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Dec 30

Readers respond, 2005

Today is Rizal Day, anniversary of the martyrdom of our national hero.

The Inquirer editorial considers Rizal Day events and says they are a Desecration.

Rizal-related matters from Ambeth Ocampo, from Chris Antonette P. Pugay, from Augusto V. De Viana, and Margarita Ventenilla-Hamada, columnist Ellen Tordesillas.

While Four-eyed Journal echoed my thoughts Rizal would dominate today, at least in the blogosphere, that’s not the case. The entries that go beyond the incidental are few: infocast :) makes a quiet wish; Senor Enrique is quite focused; Indios Bravos reproduces a brisk debate on everything from the Rizal law to the American role, or non-role, in proclaiming Rizal’s heroism. The Unlawyer has a good collection of links. Madame Chiang observes things with fresh eyes.

And here is the most popular Rizal-related thing I’ve ever written: Adolf Rizal (And His Half-brother, Rizal Zedong). On a more serious note, my Calamba, Laguna Rizal (Birth) Day lecture, Si Rizal at ang Pilosopiya ng Pagtitiis.

Mail bag: Besides the comments made on various entries, or messages people leave in my Guestbook or in places like My CV, I get letters (snail mail or fax) from readers, and emails. I’m terrible at collecting my snail mail, but I’m marginally better at receiving (and keeping) e-mail. Here’s as much from my readers as I’ve been able to save this year.

January

Sirs, Having just read Manual Quezon III’s hate rant against White Americans (“More On Racism”) I have printed the aritle and am distributing it to friends here in Virginia, including a U. S. Congressman friend, and several area teachers. The sort of racist bigotry that Mr. Quezon openly spews has become unacceptable in America, and rightly so, but unfortunately it is still acceptable in the Philippines, even in popular newspapers. I have been clipping racist and bigoted articles from the Philippine media and distributing them for a short while, hoping to awaken Americans to this rampant bigotry in the Philippines, that so few Americans seem to know exists, because they don’t visit here. The Philippine Daily Inquirer is certainly not the most offensive Philippine organ in this regard, and far from it. But that you feel no hesitation in publishing such a filthy piece of racist garbage as Mr. Quezon’s, is instructing. You need to do some self-examination.
Sincerly Yours
Timothy A. Page
Virginia Beach, Virginia USA

Just wanted to let you know that I\’m hoping that your columns regarding racism will prove to be useful to many Filipinos, many of whom love so many things American and will try everything just to become American and white. On some level, we\’re some eighty million Michael Jacksons who want to be white. No need to mention this in your column, of course, which is not to presume that this is worth mentioning at all. :)

Keep up the good work and let\’s hope many will read your columns.
Robert JA Basilio Jr.
Quezon City

Dear Manolo,

Your article on Racism was interesting as you had added informayion to what I di hear some
years back. The Filipino also used to have his slur on negitos, Chinese, Indians, as well as mestisos. Your Grandfather
the President and Sergio OsmeNa were slurred on various occasions for being mestiso Spanish and mestiso Chinese.
There was a time when our kababayns did consider the negritos/Aetas, Monobos, Igorots, Mangyans,Muslims as
Filipinos. We can say this is a thing of the past, however there are still some kababayans that still slur their fellow
men ffor the color of their skin.
Best wishes,
Jaime Calero
Sydney,Australia

I have to disagree with you. Many Filipinos are not detached to the sea. Probably the city slickers are but as a marine scientist, I know that fisherfolk are much concerned by conserving the seas as you and I are.

What drives them to destructive fishing practices is poverty. They know that education may give their kids a chance to escape but who can get a good education now? Probably only the rich can.

But there is good news. Our coastal people have started to conserve their own resources.
Ben Vallejo Jr.

In your recent article on the late Bill Shaw, you wrote that Mr. Shaw had a mestizo son by his Filipina wife. Bill Shaw had a adopted Filipino son named Joe Shaw. Joe, though good looking, was no mestizo. His features are as Pinoy as balut. Joe was a good friend as we would see each other and play golf together every Sunday in Wack-Wack in the pre-war years. Unfortunately, Joe squandered his inheritance and died an alcoholic and a very poor man.
Carlos Esteban, Jr.
AYALA  ALABANG

In your column of January 10, 2005, in the Philippine Star, titled \”Zoo Stories\” you wrote that the site of the present Manila Zoo represented \”the last surviving patch of a much bigger pre-war public park.\” This is not correct. The site of the present Manila Zoo was the pre-war city dumps of the City of Manila, the pre-war equivalent of \”Smokey Mountain\” or \”Payatas.\” Goes to show how small Manila was before the war. The street that bounded the northern part of the present Zoo, now named Quirino Ave., used to be named \”Cortabitarte.\” Some of the animals at the Jardin Botanico did not starve. Many escaped their cages. At one time, the acacia trees of Isaac Peral (now U. N. Ave.,) was full of monkeys that escaped from the old Manila Zoo. I know all this from personal knowledge as I lived before and during the war in Isaac Peral Street. Going to La Salle every morning, we would pass Cortabitarte and the City Dumps, now the site of present Manila Zoo.
James Litton
Quezon City

glad to know that you are nonong\’s offspring – we didn\’t know. your dad and i shared the same mentor in the person of Rev. Fr. Angel de Blas, OP, when he was Rector of UST and Letran and your dad was still in his \”sotana\”. we lost contact when i left for europe in the 50\’s to do my postgradate in madrid, heidelberg, paris, rome, hague, oxford, then across the atlantic to do further studies in taxation, ending up as an international tax lawyer in new york. i kept wondering who you are with a pronounced name of MLQ the \”turd\”. Never thought Nonong married and had children. sorry to hear of his passing – too bad we didn\’t get to reacquaint ourselves when you guys were travelling all over. we were always in new york since 1959, right in the center of town. if and when you come and visit, do give us a call , all private lines. there may be one project i may be interested for you to do by reconstructing the intramuros like they did in cartagena, colombia, thru public subscription from all ofw\’s – including my own  contribution, if handled properly free of corruption and crooked contractors.
pompeyo roa realuyo
park avenue, new york, ny 10021

Former president Manuel Roxas was never the leader of the \’entire\’ Philippine guerrilla movement during the Japanese occupation.  I was there.
Ty Rador

My apologies to your editorial yesterday (16th) about President Manuel Roxas being the leader of the entire  guerrilla activities in the Philippines during the war.  My eyeballs must have been scheming your yesterday\’s article faster that my brains could absorb ! I looked for the article again in the archive but could not find it. Again, my apologies.

Anyway, I have another question, today,you stated that JP Laurel Senior, disapproved of conscripting Filipinos.  Who then ordered the conscription of the Philippines constabulary at that time? These Constabularies were recruited from  Bataan veterans and some new civilian recruites. Their first contingent were training on the other half of Gomez Elementary School located at Quezon Boulevard/ Andalucia St, just across the street from the former house of Andres Narvasa (reired Chief justice of the Supreme Court, 1998).

Like I said, \” I was there. \” If responding to your feedback required more background information, I would have gladly provided them.
However, your article today on \”Divided Loyalties\” is one of your best yet.
Ty Rador

Have you ever wondered why the adjective \’Nazi\’ is almost always used when describing Germany\’s acts during WWII, but no such similar qualifier is used when describing Italy\’s or Japan\’s actions during this period?

