San Luis, the new Marcoleta?

New impeach rap filed vs Arroyo:

A three-page complaint accusing Arroyo of betrayal of public trust was lodged by lawyer Roberto Pulido before the office of House Secretary General Roberto Nazareno at 5 p.m., said Representative Joel Villanueva of the Citizens Battle Against Corruption party-list.

Laguna Representative Edgar San Luis, an administration ally, endorsed the complaint that accuses Arroyo of inaction despite being informed by a Cabinet official of alleged bribery attempts in the scandal-tainted national broadband network (NBN) deal, said Villanueva.

Pulido earlier filed a complaint against House Speaker Jose de Venecia Jr. before the House ethics committee, accusing him of using his office to help his businessman-son corner the NBN project.

San Luis meanwhile is a member of a faction of the administration Kabalikat ng Malayang Pilipino led by Camarines Sur Representative Luis Villafuerte, who is accused of plotting the ouster of De Venecia.

The President issued a helpful statement from India:

Arroyo also admitted for the first time that former socioeconomics secretary Romulo Neri had informed her of the alleged bribery attempt of erstwhile elections chief Benjamin Abalos Sr.

“Yeah, I can confirm that,” said Arroyo.

Perfectly orchestrated and timed!

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328 comments

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    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 1:10 am

    Do I smell some desperation in the air?

    Googling is allowed….hahahahaha

    • Harry on October 8, 2007 at 1:18 am

    poor father gomez
    poor father burgos
    poor father zamora

    your names were dragged in here and yet the person doesn’t know when you died and became heroes

    harry c

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 1:19 am

    “Makes me think. Did you see any Oakwood Mutineer with dilapidated shoes? Did you see any Oakwood Mutineer carrying a rusting Gun? Did you see any Oakwood Mutinner wearing Uniform with holes? Did you see any Oakwood Mutineer even carrying worn-out Bags? By the looks of it, they were armed to the teeth with M4-variation Carbines, some M-16’s, some other automatic weapons. They were wearing the same camouflage uniform, new shoes, new Motorola Two-Way Radios, new backpacks. Now, where did they get these things?”

    You have to understand, they were going to Makati, to a nice hotel at that, they had to look their Sunday’s best.
    As for the mutiny or whatever that was, I surprised myself. Its not the way I would stage a mutiny or a coup, a hotel is the least possible target. Come to think of it, even the “father” of mutineers Honasan was surprised by it (honestly) its not the way. So I had this impression that they were just doing a sit down strike or in this case “coffee in the hotel lobby” strike, with all those cameras, Karah, even you would put on your makeup and try to look good if you were them. It was not until Trillanes hooked up with Estrada that I…

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 1:19 am

    cvj Do you know how to respect the opinions of others or it’s just that wanna force your own opinion on other people? – Karah

    No one (not even me) has a right to have the wrong opinion. You have to be able to justify and defend it. Of course, you (and me), have the right to free expression (unless of course you give it up as you seem to be willing to do).

    Teach me about history since you’re quite adept by the looks of it. I’m an avid learner. – Karah

    That’s the right attitude. You see, it’s not just the masa that needs to be educated. The middle class (that means you and me) also need to be educated. Anyway, good thing Manolo is a historian so we both can learn from him.

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 1:20 am

    Karah,

    You have to understand, they were going to Makati, to a nice hotel at that, they had to look their Sunday’s best.
    As for the mutiny or whatever that was, I surprised myself. Its not the way I would stage a mutiny or a coup, a hotel is the least possible target. Come to think of it, even the “father” of mutineers Honasan was surprised by it (honestly) its not the way. So I had this impression that they were just doing a sit down strike or in this case “coffee in the hotel lobby” strike, with all those cameras, Karah, even you would put on your makeup and try to look good if you were them. It was not until Trillanes hooked up with Estrada that I…

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 1:22 am

    cvj,

    Our country is in its present situation now because we have too much freedom.. and it is being ABUSED and MISUSED.

    The communists are hiding behind the freedoms of speech and expression to do their destructive work. Conducting paralyzing ralies and strikes disguised as figthing for basic rights.

