«

»

Jul 05

Military pickle

Armed Forces pickle: to prosecute, or not to prosecute, that is the question. Since ABS-CBN broadcast a videotape of Gen. Danilo Lim, the armed forces have been in a quandary. It’s clear Lim intended to withdraw support and trigger a seismic political event. So now, the military, which was going easy on him, has less reason to do so, now. Civilian officials, perhaps chafing at having to tolerate a divided government (civilian sphere for civilians, but little civiian oversight on the military, which saved its neck), are crowing that the military has to throw the book at Lim. the military doesn’t seem enthused over the prospects of having to do so. They deny they have a report indicting rebel officers: were such a report really written, it would leave no wiggle room, legally. So now military and civilian officials are going to be at odds.

The Inquirer editorial argues that it’s important to ask why media got the tape first, and why the armed forces have been less than eager to fully prosecute Gen. Lim -and by extension, can the armed forces vigorously prosecute Lim at all, even with such apparently iron-clad evidence, such as the tape?

Gen. Lim, after all, might be charged with plotting a coup, but doing so raises the question of what motivated him -and puts him up for comparison with officers he’s criticized, such as the generals accused of helping to manipulate election results. There’s no win-win for the armed forces here.

Even the scuttlebutt is interesting: an additional benefit of Philippine Army troops swarming Bulacan province, is that they not only liquidate rebels, but serve as a buffer should the Scout Rangers make a gambit for the capital.

In the Comelec, one news report suggests one Commissioner’s been put on the spot, to warn others of the dangers of being too professional. Ellen Tordesillas reminds us that it’s all par for the course in covering up the original sin.

The administration decides it can’t risk a two-front war; so it’s hopes of peace with Muslim rebels (under the scrutiny of oil- and dollar-rich Arab countries) and an it’s hopes of peace with Muslim rebels.

Joe Klein, recently in Newsweek, summarizes the current flavor of the month in counterinsurgency theory: called COIN, it works this way:

You flood a neighborhood with troops who walk the streets 24/7, who create a presence that deters mayhem, who eventually begin to build trust relationships with the locals and who, finally, make it possible to provide basic services like water, sanitation, education and electricity. According to Lieut. Colonel John Nagl, author of a recent book on counterinsurgency warfare called Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife : Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam” (John A. Nagl), “The tipping point comes when the residents trust you enough to tell you where the bad guys are rather than telling the bad guys where you are.” coin, then, requires two things that armies are traditionally not very good at: sophisticated person-to-person skills and patience. It also requires a very specific sort of training.

Then again, that theory was practiced in the 1950s and only suggests the commensensical. As a Thai commentary, concerning its own insurgency problem puts it, Force alone won’t win battle with insurgents.

The Palace backpedals its aggression aimed at Catholic bishops.

One Voice convenors meet with the Manila Times editors.

World Bank tells the government: now the bleeding’s stopped, get rid of the tapeworms.

The joys of parliamentary government can be seen in Thailand and Malaysia, where Prime Minister Thaksin has set out on a comeback, and where former PM Mahathir is fighting an insurgency within his own party over basically patronage-related issues. Recent commentary in The Nation of Thailand (which has been consistently critical of Thaksin) sounds eerily like Joseph Estrada trying to make a comeback: PM’s motivations hold key to his conspiracy theory and PM’s latest salvo threatens division. Another view on Thai politics is in The New Straits Times.

In the punditocracy, my Arab News column for this week is Obscurantism Leaves Unrecognized Those Filipinos Who Peacefully Sought Independence.

Dan Mariano discusses the military razing of a radio station.

Johnna Villaviray-Giolagon takes a cue from the book “The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power” (Max Boot) and discusses the nature of tribal conflict in Mindanao.Gail Ilagan takes an altogether different look at Mindanao: she appeals for donations to a children’ s reading corner.

Greg Macabenta begins a series dissecting Charter change.