It\’s the Nazis, not Germans, who waged WWII.Can we then say that is the neocons who waged the war in Iraq and not the Americans?
Bdul Arana
Davao

Mr. Quezon,
In one of your articles in PDI, you failed to mention Mr. Miguel Cuaderno, first Central Bank Governor 1949 – 1960 who was a Sikatuna awardee.
Asun Soler
Pasig

do you think that \”adolf rizal\” issue could be true?

why do Jose Rizal use to call Seiko Usui as O-sei-san?
darwin
lucena philippines

I just would like to say how much I enjoy reading your column in the Enquirer and also your blog.  I am grateful also, when you recommend books for reading like \’closer than brother\’ by alfred mccoy (I even exchanged e-mail with him after reading his book/s).  Also, I\’m looking forward to your visit to Cincinnati on the weekend of February 11.  Bernie Bataclan, one of the organizers is a close friend of mine, so I (together with my wife) will try to attend the events and hope I can meet you in person, and maybe get a bonus of hearing you speak.  If there is anything I can do to help or make your visit more comfortable, pls. do not hesitate to let me know.  Thank you and more power to you.
Ruel Yruma Dato-on
Cincinnati, Ohio

My reaction after reaading REMEMBERING by Manuel L Quezon III posted on Inquirer 26 January 2005 touched my sentiments and sympathy not only for the Jews who suffered during Hitler’s final solution in World War II but at present I am recalling the seemingly final solution orchestrated by political dynasties and greedy economists against the poorer and humbler Filipinos. The rich are getting wealthier and the poor getting miserable . Is Hitler’s final solution the same as the political abuse by our elected leaders who are using all means just to remain in power? For all you know there are as much as many Hitler look alike in our Filipino society. Being gassed in the gas chamber is no different for a Filipino surrounded by corrupt,graft and dishonest politicians and leaders.Filipinos have suffered so much from these colonial-minded perspective.
Manuel Santiago
Penshurst NSW 2222 Australia

Dear Sir,

I look up to you as influential (in ideas and concepts if not in power and wealth) people – opinion makers, so to speak.  I forwarded the attched web page in the hope that you would take the time to ponder on its signficance.

Should you be interested, I will try to arrange to give you a copy of the book.  Just let me know where and how I can have the book delivered.

In the context of the book reviewed on the attached web page, I am Bisaya, Sugbuanon to be more specific, born in Dumaguete, Negros Oriental – as David Martinez, book author although I don\’t recall meeting him in person.  My paternal grandfather is Tagalog (Batangueño) and maternal grandfather, from Pangasinan, via Bacolod or Hiligaynon.
Manuel I. Gloria, Jr.
Mandaluyong

February

Thanks for the great article about my great grandfather, Senate President Quintin Paredes.  Now that all the \”oldies\” in our family have passed away, its good to hear stories about my Double Lolo (as we used to call him) from young history buffs like you.

Cheers and more power!
Atty. Michelle Basco
Manila

I read your latest in the Inquirer (on line, of course) about the American way of waging war.  As usual, your research is impeccable and your mastery of the use of the language is excellent.  But one question comes to mind∑what if the Japanese had walked away from the city as was done at the beginning of the war?  What if they had declared the city an „open city?‰  We can always use hindsight to criticize what occurred in history but unless we endeavor to place ourselves in the shoes of those who were living at the time and making the decisions, we fail to fully grasp the lessons of history.  Does an alliance with the United States sometimes entail risk?  Of course.  But risk is why alliances are formed.  In the long view, I believe that the long Philippine alliance with the United States has benefited both countries.  It is not perfect but neither has it been a failure.

Keep up the thought provoking work.  It makes your readers think and that is a good thing.

Warm regards,
Bill Bish
Newark, New Jersey

Dear Sir,
Thanks for sharing the Jews story in the Philippines. I kept hearing their existence in Manila then, but would not pinpoint how they got there.

Are you related to the late Isidoro Aragon Gonzales? He is my father-in-law and did say your father was related to him. His father was a Don Isidoro Aragon. He changed his last name to his mother\’s family name. Some of his children are in Toronto. The older ones are Nena, Rudy, David, Lydia and many others.

Thanks again,
Rodel J. Ramos
Toronto, Canada

Your articles on your grandfather\’s efforts to save Jews were very touching.  As a Filipino I felt very proud;  but also I realized that indirectly I owe my life to the late President Quezon. As a child of two, I became ill of some childhood disease, and was administered penicillin.  Instead of getting better, my condition deteriorated until I was at the point of death.  Our family physician called in a Jewish doctor who, according to my mother, took one look at me and ordered all medication stopped.  He had recognized the symptoms of anaphylactic shock, a severe allergic reaction to antibiotics.  At that time penicillin was still the miracle drug, and not much was known about any adverse side effects.  Had your grandfather not permitted that Jewish doctor entry into the Philipines, I would not have survived.  It is amazing, really, how the threads of our lives are entwined with those of people we have never met.

Growing up, it never occurred to me to wonder why there were foreign doctors practicing in the Philippines, and why at St. Theresa\’s College we had a foreigner, Mrs. Brings, as our PE teacher.  (Her husband taught physics, I believe, at UE or FEU).  They were simply part of the human landscape of our youth.  After reading your articles, I now realize that they must have been part of the Jewish immigrants who came to the Philippines before the war.

My only regret is that this episode of our history was not known earlier.  A foreigner acquaintance once said that our history is such a sad one;  but as far as I am concerned, it is illuminated by the acts of heroism of our forebears and now, the compassion of your grandfather.
araceli z. lorayes
Ayala Alabang

Dear Manuel,
My mother was one of the Jewish refugees who went to Manila from Nazi Germany.  It was an honor to have you with us in Cincinnati.  I was very touched by your eloquent words, and I know my entire family shares in that sentiment.  Thank you sincerely for participating in such a memorable event.

By the way, I just found your \”The Long View: Celebration\” editorial on the Internet and I forwarded it on to Ralph Priess\’ daughter, who lives near me here in Southern California.

With best wishes,
Leonie Hershfield Kramer
(daughter of Lotte Cassel Hershfield)
Laguna Beach, California

I have two words for this website — Guest Book.  Fans ought to have some place to send you messages of goodwill. Other than that, keep up the good work. You are by far my favorite pinoy writer.
Steve Gelano
Ayala Avenue Makati

We would like to comment on Manuel Quezon III’s wonderfully moving feature in your Feb. 17, 2005 issue about the tribute to his grandfather and the Filipino people that was given in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA last week. He so beautifully expressed the deep gratitude and closeness the Jews, who were saved from certain death at the hands of the Nazis, feel for President Quezon and the Filipino people. We are so glad that the story of their bravery and compassion has now come to the attention of the world. Mr. Quezon III was a very important part of the Cincinnati event and his intelligent and stirring speech at the final program brought all those assembled to their feet. We would personally like to thank him and the Philippine Daily Inquirer for his article.
With gratitude,
Marcia and Ralph Priess
New York, NY 10024

March

I read your story on the Internet. I am the author of “Escape to Manila,” and noted the names of refugee professors mentioned. I have a list of the more than 1,200 Jews who found a haven in the Philippines. You may want to know that Dr. Gustav Heilner was killed during the battle for Manila in 1945. Thanks for publishing the story. The Filipino people can be proud of their history–they helped save lives.
Sincerely,
Frank Ephraim
Chevy Chase, MD 20815

A few days ago, Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo paid tribute to the men who lost their lives in Corregidor.  She may not be aware of it but, during the early months of the Japanese Occupation, her late father, Diosdado Macapagal, together with Teodoro Evangelista, Tomas Benitez and other Malacañang technical aides, organized the Nippongo Club, even while USAFFE troops were still fighting it out in Bataan and Corregidor.  The Club was established to help promote the Japanese Code of Bushido.  After the war, Macapagal served as defense counsel of suspected economic collaborators.

