hasten their timetable, unless of course the decent citizenry successfully foils their strategy. Opportunists, fence-sitters, and last-minute vultures should also be observed and rooted out when the time comes.

    • grd on February 5, 2008 at 12:20 pm

    mike and kabayan: are you doing a call for EDSA marches? I believe there is a jailed Senator who will be interested in the details, but you may need to remind yourself that passive aggression does not work. You really should avoid being clearly misunderstood or you will be alone together…UP n student

    don’t forget cvj.

    • mlq3 on February 5, 2008 at 12:23 pm
      Author

    benc, i don’t think it’s confusing at all. what goes around comes around. not just revolutions, but administrations, devour their own children. jdv gambled on gma. she gambled on disposing with him. his gamble failed, her gamble paid off. the house, in voting to get rid of jdv, got the satisfaction of toppling its own leader and further weakening the speakership, because now it has three speakers: dato and mikey arroyo, and prospero nograles. but the congressmen are happy and the president can do victory laps.

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 12:28 pm

    Liam Tinio,

    Lee Kwan Yew surrendered his power; Marcos and Idi Amin did not. Gloria is not the type who would surrender her power either, she would actually lie and overturn her earlier decision just to extend her power. Remember how she announced it in public that she would not run for presidency again? Later she overturned her own decision, ran for reelection, then came Garci scandal and a host of cover-ups then the rest is history. It is highly unlikely for her to loosen her grasp for power. Power can be highly addictive and those addicted to power would desire absolute power.

    Observe the trend in the years that recently passed if her administration moves toward the 9 strategic items I mentioned above, and decide for yourself where this would likely lead to.

    • UP n student on February 5, 2008 at 12:29 pm

    Kabayan: What is an appropriate penalty for the crime of being a fence-sitter?

    • nha on February 5, 2008 at 12:29 pm

    isang malaking karma sa kanilang mag-ama,,kung hindi sila gumawa ng kalokohan e di wala sanang karma..karma lang un

  7. @UPnStudent

    i agree

    surprisingly, we are currently displaying a maturing electorate with more and more politicians giving emphasis on taking the endorsements of political parties, although it isnt as perfect as in other leading democracies like in germany, france and in europe.

    the re-emergence of old political parties like NP and LP and putting much importance on voting as a block party on certain issues. this is definitely unlike the Ramos and Estrada times where politics tend to gravitate in a large extent on individuals and personalities.

    now, we see functioning political parties on the national scene, though not based on ideologies but interests. though local politics is pretty much the same, its still a start and is arguably a positive evolution from personality based politics of the 90s.

    • UP n student on February 5, 2008 at 12:32 pm

    Kabayan : Is fence-sitting penalty to be a ten-peso fine, ten push-ups or pull out the nails from all ten fingers? Some people may not want to fence-sit once they get to know you better.

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 12:55 pm

    UP n student,

    In the first place the definition of fence-sitters may be problematic. To put limits to this, in my opinion, the penalty for fence-sitters [which if I may be allowed to loosely call them as corrupt “balimbings” holding key public office positions who arbitrarily shift support to a winning political force in order to uphold their selfish interest] must be disqualification from serving in public office, whether it be an appointed or elected position; not to mention will automatically be part of the normal fine-tooth comb policy of credible investigation of ill-gotten wealth (which also incur a separate penalty.)

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 12:59 pm

    Discussions regarding a “maturing electorate” and “reemergence of old political parties” is moot if a dictatorship or authoritarian rule is installed.

    • Mike on February 5, 2008 at 1:02 pm

    GMA is truly determined to achieve her vision for the country, and she will do whatever means necessary to realize that goal, and that is admirable. realpolitik at its finest. – Liam Tinio

    That “vision” is what I am worried about. I fear it is one riddled with Congressmen-for-hire, more Garcis, more Diosdado Macapagal Avenues, and more ZTEs. But then you don’t have a problem with that, do you? (“replacement of democracy…so be it”)

    so did Lee Kwan Yew and the Chinese in the contemporary period

    The problem is that you cannot choose what kind of dictator you get, once you’ve installed him/her. Ika nga, no return, no exchange (at least, without great effort). But I think I understand your attitude: as long as the government doesn’t interfere with business, democracy be damned, eh? But if you equate this adminstration with that of Lee Kwan Yew or the Chinese Communist Party, I think you are making a large qualitative mistake.