Bong Austero has little patience for government censors, and offers up constructive criticism for ABS-CBN’s Bandila program.

In the blogosphere, Iloilo City Boy asks, is Jamby Madrigal the new Loren Legarda?

COMELEC ako takes a look at the charges leveled against Commissioner Borra.

Istambay sa Mindanao reflects on warfare’s costs.

mongster’s nest dissects what he says are three difficulties involved with being a National Democrat.

Peryodistang Pinay on development debates in Cebu City.

Wish you were here is alarmed over missile tests by North Korea.

Technorati Tags: , , ,

96 comments

2 pings

Skip to comment form

  1. anna de brux

    Re: “Leaving the tape aside, Lim and his camp solicited support from high and low for the active and unconstitutional removal of a sitting President. Lim does not enjoy the privileges of a private citizen – subject as he is to military law, Lim does not have the right to ask others to withdraw support.”

    Wrong Mickeytymoc!

    If you are speaking of moral rights (which is part and parcel of military traditions and law), Lim has all the rights in the world even when he wears a military uniform to ask other members of the military to withdraw support.

    If you really want to stick to the letters of the book, I must tell you that there is nothing in the military book that says he has no moral right to do so.

    However, if for the sake of argument Lim took that right and used it to do what his conscience dictated him to do, by military traditions and military law, he would stand guilty of mounting a mutiny with a view to open armed rebellion should he fail to execute his plans; in such a case he would have to face a court martial and if found guilty, he would risk the firing squad.

    But to say that he didn’t have the right to call for withdrawal of support against a government that he did not believe to be a legitimate government is not quite right.

    You might want to look up cases involving senior and junior military officers of the US Confederate Army during the US Civil War and in a later version, British military conscripts during WW2.

  2. anna de brux

    I’m not enamoured of Jamby Madrigal but must take Manuel B’s line that JDV and a host of other legislators have been doing the same – backchanneling with Utrecht without the official consent of the legislature so I don’t see any problem there.

    Loren did that several times without officially being designated by Congress and she was never censured.

    Without that particular incident in mind, Carl is right in a way – I do find that Madrigal could be an airhead.

  3. Jon Mariano

    Jamby is just trying too hard to get accepted as senator. What stuck on my mind is her use of high fallutin and highly technical words during interpellation in the senate!

    I don’t know what the real reason behind “sleeping with the enemy” (according to Malacanang), but it appears as if she’s looking for more publicity. Poor girl, she should just have remained out of politics! On the lighter side, at least she’s now learned not to engage Enrile in a spitting contest!

  4. cvj

    I think Jeg’s points are unassailable. I voted for Loren, but Noli represents the will of the people. We have the right to *insist* that GMA step down, but we can only *request* Noli to do the same (to give way to Villar and/or snap elections). Otherwise, he remains the designated successor, everyone has to respect that, especially now that the Filipino middle has a historic debt that it needs to repay.

  5. anna de brux

    Juan,

    Your analysis makes absolute sense. But if there is ever truth that ABS-CBN is in on this thing by way of barter, it will definitely leave a bitter taste in the mouth.

    At the end of the day, it is the oligarchy that rules!

  6. anna de brux

    Cvj, I concur.

  7. juan makabayan

    mb, cvj, jeg, schumey, thanks, very good points,

    “From acting to full-pledged, transition to assume-term-tenure, a President de Castro scenario opens opportunities to resolve the impasse … in the absence of an alternative, the preferred (constitutional) option.”

    mb, President Noli and VP Manny is not a bad combination, a win-win combination worth the swing factors’ bets. The Loren factor is workable(cabinet post), Noli legitmacy question is not as insurmoutable as Gloria’s,

    cvj, very good line, further along: A ‘winning formula’ that can galavanize massive multi-sectoral popular support to ‘request’, pressure VP Noli to be open to a post-GMA scenario. “We have the right to *insist*” is desperate for a way and an objective — an acceptable post-GMA situation. Consensus on criteria fascilitates consensus on formula.