Other prominent Filipinos who collaborated were: Jose P. Laurel (father of the late VP Salvador), Manuel A. Roxas (grandfather of Sen. Mar Roxas), scrap metal provider Carmen Planas (sister of ex-QC Vice Mayor Charito), scrap metal provider Vicente Madrigal (grandfather of Sen. Jamby), Claro M. Recto (grandfather of Sen. Ralph), Jorge Vargas (the UP Museum is named after him), Rafael Alunan (grandfather of former Tourism secretary Raffy Alunan), Jose Yulo, Pio Duran, Quintin Paredes, Benigno Ramos, Emilio Aguinaldo, Artemio Ricarte, Elpidio Quirino (a member of the executive commission), propaganda writer Armando Malay (father in law of Bayan Muna Rep. Satur Ocampo), Eugenio Perez (former father in law of Speaker Jose de VEnecia), propaganda broadcaster Leon Maria Guerrero Jr. (uncle of former Tourism secretary Gemma Cruz Araneta), propaganda leader Arsenio Luz, Arsenio Lacson (member of the neighborhood association), propagandist Camilo Osias, Prospero \”Co-Prosperity Sphere\” Sanidad, Teofilo Sison, Benigno Aquino (father of slain Senator Ninoy Aquino), Eugenio and Fernando Lopez, propaganda painter Fernando Amorsolo, propaganda musician Lucio San Pedro, propaganda actor Fernando Poe Sr., propaganda actress Norma Blancaflor, etc.  Many of these collaborators later claimed that they secretly aided the resistance movement.

In 1965, then President Macapagal reminded the people of the already-forgotten Nalundasan Murder incident after then Senate President Ferdinand Marcos decided to run for president.  Marcos, a Bataan veteran, accused Macapagal of being a collaborator during the Japanese Occupation.  The electorate did not vote for the collaborator.  The rest is history.
Alexander C. Ancelotti
Foster International Residence Hall, Foster Quadrangle, Bloomington, Indiana, USA 47406

we have affinity in two ways: we both root for \’poor mojo\’s almanack\’ and we are both filipinos.
papa osmubal
Macao, South China

Greetings Manuel,

I am retired married to a Filipina. We spend 6 months a year in the US and 6 in the Phils.  I love the Philippines and its people but am also a loyal American and am somewhat miffed when I read articles such as was printed in the March issue of Pinoy, the Filipine American newsmonthly. I have read several articles about the destruction of Manila written by Filipinos and in every case they fail to mention that when the Japanese invaded the Philippines MacArthur declared Manila an open city thereby sparing it from destruction by the invaders.  The Japanese could have done the same but chose to defend it.  The destruction of Manila should be firmly placed on the shoulders of Japan, but none of the pundits I have read seem willing to do so.

I have also read several accounts of the brutality and executions the Filipinos suffered at the hands of the Japanese.

I recently read a book on Philippine history written by a Philippine Professor in which he blamed every atrocity leveled on the Filipinos by the Japanese on the US. Not once in that entire book was anything said about the suffering endured by the Filipinos at the hands of the Japanese
  Am I missing something or is it easier or more \”In\” to get on the \”Hate America\” bandwagon.
Frank Zwicker
Peoria, Ill. USA

It was nice to read in NY Times a familiar name (re: German Jews and the Philippines).  You must have been very proud and represented the
Philippines and your family well in the Ohio celebrations.  It’s amazing what your grandfather did and only a few people in the Philippines knew about it.
Ken Ilio

Manuel
good article but one question. are you in pay of China communists or what? you sound like apologist for dictators here. email me
i am in Taiwan, ready to fight the bastards if they come over.

What side of history are you on, sir?

Dan Bloom, a friend of Filipinos everrywhere

Mr. Quezon,

I read your article “China Relishes Prospect of Getting Upper Hand” in
ArabNews and found it to be very insightful and interesting. Well done.

As I was reading, I was reminded of an interesting tidbit that a friend told me: apparently, the Chinese don’t have the naval power to land
enough troops to effectively invade Taiwan–they have the requisite number of soldiers (and many more), but not enough maritime capacity to
move them quickly enough.

Thought you’d find that at least a little interesting.

Sincerely,
Bobby Zacharias

The name Pacita de los Reyes Phillips may not ring a bell to a male generation that is going ga-ga over the likes of Heart Evangelista, Anne Curtis and Kristine Hermosa.  But certainly, any male who was around during the American colonial period will claim that the beauties of today are no match to Pacita.  Actually, there are also the likes of Susan Magalona and Conchita Sunico.

Pacita de los Reyes Phillips was not just another pretty face.  The Carnival Queen of 1929 also boasted a brilliant legal mind, being a member of the UP College of Law batch that has produced the likes of Arturo Tolentino and Ambrosio Padilla.  The eligible bachelors of her time courted her (like Nicasio Osmeña).  She also had a colorful love that even involved the last President of the Commonwealth.  Even as she aged, she remained radiant and beautiful.

Death came to Pacita de los Reyes Phillips on March 10, 2005.  She was 94 years old.  The Beauty Queen is dead.  Long live the Beauty Queen.
Alexander Ancelotti

To keep myself informed while I am away, I read the online versions of inquirer and manila bulletin from cover to cover, every single day. I haev found, though, that that isn\’t enough. Reading about other people\’s opinion somehow gives me a better feel about what is happening back home.  I have been reading jardinedavies and sassy. Glad that I have found your site now. Another good read.
AnP
Germany

I thought you might like this photo of your aunt Baby Quezon, she was my ninang.  My parents were supposed to go with them to Baler that day but had something else they had to do.  Here is a link to another vintage photo of her: http://www.limjoco.net/thefamily.html and on of Pres. Quezon with my grandparents at my aunt\’s baptism. http://www.limjoco.net/  click the photo on the right.  Also a letter from President Quezon to my grandfather.  I thought you might like more photos of your family for your archive.  My ancestor\’s lives have shaped who I am today and I still honor their lives greatly.
Diana Limjoco Pollard
Tucson AZ

Hi there!

I thought I would just let you know that I appreciate your column especially when you write about dogs.

I am a dog owner myself.  My 4-year old male long-haired Chihuahua does think he is not a dog, but belongs to the human specie.  Short of talking, he is smarter than humans sometimes ∞º

There is a weekly magazine circulated in New Zealand, which is the New Zealand Woman¡œs Weekly.  One of the mainstay columns is written by Bob Kerridge, the head of NZ SPCA, and the way he writes is just so similar to how you treat the issue of having pets.

More power, and hopefully those beloved pets of ours don¡œt suffer much indignity and suffering, (economically, politically, etc), just like the ordinary Filipinos in the Philippines.
Myrna Contreras
Auckland, New Zealand

like  ur  dogs story
rey
mla

Hi… I enjoyed reading/visiting this site.
Thank you
Yogi
Tarlac City

I read your article in AN…..but the point you seem to miss is the why we are upset.