    Power hungry people are using those freedom to create chaos and disrupt the normal operations of the government. And use it to try and grab power for themselves.

    Congressmen and Senators also abuse freedom of speech by using it to get back at their personal and political opponents. Hurling nasty, and oftentimes unproven allegations during their “priviledged speeches” Nene Pimentel for example during the ZTE investigation brought out the “extramarital affairs” of Ben Abalos, which is totally irrelevant to the isuue being discussed. Pimentel did that because he was mad at Abalos for his son’s (Koko) failure to get into the senate.

    The only freedom we should have is the freedom to crack jokes. Its the freedom I will fight for to the end… hahahahahahahaha

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 1:23 am

    karah,

    Relax. Take it easy. Now even your smilies scare me. Sige ka, boys are afraid of feisty girls. If I had known earlier that my wife would be this feisty I would have run for the hills!

    • Bencard on October 8, 2007 at 1:30 am

    ramrod, fwiw, my young, pma-grad brother in law is young in age but traditional in principles. he is a real soldier, a spartan, who knows the virtues of sacrifice, patience, loyalty, obedience, and respect for superiors. he is a protector, not only of his own families and loved ones, but his comrades in arms, fellow officers, and the nation in general.

    he leaves politics to the politicians, except his right to vote; governing to the government; religion to the clergy; but most especialy, the rule of law to the courts of the land.

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 1:32 am

    harry, you can google the date as good as me, but just to explain why i chose that particular event, here’s an excerpt from Mabini’s account of the Philippine Revolution:

    The friars wanted to make an example of Burgos and his companions so that the Filipinos should be afraid to go against them from then on. But that patent injustice, that official crime, aroused not fear but hatred of the friars and of the regime that supported them, and a profound sympathy and sorrow for the victims. This sorrow worked a miracle: it made the Filipinos realize their condition for the first time. Conscious of pain, and thus conscious of life, they asked themselves what kind of a life they lived. The awakening was painful, and working to stay alive more painful still, but one must live. How? They did not know, and the desire to know, the anxiety to learn, overwhelmed and took possession of the youth of the Philippines. The curtain of ignorance woven diligently for centuries was rent at last: fiat lux, let there be light, would not be long in coming, the dawn of a new day was nearing.

    Before that, there such consciousness did not exist in a significant enough level.

    • karah on October 8, 2007 at 1:33 am

    cvj I don’t think you answered my question. DO YOU KNOW HOW TO RESPECT THE OPINIONS OF OTHERS? A simple YES or NO 😀 answer is quite hard to come by these days. And so? Don’t evade or skirt my quetions with your reasons. Even the FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION is not absolute and has its own limitations. Yes, I am willing to give 😛

    So, when did the FILIPINO CONSCIOUSNESS was formed? The day, month, and year please? You 😀 And please, don’t pass my question to Manolo. You’re a grown man, right? Sure, we all need to be educated, who doesn’t?

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 1:36 am

    ramrod,

    They chose Oakwood to gather the maximum attention, not just locally but also internationally. And also to create an atmoshpere of fear and instability in the country’s main financial district.

    Its not the mutineers who chose the venue, its the masterminds.

    • Harry on October 8, 2007 at 1:37 am

    cvj:

    how do you gauge the trend on filipino consciousness as you say from the time the gomburza fathers died up to the present? is this something quantifiable or just a vague idea of yours?

    harry c

    • pete on October 8, 2007 at 1:37 am

    cvj,

    That’s a good basis for your proposition.

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 1:38 am

    Bibeth, so i take it that it is not only your own freedoms that you want to take away but the other parties that you mentioned (i.e. the communists, the Senators etc.) as well? Karah takes me to task because i tell her straight that i think her opinion is wrong. You on the other hand want to go further. You want to silence those who disagree with you. Which is worse? I think that reflects very well the typical middle class mindset that needs to be changed. Do you think education will help?

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 1:42 am

    cvj,

    If silencing those who criticize and destabilize the government is what it takes to restore the pride and dignity of this nation then so be it.

    If taking out the hooligans and anarchists like the NPA is needed to restore peace and order.. then so be it.