  8. Carl

    “Carl, what does it make JDV?” — manuel, does anyone care about JDV? Everyone knows what he is. But the airhead senator has intellectual pretensions. At least JDV didn’t attempt form an alliance with the Reds to try to bring down government.

    anna de brux said: “But if there is ever truth that ABS-CBN is in on this thing by way of barter, it will definitely leave a bitter taste in the mouth.

    — This is what the Inquirer quoted Señeres regarding the Lim tape and the respective roles ABC-5 and ABS-CBN had in the tape:

    “Señeres told the Inquirer that the video was pre-taped by the ABC-5 staff with Cojuangco’s knowledge. When the plot failed, Cojuangco was literally left holding the tape, he said.

    “I know for a fact (Cojuangco) tried to suppress the tape. He thought it won’t come out anymore so we were all surprised it came out. But maybe a technician got a copy and sold it to ABS-CBN,” Señeres said.”

    — An ABC-5 technician sold the Lim tape to ABS-CBN? Shades of Doble and the Garci tapes! It’s amazing how anything can be had in this country – for the right price, of course. And, naturally ABS-CBN went all over town with it and now Tonyboy Cojuangco is left stewing, trying to explain his implication in all this cloak and dagger stuff.

  9. mlq3

    carl, that is to assume that seneres is telling the truth 100%, or that everyone else is lying 100%, or that we now know everything, or to even be surprised that in any country, anywhere, things aren’t for sale.

  10. The Ca t

    Perhaps Mbuencamino and ana should read wikipedia and read the evolvement of the usage of the word coup d ‘etat lately especially in the Philippines.

    What’s the difference between Enrile’s and Danilo Lim’s withdrawal of support from their Commander-in-chiefs? Enrile was supported by Fidel Ramos and the people while Lim was left alone by those people who must have convinced him that they will support him all the way.

    And the big difference is that the former succeeded and the last attempt failed because the OPLAN HACKLE alone connotes HAMMER AND SICKLE which is the communist’s logo. What people in their right mind would support such as an attempt to overthrow a democratic government where even bloggers can call the President names without being censored.

  11. cvj

    The Ca T, when you referred to overthrowing a ‘democratic’ government, i assume that you are using the term loosely or perhaps out of habit?

  12. Carl

    mlq said: “carl, that is to assume that seneres is telling the truth 100%, or that everyone else is lying 100%, or that we now know everything, or to even be surprised that in any country, anywhere, things aren’t for sale.”

    — Of course, it’s Señeres’ word against the slithering oligarchs. Who is more credible? There is a tremendously deep history of deceit and treachery within our oligarchy. Ask the Katipuneros. Ask the guerillas who fought against the Japanese collaborators.

    As for things being for sale, it’s a matter of price. P2 million for the Garci tapes? They go at bargain basement prices here. What would you say the ABC-5 tapes sold for?

    The Cat said: “What’s the difference between Enrile’s and Danilo Lim’s withdrawal of support from their Commander-in-chiefs? Enrile was supported by Fidel Ramos and the people while Lim was left alone by those people who must have convinced him that they will support him all the way.

    And the big difference is that the former succeeded and the last attempt failed because the OPLAN HACKLE alone connotes HAMMER AND SICKLE which is the communist’s logo. What people in their right mind would support such as an attempt to overthrow a democratic government where even bloggers can call the President names without being censored.”

    — Very perceptive. As Raymond Domenech (the coach of the French football team) said, in the end, victory is the final arbiter.

    And a very loud YES! No matter what, this is still a very democratic government compared to what they have in North Korea or Cuba. Or the Cambodian government of Pol Pot and the Vietnamese government of the ’70’s, which only brought death and misery to so many of their people. Wisely, these governments have now renounced these Communist regimes which only brought untold misery to millions.