Michael, the husband, only came up with the idea that Terri didn’t want to live like this after there was a settlement and he had a live-in and has since had 2 kids by her.

My problem with the whole thing isn’t whether Terri lives or dies, but that there is someone willing to care for her (her parents) and are not allowed to do so, by a self serving hypocrite who is interested in what money is left.  Why not give the care over to her parents, who don’t want her death?  I just don’t understand giving the care to someone who only wants her dead.

And I don’t understand how the courts can rule this way.

I only hope all those who are so anxious for her death can see that no one deserves to die like this.  I keep hearing that there is no pain….how do they know, and if there is no pain, why does she need morphine?  This is a terrible thing to do to an innocent human being.
Betty Wiggins

April

In one recent column, you said the the Baguio earthquake happened in 1991. It was July 16, 1990. I was a survivor. But then again, I\’m sure others already sent you email correcting you.
Robert JA Basilio Jr.
Quezon City

Sir: I enjoyed reading this column of Manuel L. Quezon III, which Ifind so illuminating regarding what happens after a Pope dies. Let me note,however, that in the third to the last paragraph of his column, the writer must mean “interment” instead of the word “internment.” This must either be typo or a proofreading error.
Sincerely,
Mariano Patalinjug
Yonkers, NY

Here\’s a reaction to your column \”Political prudence\”. I agree with you, her (GMA\’s) conviction is between God and herself\”.  So if she says her visit with the Pope gave her the conviction or courage to break, and join the bloodless revolution, what the heck, let\’s give it to her; she alone and God are witness to the motivations of her prayerfully Catholic heart and where on this planet she draws her sublime inspirations.  In the same mannner, if I say God inspired me to hack somebody and cut him into tiny little pieces because, well, he is the AntiChrist, who is anyone to question my conviction?
Erik Malubay
Laog City

Wow! It\’s one of those books that I just have to own. Congratulations on \”Malacanan Palace,\” I have to say the best one on the subject. Loved the writing, and photographs old and new. I have special memories of Malacanang. As a school boy from neighboring St. Jude Catholic School, I would be brought there by my yaya when I happened to have half day classes on Saturdays. Entrance on Saturday was free! It\’s usually the last day of the exam week. I remember marveling at the grandness of it all–from walking up via the grand staircase and even having the chance to see Cory Aquino when she passed by the reception hall. I was really happy and grateful to be able to tour the now restricted parts of the palace as a school boy. Learned a lot during those tours! I remember seeing Marcos\’ rooms, Imelda\’s collection of shoes and perfume. On the way out, I bought a Malacanang postcard. I went back many times more–twice during President Ramos\’ time to the early years of the Erap administration when a room was dedicated to a president. My favorite was the Laurel Library. After that, I wrote a feature on the museum for our high school paper. I was saddened that the museum had to be closed for a time during PGMA\’s term. I was just so happy to be able to go back, this time as a reporter covering Malacanang (for ABS-CBN). I subbed for Tony Velasquez and got the chance to be seated up front when Press Secretary Bunye gave a presscon in Kalayaan Hall. While waiting for the presscon to start, my leisurely wandering led me to the new museum, now in Kalayaan hall where I was given a personal tour by the staff. Going back to the book, many thanks to the team for producing an important work. It\’s something that I don\’t mind paying for. I would say it\’s my first important purchase after receiving my first pay check. Hoping to go back to the Palace again and walk through history once more. Kudos! 
Willard Cheng
Manila

I was saw your father, in soutane, when we useto march in Quezon day parades in Quezon City.
It was the years late 40′s and early 50′s.For a while your father Nonong disappeared.
You write with a great historical sense.
maximo p.fabella

Dear Manuel Quezon III,

When I was a Catholic I was sympathetic towards Liberation Theology which agonised over the inequalities of humans. I can
understand their agony. In the 4th century, the Church discarded the twin laws of karma and reincarnation (KR) although Jesus and
Paul accepted them. Jesus threatened Simon with the karmic law (Mt. 26, 52): “Put thy sword into its place for he who takes the sword
shall perish by the sword.” Paul threatened the Galatians with the karmic law: “Whatever a man sows that he will also reap.” (Gal. 6,
8). Paul threatened the Colossians with the karmic law: “But he who does a wrong will be repaid for what he has done, and there is no
partiality.” (Col. 3, 25). S. Paul reprimanded the Corinthians, “Nay, to begin with, it is altogether a defect in you that you have lawsuits
one with another? Why not rather be defrauded?” (1 Cor. 6, 7). The basis of the reprimand? “But you yourselves do wrong and
defraud.” In other words, the complainant was just getting a dose of his own medicine.

Jesus believed in reincarnation. (For 300 years, the Church did.) Twice he announced that John the Baptist was the reincarnation of
Elias, the Old Testament prophet. Check Mt. 11, 14 and Mt. 17, 12-13. Elias slashed the throats of 450 priests of Baal, a heinous crime.
He was not punished for it right away. But when he came back as John, he got a dose of his own medicine when he fell into the hands
of Herod and suffered irreversible brain damage. Jesus was unmoved by the fate of his cousin. The requirements of justice had to be
met. So, if KR were valid, nothing  ever happens to us which is undeserved. Check Luke 13, 1-5. It was about the death of two groups
of Galileans. One group was massacred by Pilate while worshipping in the temple. The other group was killed when the tower of Siloe
fell on it.  Explanation? “Unless you repent, you will perish in the same manner.” Kinarma pala yung mga Galileans. Luke l7, 1 is
corollary to Luke 13, 1-5: “It is impossible that scandals should not come; but woe to him through whom they come.” Jesus was not an
interventionist like John Paul II who tried to stick his fingers into every pie which smelled of sin. Two brothers, fighting over an
inheritance approached him. Both were given the brush off, “Man, who has appointed me a judge or arbitrator over you.” (Luke 12, 14).
The Church paid a heavy price for discarding KR. It was a great loss of light. She no longer has a satisfactory explanation for the inequalities that exist among humans. Liberation theologians are inclined to believe that poverty is undeserved and God needs our help to relieve the poor of their burden.
Norberto Penas, Jr., MD
Magsaysay Ave., Naga City

June

I totally disagree with Mr Quezon’s opinion! Phil Amb Tony Modena did the right thing speaking out against racist Israeli police/immigration officials’ treatment of Pinoys in Israel. Good thing he gave them a piece of his mind. High time! Regrettably, he “apologized” for some words that are “sensitive” to Jews. I say, Amb Modena needn’t apologize at all for speaking out those same words he used! The human rights of pinoys were violated by Israeli officials. Aren’t we Pinoys entitled to any respect? During WWII, didn’t we protect Jewish lives and accept Jews into our country? Israel might have forgotten? If words like nazi, gestapo, holocaust, and the like could create an uproar in Israel, Amb Modena’s use of them was on the right track since he complained (several times but got ignored, it seems!) about the gestapo-style raids Israeli officials conducted upon Pinoy homes in Israel. Yes, I regret he apologized for saying the “right things”! But I’m happy for us Pinoys, he complained thru the Israeli press and SAID those things in the first place…! The way Pinoys were treated, based on his report or interview in Israel were indeed comparable to the gestapo style raids the nazis did in WWII=
rizal victoria
hohenstauferallee 39

Nabubuksan ang mga isipan, nakikita na ang liwanag .. ang ating mga kababayan.
          The blind now see, the deaf now hear, the Truth is now coming out.