  8. @Kabayan

    Lee Kwan Yew did surrender his power to a groomed subordinate, but he did so only when he has done his job.

    Gloria Arroyo is yet to prove anything and do what she wants; to make this country a first world country.

    If you would look closely, Marcos sought perpetuity in power but his thrust to elevate the Philippines is largely based on social programs like feeding and health care in reaction to growing communism and the previous Macapagal Presidency and building audacious infrastructure, a program of government that cannot possibly move the economy forward.

    While GMA on the other hand has continuously sought to perpetuate her power, in order to put in place the necessary macro economic fundamentals towards economic growth. and we have seen her worth: the economy is up, inflation is tamed, stock markets are high and we enjoy relative prominence world wide.

    we have a populist president on one hand and we have an economist on the other. so why assign the same traits and attributes?

    as i see, president would do everything she can for the Republic. i think, she can withstand the thought of not being a populist but she cant withstand the idea of being a bad economist. which is as a whole definitely better for the country.

    • Kabayan on February 5, 2008 at 1:10 pm

    Liam Tinio,

    No person aiming for dictatorship, destroys democratic institutions and has a history of cover-ups can ever be called “better for the country”

  9. Liam Tinio, i wait while you choke on your words.

    • jude on February 5, 2008 at 1:23 pm

    While I am very sure that Prospero Nograles, De Venecia’s successor as speaker, will be even more unscrupulous and corrupt than De Venecia himself, De Venecia has no one to blame but himself. He allowed the Arroyo’s to plunder and run havoc, steadfastly defending them when it was convenient for him to do so.

    Of course, De Venecia didn’t do these things without extracting his pound of flesh. He may have allowed the Arroyo kin to have a say on the pork barrel, but De Venecia kept a good chunk of it for himself and for his minions.

    It was a big farce, laughable if it weren’t so creepy, to hear both De Venecia and the Arroyo camp mouthing slogans like “moral revolution” or “a change for reform”. Neither morality nor reform have any relevance here, except to disguise raw arrogance and greed.

    De Venecia overstepped his boundaries when he allowed his son to sour-grape publicly over the ZTE contract. Apparently, it wasn’t only Abalos who wanted a golden handshake upon his retirement. JDV had his own aspirations as well. He had once tried, but failed, to secure a windfall through the rail project with the Chinese. Perhaps JDV’s hubris led him to believe that the GMA Administration would give him, through his son, the ZTE project as a gilded bone for his canine servility. But it wasn’t meant to be. Maybe JDV had outlived his usefulness. And there were others, like Big Mike, Sleazy Ricky and Meek Ben who had more access to the source of power. And so, like a tragic figure, JDV was thrown to the wolves. Sadly, for him, his blind ambition, his deceitfulness, his greed and, finally, his conceit, all led to his downfall.

    While JDV may threaten to become an opposition figure or a fiscalizer, he doesn’t have the credibility, the moral fiber nor the strength of character to lead a crusade. He will be a lonely, forgotten, perhaps even disdained figure. JDV is about compromise, reciprocity, backroom deals, distributing the spoils and even capitulation. JDV is not about principles, integrity nor consistency. He may be an all-too-willing tool for the opposition, but he has so compromised himself that he will only create a tiny ripple, historically and in the future.

  10. Is he also asking those with assets to leave?

    no. let them rot in here along with their assets and rent-seeking asses.

    but of course we all know the moneyed have always lived with just one foot in the country and the other overseas. they are always the first ones to leave at the slightest hint of trouble. that’s why they’re also the least who care about reforms so long as they can gorge on their feasts.

    my message is to the middle class. yes. those who are able to and those who wish to. don’t burn yourselves out investing in a country which doesn’t invest back in you. simply put, there is no ROI in building your future here.

    my message is, let the system collapse in on itself.

    • kimosabe27 on February 5, 2008 at 1:25 pm

    To JDV:

    So, how’s life in the gutter?

    • UP n student on February 5, 2008 at 1:28 pm

    Kabayan and Mike:
    Many of the points you raise are based on the premise that 2010 brings a dictatorship. The MAGIC OF 2010 is that it is premised on transition of power based on the rules specified in the Constitution. The current Constitution specifies term-limits which one would think will disallow rulers-in-perpetuity.
    It is evident that the optimism that Liam displays in GMA is also premised on his expectation that she – GMA – follows the Constitution in the same manner that she – GMA — hides behind the Constitution and its impeachment-rules.
    Discussions about a maturing electorate make sense. Discussions about a maturing electorate do not make sense only for those goons whose intent is to discard and disrespect and prevent the wishes of a maturing electorate to be expressed. These may be goons affiliated to those who are outside power or these may be goons affiliated to those who are in power, but they are goons nonetheless.