    Just don’t take my freedom to crack jokes. There will be trouble.

    • pete on October 8, 2007 at 1:42 am

    ramrod,

    Re Oakwood,

    you disagreed with Magadalos execution. I don’t agree with the mode of action no matter the execution. It’s what doomed the oakwood experiment.

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 1:47 am

    “he leaves politics to the politicians, except his right to vote; governing to the government; religion to the clergy; but most especialy, the rule of law to the courts of the land”- bencard

    Might as well. This means there is still hope in the younger generation. Ours I admit was a tainted one, but it was a generation that toppled the Marcos’ regime. Though in hindsight, such means could be used by other forces with less nobler objectives. I am praying for sobriety, its only with peaceful, civilized, and adherence to democratic processes that we can move progressively forward.

    • karah on October 8, 2007 at 1:49 am

    Ram I didn’t think it was a serious “mutiny.” I even thought it might have only been a drill. Taking over a posh Condotel is just fantastic. It was better for them to have taken over the MRT (during the rush hour in the morning, that is). It was just funny.

    I would have wanted some action – a siege or an assault maybe. The Mutineers rigged the place right? They were even seen on Cam rolling wires here and there. What a comedy. They got all the MEDIA ATTENTION they were asking for alright. Then what? They eventually surrendered without a drop of blood.

    • pete on October 8, 2007 at 1:51 am

    karah,

    You are raring for a action. I’ll file a petition in congress thru our rep for the repeal of the RVAT return to pre-RVAT level and coverage. What’s your take on it? Shouldn’t we demand that the taxes we pay be reduced until corruption is reduced? or until GMA goes on leave?

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 1:56 am

    “I would have wanted some action – a siege or an assault maybe. The Mutineers rigged the place right? They were even seen on Cam rolling wires here and there. What a comedy. They got all the MEDIA ATTENTION they were asking for alright. Then what? They eventually surrendered without a drop of blood.” – karah

    Karah sure knows her entertainment

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 1:56 am

    “you disagreed with Magadalos execution. I don’t agree with the mode of action no matter the execution. It’s what doomed the oakwood experiment.”-pete

    A failure is always a mistake. There can be no more strong “coup” like movements in the military, its split up like a ripe watermelon. If you notice the latest “mutiny” events do not even qualify as mutiny just “conduct unbecoming of an officer and a gentleman.” They were just airing out their grievances though misguided they may be. As for the Magdalo, I had some doubts, but sometimes you have to take sides, I have never been a fence sitter. They did that knowing it was career suicide, they had everything to lose. On the other hand, someone became a senator…somehow I get the feeling there was deception here somewhere…

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 1:57 am

    Karah, i respect you as a person and i respect your freedom/right to express yourself (to the extent that you haven’t given it up). However, there is no such thing as the right to an opinion. Instead, anyone who holds an opinion is duty-bound to justify it.

    As to Filipino consciousness, refer to my response at 1:32am.

    how do you gauge the trend on filipino consciousness as you say from the time the gomburza fathers died up to the present? is this something quantifiable or just a vague idea of yours? – Harry

    Harry, i think it has increased over the past one hundred thirty four years, seven months and twenty one days. If you want something quantifiable, you can count the number of Filipino passport holders . Without a doubt, they know what country they are form. As an OFW, i’ve filled enough forms where they ask me what my nationality is. Although of course that’s not the only measure.

    If silencing those who criticize and destabilize the government is what it takes to restore the pride and dignity of this nation then so be it. – Bibeth

    Then that means you’re going further than Karah in terms of willingness to take away other people’s rights. (Ibang usapan na iyan.) I wonder if Karah, Harry and Ramrod agrees?

    • karah on October 8, 2007 at 1:59 am

    Pete The problem is not the TAX RATE, it’s the Tax Collection and Tax Enforcement. I am for the repeal of the R-VAT (Reformed Value-Added Tax) since the burden of this tax is being felt by the “common tao” (the common taxpayer). The RICH and ELITE can always either EVADE or AVOID taxes thru all types of loopholes.