          Gloria Arroyo occupies Malacanan illegitimately. The woman does not have
          any constitutional right and no moral right to govern the nation.

          She was the one who destabilized the country. Is the one who destabilizes.
          And will be the one who will have destabilized the future of our children and
          grandchildren.

    Malacanan ..

          you cabal of evil, you namecall those who disagree with you as “destabilizers”.
          Now, will you also namecall the quiet-non-politician-just-an-ordinary-Filipino-taxpayer
          Manuel L Quezon III – the grandson of great Phil President Manuel L Quezon – also
          a “destabilizer” ?

          Gloria Pinocchia ..

              you derisively call those who oppose you .. as “marauders of democracy”.
              Is the grandson of Manuel L Quezon, also a “marauder” of democracy”.

              O the wrath of the Filipino people that you are building, O Pinocchia ka.

  Cory Aquino says she’s been praying that the Truth come out. What more do you need,
          Cory ? A prestigious and professional Australian firm has already confirmed that
          the tapes .. were conversations between Gloria Arroyo and Comelec’s Garcilliano.
 
          Gloria Arroyo specifically asking Comelec’s Garcilliano to ensure that she “wins”
          by at least a million “votes”.

          Cory, you will not find Truth for as long as you spend evenings playing mahjong with
          the Arroyos.
Eric
New Jersey, USA

Dear Manuel Quezon III

Even though I lived here in overseas, I am truly proud of my being Filipino, that is why I always have time to read your on line articles at the Inquirer.I like your style of writing.If you need help don’t hesitate to contact me.

My insight about what is happening to our dear Republic of the Philippine spurs me on to think and make present again discussions during our History of Philosophy Class back in our seminary days. Incidentally, Samuel Ong has been lodge in the seminary for quite a number of days. San Carlos Seminary steals the show ( being neutral I suppose)  from the rich and powerful politicians.I remember the discussions as lively as ever, I was fascinated in reading the French Revolution and a story goes like this:
   
A man living in a village outside Paris during the Revolution met a friend fresh from the city and asked what was happening. “It’s awful,” was the reply, “they’re cutting off heads by the thousands.”

“Good Heavens! Surely not heads,” he cried “Why, I’m a hatter.”

“It’s awful”, is my reply to the situation now of our republic, I’m not a hatter but a priest but I want a revolution that should give long lasting lessons to dishonest people like GMA and her cohorts, not by cutting their heads but by educating the majority grassroots and the mass of disgusted and indifferent people the true meaning of revolution.

I live here in Australia and I noticed that if politicians here were in the middle of scandal, they simply resign.Literally they can catch corrupt leaders here because of advanced surveillance gadgets and hidden cameras and  I do give credulity to the wiretapped conversation between GMA and the COMELEC people, I believe its was true. The Australian Federal government indeed do some of surveillance in the past of their leaders.

Now, I do not prefer EDSA-type of revolution (it lacked depth)because we have produced out of that revolution people with “messianic complex” and a lot of crab-mentality exposures. We need the revolution of  the real selfless, honest and dedicated who can administer with credibility our Filipino government .Meanwhile Pro-GMA people  Pro- Erap politicians, the Leftists, the Rightists, NPA’s , they  have displayed their wares.We’ve seen and tried and tested actors and actresses, educated and the uneducated run the country. This last one even had a Ph D and look what she had done to our lovely country. We have felt the results of that and our country is becoming poorer. Many will say cut off their heads, but at the end of the day who will have the last cry? Ask the simple rural village poverty dire people,probably they will say:
“I cried because I’m betting at jueteng.”
Fr Manuel Santiago
Assistant Priest
ST  DECLAN’S PARISH
PENSHURST NSW Australia

I fully support and agree with the manifesto. I admire his courage, loyalty, and nationalism. I am an avid reader/viewer of the PDI/Inq7 the last 15+ years. This is my first to ever communicate as I was inspired by the manifesto. Like him, I was a GMA supporter too.
leny villareal
fort lauderdale,florida; USA

Dear Mr. Quezon; I am a long suffering USAFFE veteran from the injustice done to us by the American Congress of 1946. If I talk of an ungrateful act that one takes the cake. Hardly had the smoke of battle died down from our wars with the Japanese when America dropped another “atomic bomb” against their supposed friends, the Filipino=American veterans. It was totally shameless. And it was all because of money. I read with much interest your article about the Israelis giving interest to our cause. I believe that is good news. The American Jews have a big clout on the workings of the American Congress. Their lobbyists are a formidable force and likely the Congressmen would lend them an ear. Hope so. Many years ago, we, the members of the Fil-Am veterans Federation of the greater Los Angeles, California area decided to seek official help from the American politicians. This Federation was once headed by my classmate Antonio Rubin as president. The first order of battle was to solicit the support of Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Angeles. We got a very sympathetic response from the good mayor. But he told us that the US Congress was not within his province. However he told us that he would ask the help of his friend Congressman Dymally of LA. We were fortunate that Congressman Dymally saw the injustice done to us. Forthwith, Congressman Dymally filed a bill in Congress to rectify the mistake heaped upon us. As far as I know Congressman Dymally’s Congressional bill was the first of its kind to attempt to restore the rights and benefits due the Fil-Am veterans. It was originally supported by only three lawmakers. Although success has not been attained it is hopeful that success may yet come as more than two hundred (200) US Congressmen now (2004) support the Filipino Veterans Equity Act. The tragedy that fell upon the USAFFE and the Recognized Guerilla veterans was caused by the passage of the Rescission Act of 1946. This Act was conceived in deceit and shamelessness. Pity the majority of the good American people who have to suffer from the indignity of the label, INGRATE. The Rescission Act was attached to the Budget Bill as a rider. As such, it did not enjoy a hearing from the members of Congress so the body could deliberate on the merits of the issue. It became obvious that the authors’ intentions were to keep it from deliberations. They succeeded and rightfully put the American people to shame. I assumed this indictment because the every day American is a person of fairness and integrity. It must have shocked President Harry S. Truman when he discovered the rider with the budget bill. He immediately objected to it saying that it is unfair to the loyal Filipino veterans. But the deceitful authors of the Rescission Act knew from the beginning that the President could not but sign the Budget Bill or the American bureaucracy would stop operating. With strong objections the President signed the Budget Bill into law. In fairness, he instructed two senior members of his cabinet and the Chairman of the Veterans Administration to correct the damage done to the Fil-Am veterans. Regretfully, after sixty years and up to the present, the crying demands for their rightful dues by the Filipino veterans have been lefty unanswered by the American government. . Your article of May 30, 2005 mentioned Congressman John Dingell of Michigan. I know the very highly respected congressman from Detroit. I resided in his district. In fact, he had much to do when I took my allegiance as an American citizen way back in 1986. He was kind to assist me in clearing up with my legal requirements. As is true with American representatives to the US Congress, letters sent to them by their constituents are almost always answered by them. However, I wrote him one letter that he did not answer. I mention this because it has to do with your article of May 30 that said Mr. Dingell supports the Filipino veterans claim. This is good news especially for us Bil-Am Vets. Years back I found out that Mr. Dingell’s name did not seem to among the list that supports the Fil-Am vets. My letter to him was precisely about asking him to join the other supporters. I mentioned that his power and influence over the members of Congress would help our cause immensely. Why he did not answer my letter is quite clear to me now. I wrote him when I was already a resident of California. Your article has made me happy knowing that the venerable Congressman John Dingell is after all a supporter of our cause. I thank him for that. I am grateful. Mr. Quezon thank you for the information. A number of US senators and congressmen have labored consistently year in and year out to correct the mistake created by the Rescission Act of 1946. As I said they number over two hundred in the United States Capitol. I cannot mention all their names now but outstanding among them in my recollections are Senator Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, the steadfast Congressman Cunningham and my friend Congressman Bob Filner of San Diego, California. Nobody is more consistent and persistent than Mr. Inouye of course. On January 25, 2005 during the 1st Session of the 109th Congress, Mr. Inouye filed again a watered down Filipino Veterans Equity Act of 2005 No. S 146 in the hope that because of its much less concerns for compensation his new bill would turn into law this year. Some Congressmen have likewise filed similar Acts in the lower house of Congress. This is all about money in the United States. But not for us. We are seeking restitution of our rights. And for money, honor and gratitude are taking a long time to be restored to the American people. I am a resident of California, USA.
Nilo Buenaflor
Bagong Ilog, Pasig City