  13. Schumey

    I think Seneres has a deeper role in this latest soap. I watched the tape and Lim seems to be inviting selfless Filipinos to step up and lead a council. He might have personalities in mind or a list which Seneres is privy to. Could it be that Seneres felt the noose tightening that he casually floated the names to avoid getting all the heat. The next few days will be very “colorful” as accusations will be hurled by both sides. This we should follow carefully and maybe something cooking from both sides will come out.

  14. juan makabayan

    Moving forward guys! from speculation to deliberation:

    We got the ingredients for a great recipe!!
    jeg & cvj: it must be constitutional (“It’s the constitution, stupid!” side of the debate)
    mb: it must be transitional (“snap”); and a coalition? (open working relationships)
    schumey & anna: it must be progressive ( “will benefit the people”, “not the oligarchs”)

    consensus criteria: constitutional, coalition, transition government with a progressive agenda.

    formula: a)composition: Pres de Castro, VP Villar or Drilon or Pimentel, Coalition cabinet – admin(Noli guys), opposition, progressive. b) agenda: 1st phase: emergency economic measures, political & electoral reforms; 2nd phase: 2007 elections, con-con delegate elections, constitutional convention; 3rd Phase: 2010 or earlier: elections cum referendum;
    Great recipe! Let’s cook, set and have a ‘fiesta revolution’ for a change!

  15. anna de brux

    Juan,

    Remember the old adage though: too many cooks spoil the broth!

  16. anna de brux

    Cat,

    I am with you on the coup d’état by Enrile & FVR but you failed to mention the Angie Reyes’ (who mutinied) backed Gloria Macapagal coup d’état. No matter how one interprets coup d’état, the mechanics must be there for the act to be called a coup d’état.

    In the same manner that Enrile and FVR along with Gringo, anybody in the world who is remotely knoweldgeable in the mechanics of toppling a government by force would say that Enrile and his friends launched a coup d’état. All the elements were there as well as the mechanics for a coup d’état.

    Their saving grace was Reagan because had Reagan not asked Marcos to come clean, those guys would have been in prison for life or executed. FVR being a senior military commander would have faced the wall to be shot.

    Lim’s case is different! He did not take up arms nor move his troops to be declared at this point of a coup d’état ATTEMPT, least of all a coup d’état – that’s why I said that at worst, he may be guilty of being part of a conspiracy to MOUNT a coup d’état but I maintain that technically, he did not ATTEMPT a coup d’état because of the missing elements and the absence of the mechanics.

    That he may have “INVITED” part of the population to “withdraw support” which, in military doctrines is not a formally enunciated in writing and therefore not considered a legal impediment (it is usually an implicit act by subordinates against their sergeants or young lieutenants in the heat of a battle which may be construed as “withdrawal of support” and punishable in the Articles of War for disobedience, dereliction of duty, etc). Depending on the exact language of Lim, he may either be charged under several articles in the Articles of War but without doubt, he may be indicted pronto for MUTINY.

    There lies the difference between your two cases!

    I do hope you understand the subtle difference now.

  17. anna de brux

    Ooops, “Lim’s (a senior military officer) case is different! He did not take up arms nor move his troops to be declared at this point GUILTY of a coup d’état ATTEMPT…”

  18. Phil Cruz

    Yes, it’s really very tempting to conclude that ABS_CBN is in some sort of a deal here with the administration in exposing the Lim video. But you know what stops me from completely succumbing to this theory? Maria Ressa. Yes. Maria Ressa. She’s the head of News and Public Affairs. Deep inside I trust the lady.

    Is she in on it, too? I really don’t think so. Is it possible she doesn’t know what’s going on? She’s quite hands on. And she’s not dumb or willing to play dumb. Has she been directed by higher management to play ball? I think she’s one who would rather resign than play footsie-ball on this one. In fact, she’s been moving heaven and earth to improve the news department’s professionalism.

    And she’s aided by Charie Villa and Luchi Cruz, two very credible news professionals. Plus Ricky Carandang.