    How much Taxes are spilled due to Smuggling?
    How much Taxes are spilled due to the inability of the BIR to collect proper taxes from Large Taxpayers?
    How much Taxes are spilled on certain incentives being given, like some players in the Tobacco Industry?
    How much Taxes are spilled on certain loopholes in the Taxation that those who have the money to hire lawyers can exploit?

    Though the bulk of the Revenue Collection comes from the BIR and the BOC, another source would be GOCC’s and GFI’s. These institutions should be examined and what are their RATES of RETURN year-in-year-out and how much do they contribute to the National Treasury.

    There are actually a lot of Revenue-generating measures and endeavors that can be done but some people in Government want to cut corners and just pass a bill increasing the TAX and the poor good taxpayers feel the full brunt whilst those who evade and avoid are sitting pretty. Quite a sight.

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 2:01 am

    Bibeth,

    You’re going overboard with the “silencing those who criticize..” line. I think its one of your jokes, inaasar mo lang si cvj. 🙂

    • karah on October 8, 2007 at 2:02 am

    jvc The issue is not about “having or not having” a right to an opinion. My question is pretty simple. Do you know how to respect the opinions of others? It’s just a matter of answering in the AFFIRMATIVE or the NEGATIVE. Is that hard for you? Again, don’t skirt my question with your reasons. If you in the affirmative, fine. If you say in the negative, fine. The problem is, you haven’t answered it until now.

    • Harry on October 8, 2007 at 2:04 am

    “Harry, i think it has increased over the past one hundred thirty four years, seven months and twenty one days. If you want something quantifiable, you can count the number of Filipino passport holders . Without a doubt, they know what country they are form. As an OFW, i’ve filled enough forms where they ask me what my nationality is. Although of course that’s not the only measure.”

    in simple terms, you don’t know. i think your filipino consciousness idea does not stop in knowing that you’re a filipino. so how do you gauge this idea of yours (as you claim that theres an uptrend)?

    harry c

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 2:06 am

    cvj,

    Extraordinary problems need extraordinary solutions.

    Our country’s problem is by no means ordinary.

    Hard steps had to be taken, unpopular decisions needs to be made, and sacrifices are necessary.

    But jokes can’t be silenced, for as along as there is chaos, disunity and anarchy, jokes are the only hope we have, our light at the end of the tunnel.

    • pete on October 8, 2007 at 2:07 am

    ramrod,

    re deception somewhere,

    that’s how you feel about Trillanes becoming senator, I respect that, but i find it qite judgemental. Although I observe that FVR, Honasan, Trillanes, the Sundalos have acquired a messianinc complex. I think this is real and should recognized as a maladjustment in some elements in the military’s mind-set. an over extension of the defender of the people is saving the people — messianic complex. that mindset could be expressed in different ways including an advocacy by GMA generals for a declaration of martial law.

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 2:09 am

    Karah, if you understood my explanation above, you’d realize that you’re asking a question that cannot be answered by a yes or no since respecting other’s opinions is meaningless. I respect your right to express yourself (while you still have it).

    • karah on October 8, 2007 at 2:15 am

    cvj But still you did not answer my question. There’s no such thing as a “meaningless” question as you say. It’s just that you don’t wanna answer a question point-blank because it would put you on the spot and so you find ways and means to evade it. It’s my opinion. Don’t you worry, it’s my FREEDOM anyways, not yours.

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 2:15 am

    Bibeth, it’s good that you are revealing your position more and more. It’s one thing for you yourself to make a sacrifice but your willingness to sacrifice others’ freedoms is something else. Who gave you that right?

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 2:17 am

    It’s my opinion. – Karah

    I think your opinion is WRONG 😛

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 2:17 am

    cvj,

    as my pal once said.. no guts.. no GORY

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 2:20 am

    Yeah Bibeth, but with someone else’s guts? Who gave you that right?