Sa lathalang ito na nagbabanggit ng kaalaman, pagtitis at katalinuhan ay pinatutunayang ang isang uri ng paraan na makagagamot sa ating pang pulitikang problema, pang ekonomiyang solusyon at pagtatagulmpay ng layunin sa pamamagitan ng kaalaman,katalinuhan at pagtitiis. Gusto ko sanang makapagbigay ng aking kuro-kuro sa pamamagitan ng pilosopiya ng tula na tungkol din sa mga paghihirap, kaalaman at katalinuhan na mayroroon naman kunting solusyon: Huling Paala-ala Paala-alang lahat sa kababayan, panaho’y hinog na nararapat lamang, tayo ng gumising ating umpisahan. Huling paraan na sasagip sa bayan. Maghahandog tayo ating makakaya, ng bayan ay mahango dalita’t dusa, buhay kalusogan na iyong ibinigay, lilingonin naming para ka mabuhay. Sa paraang ito at wala ng iba pa, kahirapa’t lumbay ika’y liligaya. Mawawala na yong dinustang lagayan, baging pumulupot iyong mga kamay. Isa-isang aalsin mga pulupot, mga kamay nagpayamang mga imbot, Pag-ayaw patangal pulupot na baging, lakas mamamayan siyang magtatanggal. Tayong pinagpalang napadpad malayo, magipon ng pera pang ales ng baging. Daming nakatira labas Pilipinas, Pulupot na baging ay kayang alisin.. Mga kababayan manalig po tayo, bayan ay aangat magiging maunlad. Magipon po tayo kanya-kanyang bangko, pagsama-samahin pagdatin ng oras. Habang di dumadating oras babala. Bigyan natin taning kinauukulan. Pag di tumino’t pinagbuti ang bayan, gastosin ang perang kinakailangan. Limang milyones tayong maguuwian. Kasamang lulusob sampong milyong bayan.. Mga sundalo, magaaral at.mangmang, papaltan lahat yong walang pakundangan. Hushusgahan lahat mga nagpayaman. Naging milyong milyong mga kabuhayan. Nagpayama’t kinupit pera ng bayan, Ibabalik natin mga mamamayan. Diyos ng pab-ibig kami’y bindisyonan. Pagpalain bansang nagbigay ng buhay. Kami’y tulutan mong aming magampanan, Tulungan linisin bayang minamahal. Tulain po natin ang ating pag-asa. Ibando sa lahat may puso at diwa. Paala-alang ito kinaukulan, Sa nangungurakot at baging ng bayan. Paala-alang lahat sa kababayan, panaho’y hinog na nararapat lamang, tayo ng gumising ating umpisahan. Huling paraan na sasagip sa bayan. Maghahandog tayo ating makakaya, ng bayan ay mahango dalita’t dusa, buhay kalusogan na iyong ibinigay, lilingonin naming para ka mabuhay. Sa paraang ito at wala ng iba pa, kahirapa’t lumbay ika’y liligaya. Mawawala na yong dinustang lagayan, baging pumulupot iyong mga kamay. Isa-isang aalsin mga pulupot, mga kamay nagpayamang mga imbot, Pag-ayaw patangal pulupot na baging, lakas mamamayan siyang magtatanggal. Tayong pinagpalang napadpad malayo, magipon ng pera pang ales ng baging. Daming nakatira labas Pilipinas, Pulupot na baging ay kayang alisin.. Mga kababayan manalig po tayo, bayan ay aangat magiging maunlad. Magipon po tayo kanya-kanyang bangko, pagsama-samahin pagdatin ng oras. Habang di dumadating oras babala. Bigyan natin taning kinauukulan. Pag di tumino’t pinagbuti ang bayan, gastosin ang perang kinakailangan. Limang milyones tayong maguuwian. Kasamang lulusob sampong milyong bayan.. Mga sundalo, magaaral at.mangmang, papaltan lahat yong walang pakundangan. Hushusgahan lahat mga nagpayaman. Naging milyong milyong mga kabuhayan. Nagpayama’t kinupit pera ng bayan, Ibabalik natin mga mamamayan. Diyos ng pab-ibig kami’y bindisyonan. Pagpalain bansang nagbigay ng buhay. Kami’y tulutan mong aming magampanan, Tulungan linisin bayang minamahal. Tulain po natin ang ating pag-asa. Ibando sa lahat may puso at diwa. Paala-alang ito kinaukulan, Sa nangungurakot at baging ng bayan. Tayo’y mamamatay walang kaligtasan. Pangaraping bago tayo ay pumanaw, makitang bayan mo’y maningning ang kulay, wala ng lagayan, wala ng kidnapan. Tayo’y mamamatay walang pagmalaki.. karatig bayan tayo ay naiwanan, Ekonomia’t moral tayo’y hulihan. Pero dunong ng ulo nasa unahan. Sawing ating bayan ay di makatakbo. Hindi makalakad tamang mano-mano. Pumantay sa takbo karatig bayan ko, Pero dunong ng ulo di madihado. Bago man lang pumikit mga mata ko. Makita kang hiyas mga nagniningning, Kahit saang bansa Pinoy makarating, Tayo ay igagalang at pupurihin. 1835 hanggang 1838 nang ihabi, loob ng kulungan ng mga Kastila, Francisco Balagtas nagdalita’t hirap, Sa tula’y nasulat ang paghihimagsik. Kulang kulang limangpung taon dumaan, Sinulat ni Rizal pangaapi sa bayan. Sa laki ng kanyang pag-ibig sa bayan, Pinatay, binaril ng mga dayuhan. Isa Diwa natin ang Huling Paalam. Bago binaril kaniyang naidaing, pag-ibig sa Bayan perlas ng silangan, buhay inihandog baya’y matimawa. Kalooban natin nararapat lamang, Ating aligatain, kurokuruin, huling paalam niya pinagdaingan, Susunod na talata dapat magunita: “Kung dugo ang iyong kinakailangan, sa ikadidilag ng iyong pagsilang. Dugo ko’y ibobot kahit isa man lamang, Sa ngumingiti mong sinag ay kuminang.. Kung libingan ko ay limot na ng madla. At wala ng krus o bato mang tanda. Sa mga magsasaka ipaubaya, bunkali’t isabog ang natiping lupa. Ang mga abo ko bago pa ilang lang, Mauwi sa wala na pinanggalingan, makalat muna para kapupunan, ng iyong alabok sa lupang tungtungan“. Namnamin natin mga handog ni Rizal. pagtulong natin kukurampot kunti lang. Kanyang kahilingan magkaisang tunay. Ng mapanuto na bayang minamahal.. Kurampot ngunit matutuwa si Rizal. Kunting tulong magagalak Bonifacio.. Mangigiti na mga bayaning pare. Sina Padre Zamora, Gomez at Burgos. Idalangin nating sa Poong Bathala, Lumikha sa atin at lahat ng bagay, Matuwid ang takbo bayang iniwanan, Ng loobin nati’y tunay na magdiwang. Tayo’y mamamatay walang kaligtasan. Pangaraping bago tayo ay pumanaw, makitang bayan mo’y maningning ang kulay, wala ng lagayan, wala ng kidnapan. Tayo’y mamamatay walang pagmalaki.. karatig bayan tayo ay naiwanan, Ekonomia’t moral tayo’y hulihan. Pero dunong ng ulo nasa unahan. Sawing ating bayan ay di makatakbo. Hindi makalakad tamang mano-mano. Pumantay sa takbo karatig bayan ko, Pero dunong ng ulo di madihado. Bago man lang pumikit mga mata ko. Makita kang hiyas mga nagniningning, Kahit saang bansa Pinoy makarating, Tayo ay igagalang at pupurihin. 1835 hanggang 1838 nang ihabi, loob ng kulungan ng mga Kastila, Francisco Balagtas nagdalita’t hirap, Sa tula’y nasulat ang paghihimagsik. Kulang kulang limangpung taon dumaan, Sinulat ni Rizal pangaapi sa bayan. Sa laki ng kanyang pag-ibig sa bayan, Pinatay, binaril ng mga dayuhan. Isa Diwa natin ang Huling Paalam. Bago binaril kaniyang naidaing, pag-ibig sa Bayan perlas ng silangan, buhay inihandog baya’y matimawa. Kalooban natin nararapat lamang, Ating aligatain, kurokuruin, huling paalam niya pinagdaingan, Susunod na talata dapat magunita: “Kung dugo ang iyong kinakailangan, sa ikadidilag ng iyong pagsilang. Dugo ko’y ibobot kahit isa man lamang, Sa ngumingiti mong sinag ay kuminang.. Kung libingan ko ay limot na ng madla. At wala ng krus o bato mang tanda. Sa mga magsasaka ipaubaya, bunkali’t isabog ang natiping lupa. Ang mga abo ko bago pa ilang lang, Mauwi sa wala na pinanggalingan, makalat muna para kapupunan, ng iyong alabok sa lupang tungtungan“. Namnamin natin mga handog ni Rizal. pagtulong natin kukurampot kunti lang. Kanyang kahilingan magkaisang tunay. Ng mapanuto na bayang minamahal.. Kurampot ngunit matutuwa si Rizal. Kunting tulong magagalak Bonifacio.. Mangigiti na mga bayaning pare. Sina Padre Zamora, Gomez at Burgos. Idalangin nating sa Poong Bathala, Lumikha sa atin at lahat ng bagay, Matuwid ang takbo bayang iniwanan, Ng loobin nati’y tunay na magdiwang. (Handog sa kaarawan ni Dr. Jose Rizal sa ika 19 ng Junio ni Carlos Caramanzana} .
Carlos Caramanzana
Melanie Drive, New York 11554