    Well, time will tell. The truth will surface ultimately. But until then, I’d have to say I’m witholding judment on this.

    Maria, don’t let us down. All we ask from a news organization is objectivity, neutrality, accuracy and fairness.

  19. anna de brux

    There was a time when Maria Ressa was villified in the Philippine press – whe she was CNN person in Indonesia.

    I see that has changed dramatically.

  20. anna de brux

    Carl,

    As far as I am concerned, I don’t want – in any manner whatsoever, to compare the Philippines to North Korea or to Myanmar.

    What I do want is for people in government or even in Gloria’s illegitimate govt to abide by the rules of democracy and apply the rule of law.

  21. antonio walanglaban

    bwahahahahahahaha! anna, rule of law naman ngayon ang gusto mo! pag kontra kay gloria, kailangan galangin ang rule of law; pag sa tingin mo kampi kay gloria, ginagawa mong katatawanan ang konsepto ng rule of law. HAHAHAHA!

  22. juan makabayan

    anna, a good leader or tandem can gain support from the team.

  23. anna de brux

    Antonio Walang…..,

    What makes you say that?

    You are assuming that Gloria is the legitmate president. But to me and to millions of people, she is not the legitimate president. That she may cow people (including you) to believe that she is, is neither here nor there. The fact of the matter is that Gloria broke the rule of law.

    So, what’s your problem?

    Until she subjects herself to the rule of law, any other argument you present for or on behalf of Gloria is totally invalid as far as I am concerned.

    And there’s NOTHING you say or do that can change that FULL STOP!

    Oh and don’t try that trick on me about turninq and twisting facts coz when I see bullshit, I bury it… End of story!

    BWAHHAHAHAHAH TO YOU TOO!

  24. cvj

    Carl, what we have are democratic institutions (vintage 1987) which are currently infected by distinctly undemocratic types. The dilemma is getting rid of these parasites without killing the host. I wouldn’t be too preocuppied with turning into a Cambodia, North Korea or Cuba. This Century’s demons are still bringing death and misery but have assumed a different form.

    juanmakabayan, a de Castro Presidency leading to elections and a constitutional convention (if we really must) is as good as i can hope for. Let the emerging majority set the agenda, choose the leaders and let us in our capacity as members of the middle step back and concentrate on assuring minority rights as we would most likely be part of it. The only things i can think of to add to your list is (1)Justice for the murdered journalist and leftists and (2) releasing Faeldon and others like him to help in the spring cleaning within the military done, of course, by its own members.

    In our personal capacities, we can choose to participate in larger political and economic advocacies but i suspect at some point our beliefs would lead us to part ways in good faith. As part of the middle forces, we have some ideological housecleaning to do given the events of the past decade as this is the closest we have come to SocDem Bolshevism.

  25. The Ca t

    Ana said:

    “I am with you on the coup d’état by Enrile & FVR but you failed to mention the Angie Reyes’ (who mutinied) backed Gloria Macapagal coup d’état. No matter how one interprets coup d’état, the mechanics must be there for the act to be called a coup d’état.”

    That’s exactly why I want you to see the modern definition of coup d’etat. It does not have to have the element of violence nor the grabbing of power from the administration. It is enough that they threaten the government of disobedience and serve as arbiter for a peaceful transition.

    I do not categorize Angelo Reyes a mutiny or a coup. It is more od conspiracy with the civil society and other political factions that saw their interests in Estrada’s government at risk because of the increasing unpopularity of the Erap and his not so discrere handling of families’ scandals of corruptions and immorality. Who wanted to go down in a sinking ship. Kuha muna silang salbabida and adopt a wait and see attitude.