    • Mike on February 5, 2008 at 1:34 pm

    UP n student,

    The current Constitution specifies term-limits which one would think will disallow rulers-in-perpetuity.

    That’s right: the *current* Constitution.

  11. It is a no-brainer to expect the unexpected in Pinoy politics.Here are The Equalizer’s 10 bold predictions of the aftermath of the ouster of Joe De Venecia from the speakership:

    1)The Lakas Party is officially dead.

    2)The exodus of Lakas stalwarts to Gloria’s Kampi party.

    3)Kampi will now be the dominant party.

    4)FVR and JDV will be completely marginalized.

    5)Expect more bombs and explosive exposes from JDV.But will he be credible after
    remaining silent all these years???

    6)Ronnie Puno will emerge as the most powerful political kingpin because of Kampi.

    7)Nograles will spearhead another CHA-CHA to extend Gloria’s hold on power beyond 2010.

    8)The political opposition will exploit the JDV ouster.

    9)There will be political instability AGAIN!Emergency rule again?

    10)No elections in 2010.

    Who wants to bet?

    • Mike on February 5, 2008 at 1:35 pm

    Equalizer,

    There may be elections in 2010…PARLIAMENTARY elections.

    • inodoro ni emilie on February 5, 2008 at 1:36 pm

    my message is to the middle class. yes. those who are able to and those who wish to. don’t burn yourselves out investing in a country which doesn’t invest back in you. simply put, there is no ROI in building your future here.

    my message is, let the system collapse in on itself.

    devils, i don’t understand why you are providing the middle class an escape chute when their silence and indifference have contributed largely to the decay of the situation. if the system collapses, let them crumble with it; if they do not want the system to collapse–i say, stay and hold on, but drive those evils away!

    • anthony scalia on February 5, 2008 at 1:37 pm

    to those drooling for another people power:

    in 1986 its JPE

    in 2001 its Chavit

    in 2008 its…..JDV?

    JPE and Chavit were insiders, in the inner circle of power, when they turned against the reigning powers. JDV fits that description.

    if the opposition couldn’t get JDV to their side, mga engot talaga sila. JDV opening a pandora’s box is more than enough to offset the ‘ka-engotan’ of the opposition

    a ‘balimbing na JDV’ is a crisis much bigger than ‘Hello Garci’.

    the opposition should learn from their blunder in ‘Hello Garci’ – it was a ‘game’ gloria didn’t win but the opposition lost (to use basketball terms)

    isa sa mga problema ng opposition ngayon, if they can get JDV to cooperate without JDV becoming the undisputed ‘opposition leader’. papayag kaya si JDV na hanggang ‘pagkanta’ lang?

    abangan!

  12. the house, in voting to get rid of jdv, got the satisfaction of toppling its own leader and further weakening the speakership, because now it has three speakers: dato and mikey arroyo, and prospero nograles.

    mlq3, don’t you mean destroying the republic? (whatever that means) because now it has only 2 branches of govt instead of three. it isn’t 3 speakers, but one lady – now both speaker and president.

    and who says we can lay complacent on Melo’s appointment? perhaps the Melo commission was just a farce, meant to portray Melo as some kind of independent justice.

    ah, the tragedy of it all. i wasn’t born yet when Marcos declared martial law. but to see the same events which transpired on those years happening now –

    we’re only lacking someone personifying Ninoy. perhaps he (or she) will come out later when the arrests comes. and then the epiphany when one gets solitary confinement. must be nice if it happens to Cayetano (or even funnier to one of the pro-arroyo bishops). twisted poetic justice.

    • kimosabe27 on February 5, 2008 at 1:38 pm

    My oh my, vengeance indeed is a viand best served cold.

    I remember those agonizing days during the botched impeachment attempts when every critical move made by the opposition is thwarted by the wheeling-dealing of this cretinous, lowlife of a man.

    Belat, a thousand times belat to you o big-eared buffoon.

    • tonio on February 5, 2008 at 1:38 pm

    such fun. 🙂

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