Hi mlq3,

Your column Redemption today in the Inquirer is good. I agree with you 100%.

GMA has broken a basic act of human goodness which is HONESTY .

No one will believe her now even in the international community – She won by cheating, fair and square!

The only way out for her to exit graciously is to Apologize again for her dishonesty and cheating and then Resign – she will go down in our history as one of the few leaders who have courage and delicadeza.

But if she stays, this will be more trouble for her , I think she can’t sleep at night now…

I did not vote for her in the last election , but I accepted her thinking she won fairly, but Filipinos are not so stupid to not interpret the tape transcript which she admitted as her, to be not talking about “cheating” – nobody would like to look up for a “cheating-dishonest” president, it is basically wrong logic..

This has become a moral issue now, not political ..

Hope we all come out of this troubled times , peacefully and much stronger as a nation and people.

Thank you.

Best Regards,
OMAR T. LOPEZ

July

Good morning. I would just like to inquire why you said that Atty. Paguia is not credible and that you said ex-Atty? What I know is that he is suspended but not disbarred. Does that make him ex-Atty? Please clarify.

I am not a lawyer nor am I a law student, however, I am concerned about what is happening to our country. I am also very particular about the informations I get from radio commentaries as well as talk shows on tv.

I don’t know Atty. Paguia personally but I think it was unfair to say comments wherein he was not in the show to defend himself.
I visited your website but your comments section is closed.

Please be very careful with what you say on television not only about Atty. Paguia but your other comments as well regarding other personalities.

Thank you and hope to hear from you.
Cecile of Lipa City

Dear Mr. Quezon,

Warm greetings to you. I read your columns and am one of your aivd readers. I hope you will continue the tradition of excellence in writing and discerning insights.

I am a Baha’i, and am an astute student of history and current events. Although I have a different view(s) and perspectives of the current trends or decline and disturbing twists in our country, we share our deep concerns and searching for consultative solutions to the challenges facing our country.

More power to you.

With deep respect,
Stephen A. Ramo

Dear Mr. Quezon,

I would like to thank you for writing truthfully and honestly about what is happening in the Philippines.

I am one of the Filipinos who left the country in the early part of this decade.  Like my other friends, I
was also overseas-educated and upon completing our degrees we opted to return to the Philippines to help
out in nation-building only to be confronted by the harsh reality that our ability to make changes is
largely hindered by a system that does not value what we can do.  We gave up one by one and most of the
people in my inner circle of friends have left the country. I have been the first to become a naturalised
citizen of another country. While I love my adopted country, I still have concern for the country of my
birth and to those who are left behind.

It was only last week when the seriousness of the political situation in the Philippines was brought to
my attention. A good lawyer friend of mine who used to work at the Supreme Court then left to join one of the
largest law firms in the country sent me a SMS asking me about what I thought about GMA’s public apology the
night before. I was really unaware of what happened and so I decided to read the on-line version of the
major Philippine dailies and it was then that I found out what happened.  I doubted the credibility of the
last elections but I was deeply shocked to find out what the Garci tape was all about with the culmination
in GMA’s public apology.  Within the same day, I received emails from friends asking about how to
migrate to other countries.  I was getting worried because these were the same people who have
discouraged me from leaving and are now considering to leave.

Over the weekend, Australian TV and newspapers featured the political crisis in the Philippines.  I
had lunch with other Filipino Australians on Sunday and we only had one conclusion…the Office of the
Presidency has been discredited with what has been done and the incumbent should really consider
resigning.  We only had one word to describe the person who decides to stay on despite the loss of
credibility and respect (and of course the mandate of the people which may have never been there in the
first place) – “Napaka-kapal.”  How could such person face other people with a straight face and claim to be
a credible leader of the country?  Once again, we have proven that the level of educational qualification is
not a guarantee for credibility and integrity.  I wonder if these educated leaders got their degrees
honestly or if they cheated and plagiarised a lot when they were still students. I will not be surprised if
they did.
Ian Gutierrez
Australia

Mr. Quezon,

To tell you honestly sir, I was surprised with your article ‘ Redemptiom’ dated June 30, 2005 at the PDI. I never
expected such coming from any inquirer columnist except for mr. de quiros. From what I’ve observed, PDI
caters only to intellectuals, the educated, the untouchable elite, the dignified makati businessmen, the cultured but never for the masses.