    As for CVJ comment on democratic government, I recommend you read the articles about the worst dictators of the world. Even in the US of A there are rights which are curtailed in the name of the
    country’s security. The GMA regime does not parallel that of Marcos where even after the martial law was lifted, only one newspaper was bold to openly criticize the regime. Dissenting opinions were passed on thru the XEROX brigade. During the timeof Erap when the ex-President himself castigated Inquirer, us, Filipinos here in the US rallied using our e-mails and our voices in the forums condemning such act.

  26. antonio walanglaban

    BWAHAHAHAHA! You self-righteous darling. I couldn’t care less about changing your mind. I just find you hilarious.

  27. cvj

    Ca T, comparing our current situation with Marcos-era political rights is setting the bar a bit low. The relevant comparison would be with previous years under the 5th Republic, and by that yardstick we don’t do well. Fake president, killings of journalists and leftists, tinkering with the Constitution, ‘all-out war’ – all point to a deterioration of past democratic gains. As for the bloggers, they are still relatively obscure and are most likely too well connected to be touched, for the moment. Once the supply of leftists and pesky journalists run-out, who knows?

  28. anna de brux

    Cat,

    For heaven’s sake! If you have convinced yourself of a different story with regard to the Angie Reyes mutiny which helped Gloria launch her coup d’état, how could a new definition even by Philippine standard change anything.

    Goodnesse gracious me! If you think the Philippines should re-define coup d’état, it is closer to being a banana republic than one might suspect, particularly by US standard.

    The military definition of coup d’état is modern enough as it is and doesn’t warrant a different definition even to suit Philipine desideratas.

    Perhaps when professional military officers of world repute, i.e., SACEUR Commanding General, UK Chief of Defence Forces, Chief Joint Staffs US and their advocate generals, agree to a different definition for the Philippines, then fine. Until then, let’s stick to what coup d’état reall is, shall we?

    So, I propose that we leave it at that…

  29. anna de brux

    Oh but I do agree with you on one point Cat…a coup d’état need not be bloody or violent. The mere act of TOPPLING a legitimate government by force (whether by violently or not) is a coup d’état.

    Just out of curiosity, you may want to read one of the most recent cases of attempted coup d’état in the west was the one that almost toppled the UK Labour government of Harold Wilson. It had all the ingredients of a coup d’état attempt which was organized and initiated by the upper class under Lord Mountbatten with the complicity of many members of the British Armed Forces, MI5 and MI6. (The organizers had counted on a few deaths but wanted to limit the whole enterprise to a non-bloody coup d’état as much as possible.)

    When they dilly-dallied, they were discovered so, they backed out but it was rightly labeled conspiracy to commit and attempted coup d’état – it had all the ingredients and the mechanics for the toppling a duly constituted, legitimate government. No charges were filed against the organizers because Wilson felt that he didn’t want to shake the status quo.

  30. anna de brux

    Cat, what is really funny is that even with your own version of coup d’éta a la Philippines, it still cannot reverse tje fact that Gloria Macapagal’s committed a coup d’état.

    Anyway, civil disobedience alone DOES NOT constitute a coup d’état. It IS civil disobedience and not a coup d’état!

  31. anna de brux

    Also, Cat do you realize that Angie Reyes, the highest ranking officer then, out of cowardice (which you yourself practically labeled in your salbabida analogy) for not defending his commander in chief and the seat of government from the coup d’étatists Gloria et al should have been shot under the Articles of War?

    General Lee had approved the execution of a few good officers in his army for lesser military crimes.

  32. juan makabayan

    anna, a sedition case was filed against GMA in QC court, (not so sure) by atty lozano and/or lumbao of pmap, dismissed

  33. The Ca t

    Ana wrote:
    “Also, Cat do you realize that Angie Reyes, the highest ranking officer then, out of cowardice (which you yourself practically labeled in your salbabida analogy) for not defending his commander in chief and the seat of government from the coup d’étatists Gloria et al should have been shot under the Articles of War?”

    I do. But so are Gringo, Danilo Lim and the other ranking military officers who led the coupS (S emphasized)under Cory Aquino.