    • karah on October 8, 2007 at 2:20 am

    cvj You position that my “opinion is wrong” is WRONG. 😛

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 2:20 am

    pete,

    I have to admit you’re right in your “messianic complex” angle. 20 years ago I believed we were needed to save the Filipino people and did everything in my power to do so. Such is the folly of youth, but in the military, a dangerous one. Why do you think I chose to join the business sector instead. So many were “disillusioned.” Personally, I saw my squad leader, the same one who mentored me about the honor code, found guilty of violating it, and he was not alone.
    Now its up to this younger generation, who are hopefully untainted by all this, will be more discerning. Of the list you mentioned, I’ll listen only to Honasan, though he is quiet at the moment, I hope he’s just busy doing his job and focusing on things that really matter.

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 2:22 am

    I feel so much sexual tension here.

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 2:24 am

    I smell a hot head in here?

    How about you karah?

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 2:25 am

    Ok, good night folks @[email protected]

    • Harry on October 8, 2007 at 2:25 am

    i smell chicharon being cooked.

    • ramrod on October 8, 2007 at 2:26 am

    Good night, good night, parting is such sweet sorrow…

    • cvj on October 8, 2007 at 2:27 am

    Must be Bibeth’s Boy Bawang.

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 2:28 am

    Karah is just starting to warm up.

    Better get some facts straightened up…

    • karah on October 8, 2007 at 2:28 am

    Beth I can smell the aroma of chicharon being cooked (from where I am) as far as Carcar, Cebu.

    • vic on October 8, 2007 at 2:29 am

    yeah I like these discussions about freedoms and rights.

    If some of us think we have freedoms, just because we can say anything without to answer for our words or responsible to the consequence of what was we “blabber” about, then we are NOT talking about the freedom of speech.

    If some of us think that freedoms and rights guarantee us the right to deprive others of theirs, like what the Military and Police are alleged to have done, then you can have that freedoms, I’d rather lose mine and make sure that the cops and military lose their right to deprive others the right to life.

    If you think freedoms and rights guarantee the elites and the aristocrats to have the immunities which the masses do not enjoy, then I’ll rather side with the masses to make sure that the elites and the aristocrats losses that freedoms too…and there are more…but to top it off I’ll copy and paste Section 1 of our Charter that state that rights and freedoms are guaranteed, subject to limits, followed by Section 15 the Equality Rights.

    Guarantee of Rights and Freedoms
    Section 1:
    The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the rights and freedoms set out in it subject only to such reasonable limits prescribed by law as can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.
    Equality Rights
    Section 15. (1) Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.
    (2) Subsection (1) does not preclude any law, program or activity that has as its object the amelioration of conditions of disadvantaged individuals or groups including those that are disadvantaged because of race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 2:30 am

    Karah loves chicharon.

    Better give some straightforward answers… or she’ll make a chicharon out of you.

    • pete on October 8, 2007 at 2:32 am

    karah,

    thanks, you’ve given a good context of why RVAT must be repealed. It is an additional burden on the common tao and more funds are lost thru corrutpion.

    GMA is able to stay in power because we, the people, are forced to give her the extra tax money she uses to bribe corrupt politicians and generals, to satisfy her creditors while starving the people, to get more loans even if the people bleed to death in paying them.

    The RVAT gives GMA extra tax money to bribe more, to borrow more to stay in power. The VAT must be returned to its pre-RVAT level and coverage. Remove VAT on oil and power. Return VAT from 12% to 10%.

    Reducing tax money has a disabling effect on GMA’s corrupt transactional style of leadership. Once GMA is fiscally disabled, it’s easier to persuade her to go on leave of absence.

    • bibeth on October 8, 2007 at 2:34 am

    Karah,

    you might want to take some nap. You have a flight tomorrow. We sure will miss you for about a week.

    Don’t forget my bear. I prefer the polar bear, very cuddly and playful.

    And extend my regards to daddy Bush.

    • Harry on October 8, 2007 at 2:38 am

    “If some of us think we have freedoms, just because we can say anything without to answer for our words or responsible to the consequence of what was we “blabber” about, then we are NOT talking about the freedom of speech.” -vic

    i agree. even freedoms and rights are not absolute. they have limits. when a person uses his freedom to infringe the freedom of other people. it’s not freedom, it’s abuse.

    harry c

    • schizophonic on October 8, 2007 at 2:42 am

    Karah, are you also Lailow?

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