  34. The Ca t

    cvj wrote:
    “Ca T, comparing our current situation with Marcos-era political rights is setting the bar a bit low.”

    My comparison was only in response to the parallelism drawn by some commenters here.

    And your question about democratic government whereby, I mentioned about US curtailment of some rights for the sake of the nation’s security.

  35. anna de brux

    Cat,

    I agree with you on that score. Gringo should have been shot instead of being elected to the Senate. Amazing really.

    Marcos was very lenient too with Vic Corpuz and so was Ramos when he was Cory’s CSAFP. And so was Gloria when she promoted him and gave him very powerful staff position as Chief ISAFP.

    Vic Corpuz should have been shot illico but obviously, he surrendered so naawa sila sa kanya.

  36. cvj

    Ca t, i see. Thanks for the clarification. IMHO, the US under Bush is no longer the role model for democratic rights, but that’s a separate topic.

  37. The Ca t

    Ana wrote:
    “For heaven’s sake! If you have convinced yourself of a different story with regard to the Angie Reyes mutiny which helped Gloria launch her coup d’état, how could a new definition even by Philippine standard change anything.”

    First, I did not do the redifinition. It was wikipedia. In the same manner that people power in the Philippines gave a different meaning to a revolt by the people (bloodless) so is the perception for the “coups” that are happening in the country. BECAUSE ACTUALLY IT IS NOT STAGED BY THE MILITARY but the power behind the military.

    What different story did I get regarding Reyes mutiny? Did I not witness the impeachment proceedings of Estrada. I printed the inquirer’s day-to-day account and I have to subscribe for TFC just to witness the live telecast. Didn’t I see what happened during the walk-out?

    Did n’t I read the newspapers about the bragging and the whining of some members of the civil society who admitted that it was all their machinations that brought GMA to power because she was the next in rank? Did I not see Orly Mercado, the Secretary of Defense as well as the other Cabinet members who likewise jumped ship when it was sinking fast.

    While some say that politics has no soul, I say it has several and it continues to reincarnate in the same evil form.

    Goodnesse gracious me! If you think the Philippines should re-define coup d’état, it is closer to being a banana republic than one might suspect, particularly by US standard.

  38. The Ca t

    Ana wrote:
    “When they dilly-dallied, they were discovered so, they backed out but it was rightly labeled conspiracy to commit and attempted coup d’état – it had all the ingredients and the mechanics for the toppling a duly constituted, legitimate government. No charges were filed against the organizers because Wilson felt that he didn’t want to shake the status quo.”

    I agree with them, it was more of a conspiracy and not a coup since there were other powerful groups who were involved and it was a covert and deceptive plan, unlike the coups carried out by Gringo et al.

    If JAmby together with the Left oust the president, I would consider that a revolution since we will be expecting a change in the political system. Come on people, do you think Sison would allow democracy to live on. hah

  39. anna de brux

    Cat,

    Wikepeda does not write the Articles of War for the military nor do military officers subscribe to the definitions of wikepeda to implement their own rules, regulations and laws.

    Angie Reyes and his major service commanders committed mutiny under the Articles of War – full stop. There is NO professional or bona-fide military institution nor any military academy in the world today that will disagree with what I advanced, whatever the political context.

    There is no going around about it. I place them in a military context and not in civilian context because they were supposed to be military officers, the reason perhaps why we don’t agree.

    The military has its own set of rules and its own laws (naturally, their laws are subservient to the Constitution of a Republic) and in the context of their commission of their military crime at that time and while Angie Reyes and his commanders were wearing their uniform, I would and will always see their actions then in terms of military justice.

    This is one time and one area when you can apply the adage: black or white. (Although I grant you that military traditions dating from as far back as King George IIIrd’s colonial and army forces and not even Napoleon’s army and up to today, have not always applied the adage or seen things in black and white, and rightly so.)

  40. anna de brux

    Cat,

    More on military trivia:

    During the Algerian war of independence, a few French generals who were against granting Algeria their independence and staged a mutiny.

    They had the backing of many of the rich “pieds noir” (French who were born and grew up in Algeria). Their cause was almost noble – they felt that French pied noirs were being shortchanged in the process, etc. (Btw, the pied noirs exodus was one of the largest human exodus in modern history). They also felt that the pied noirs who wanted to stay behind needed protection and therefore the military should stay put. But the military order was to pack up and leave – troops were consigned to their barracks while awaiting pullout. Because of that order, thousands of pied noirs were left without protectiion in their homes and were promptly massacred by FLN (Algerian FLN).

    The French generals who committed mutiny – defying de Gaulle’s orders no matter the nobility of their purpose, were arrested, tried and a few of them shot. End of story.

    In the same vein, the UK has outlawed hanging, capital punishment but the UK Armed Forces still carry in its Articles of War, the death penalty for mutineers.

    Until today, all of HMS ships post HMS Navy Articles of War in its wardrooms which state that muntiny is punishable by death.

    There’s no way you can go around it. You may ask the UK Defence Forces Chief of Staff what Angie Reyes and his major service commanders committed when they “withdrew support” from a legally constitutionally mandated president of the republic and without batting an eyelash, he would say: MUTINY.

    You can also ask General Colin Powell and it will be the same verdict.

    That Angie Reyes won and is free today is neither here nor there and even if you surround his act with civilian pomp and pageantry – the military verdict will be unanimous. He led and committed a mutiny. In military law, he and the others should be shot.

  41. anna de brux

    Cat,

    You need not go to international military circles to define the military crime committed by Angie and his commanders. Simply ask his classmates from PMA Class 66 who were already retired when Reyes led his mutiny. They will give the same verdict: MUTINY.

  42. anna de brux

    Some more trivia Cat,

    Very, very true story…

    In 2002, Angie Reyes was invited by the UK to seal the deal UK Kinetic company deal with RP. Because he was RP’s Minister of Defence who was there on defence business, due military protocol was accorded him. However, to give you an idea of his reputation, one Green Jacket commander (UK Army) who was present when he visited Plymouth asked me later on “Wasn’t he the Chief of the Army (military position & rank which I corrected naturally) who led the Armed Forces mutiny?

  43. The Ca t

    What’s your beef with Angelo Reyes? There are other “traitors” in their midst ?

    Slow down a bit. Too much obsession with the person clouds your sound judgement.

  44. juan makabayan

    On Accountability (of Gen Angelo Reyes)
    Cardinal Jaime Sin Symbolic Head of the Catholic Church, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Hilarion Davide, Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces Angelo Reyes, as heads of institutions that are vital for the well-being of 80M Filipinos were entrusted and vested with powers that can build or destroy a nation. With POWER comes RESPONSIBILITY and ACCOUNTABILITY —

    for Breach of Faith, breach of Trust, breach of Loyalty, breach of Pledge, breach of Vow, breach of Duty, breach of the Constitution …

  45. anna de brux

    Cat, do be quiet… it’s your judgement that’s been clouded from the start.

  46. leosalvo

    Angie was invetigated by the Senate. What happened?

  47. divina grace

    i need the mean source of between pres. FIDEL V. RAMOS and pres. AQUINO….

Fetch more comments

  1. stepping on poop. » Ain’t just a river in Egypt.

    […] If a tape of a rebellious general declaring his withdrawal of support won’t convince you that there was indeed a threat that justified the state of emergency, what will? Querubin, Lim, and Tonyboy Cojuangco doing the cancan and singing “You know we’re gonna mount a cooooooup d’etat” to the tune of “YMCA”? Odds are you don’t want to be convinced – you’re going to believe that Gloria is an illegitimate President, anyway, and apply two different standards of proof to (a) the evidence of Gloria’s election fraud and (b) the evidence of a coup! […]

Leave a Reply