I never really expected that somebody like you would even notice Mrs. Poe. The intellectual snobs quickly
dismissed and insulted her. Alam niyo po, dito sa ating bansa, kapag hindi po makapag-ingles ng diretso
ang isang tao, napakababa po ng pagtingin sa kanya. Ang batayan po ng kagalingan ng isang tao ay ang husay
sa pagsasalita ng wikang banyaga at kung saan ito nakatapos. Nakakalungkot sapagkat may mga taong
katulad ni Mrs. Poe na marahil ay mas may kabuluhan  pa ang buhay kaysa sa mga tulad ni Katrina Legarda na
sobrang arogante at kung ano-ano ang sinasabi sa talk shows. Para po bang wala nang halaga ang basic values
sa buhay natin. Kapag kakampi po nila ang gumagawa ng anomalya, nagiging tama po ito kahit kitang-kita na
mali. Inaabuso po nila ang paggamit sa pangalan ng Dyos at pagtatago sa likod ng  Rule of Law na sadyang
nalilimutan nila kapag hindi na pabor sa kanila. Unang una napo si cory acquino na dalwang beses binaliwala
ang Constitution kasama ang civil society niya. Kapag po magagamit nila ito upang ipagtanggol ang kakampi at
kauri nila bigla nilang naalalang igalang ang Constitution. Wala naman po akong kinakampihan subalit
malinaw pa po sa sikat ng araw ang umiiral na double standard.

Nagpapasalamat lang po ako at di kayo nagbubulagbulagan at nagbibingibingihan.
Nagpapasalamat lang po ako at sa kabila ng pagbaha ng pera sa media ay dip o kayo natatakot maglahad ng
inyong tunay na pananaw. Bawal napo kasi ngayon ang maging kritikal sa gobyerno at may bansag na agad na
destabilizer. Pati nga po mga jeep at bus ay dina maaaring magsakay ng mga sasama sa mga pagkilos.
Napakarami pong pinagbabawal.

I wish to thank you for recognizing the simplicity, sincerity and humility in the person of Mrs. Poe. And
most of all, I would like to congratulate you for still knowing the great difference between good and
evil, between right and wrong. I just couldn’t imagine how this nation could be run by people who have
totally lost their sense of  propriety and who will do just anything to cling to power.
noemi francisco

Dear Sir,

Naniniwala akong isa ako sa maraming humahanga sa iyong pagsulat.  Hindi “politicalized” and not so “opinionated” ang style mo based on what I’ve read so far excluding subject column of June 30.

I beg to disagree to these particular lines and I quote you”Time and again, Susan Roces has proven herself prudent and wise, with the interest of the country truly in her mind and heart.  She has shown her unswerving devotion to peace, order, property and propriety” unquote.  Based on the following am I right to assume that you truly believe in Susan’s statement that Gloria Arroyo had stolen the presidency twice.  The statement implies that she does not believe on the constitutional ruling of the Supreme Court when Ms. Arroyo was initially appointed as the executive head in 2001.

Incidentally, where is she during the martial law?

Honestly, I admire Ms. Roces as an actress and being loyal to her friends, ninong and ninang sa kasal.  There is nothing wrong being loyal to your peers.  However, I still cling to your grandfather’s famous line “that my loyalty to my party ends where my loyalty to my country begins” or something to this effect.

Keep up the good works.

Regards,
Arcy F. Sibal
Manggahan, Sta. Maria

I can’t help but agree with MLQ3. Though GMA was elected with a slim majority of the votes as compared to her nearest rival, I don’t believe this gave her the mandate completely. That’s the reason for the tactical maneuvers re having herself proclaimed at the earliest possible time, which I think was tantamount to political suicide. She was a dead duck floating on the water even before her “enemies” got the chance to train their collective guns on her. And to paraphrase MLQ3, it’ll just be a matter of time, a very short time perhaps, for the country to end up in
an even bigger s**thole than it’s in. When that happens, we’ll be back to the bad old days of Martial Rule and only a very few of us will be lucky enough to get out of dodge city like the last time.
Erwin Macawili
Jacana, Vic Australia 3047

Bravo on your guts, but poor on your selection for change. You are directly asking Filipinos to trust Susan Roces? Yikes!  Sorry, but she’s be a proponent for disaster not change. Plus good actress, not to forget. Respectably, Roces has her convictions, but not to ideally replace Arroyo. Yes, trust is not there, but the country’s fate for economic doom will happen faster if a Roces administration comes to life. Pls. use your ink to educate the masses to choose someone else who has another realistic economic platform–talk about experience in the workplace, a person for others, etc, out of the line of ex-prez candidates, please. If you are looking within the showbiz line up, put someone else with some to good education background–Sharon Cuneta, who’s from St. Paul’s and at least married to a professional and educated workerbee, or Vilma Santos, who’s at least had experience politiking. Unfortunately, here’s the sad reality — ALL presidents lie, no matter what country, what page in time. Majority don’t get caught. But if you have even a glimpse into their daily dealings with foreign entities, military covert operations, mutual treaties… lots of reading in between the lines have compromised the bottom peso of each hard working and honest, tax-paying Filipino. Presidents have to, or else national security would always be at stake. Pls. endorse another candidate…and change your morning beverage…whatever it is.
Margaret Lacson

To columnist MLQIII: You took a stand based on principle and a desire to hold GMA accountable. Others speak out of fear, money and self-interest (Cory, Soliven, Monsod, Olivares, Defensor, Bunyi, De Venecia, Drilon, Pichay, Lapid, Salceda, Dinky Soliman, Bondoc, etc.) Hats off to you as one of the very few principled writers/columnist in a sea of paid hacks. Please keep up the good work. You truly are a credit to the famous name you carry.
franny belza
Kuwait City

Mabuhay! na bati para sa iyong mga pananaw. I only wish everybody has the same line of thinking as you do then the Philippines again will be a great country. I work abroad at talagang nakakahiya ang mga nangyayari sa atin. It seems most of our people are looking at the Philippines from within only. Hello! kapwa ko mga Pilipino there are people beyond our shores watching and talking about us kung ano ang mga nakakatawa at nakakahiya na ginagawa natin.
kiko kiko

Dear Mr. Quezon,

I read your article Redemption. Somewhat they mirror many of my personal sentiments about the issue of the times. I must thank you for your forthright and unequivocal position.

Well, perhaps, it is time for those  ‘up there’ in establishment who have plenty to lose when the status is destabilized to think more on the long-view rather than clutching on to shortsighted interests. Postponing the inevitable is, anyway, a no-win option.

There is a saying I recently came across  – ‘Wine is strong, king is stronger, woman is strongest, BUT truth conquers all’. Interesting.

* I wrote you on the date above but I could not get my email through as I got your email address wrong (‘miq3′ instead of ‘mlq3′). Since then substantial events have probably made whatever correspondence academic and
moot). Anyway I just wanted to let you know that I find your column more and more relevant and interesting. By the way, so many schools, churches, etc. are coming up with their positions on this issue and most statemens are
simply too complex, tortured, and convoluted for me to comprehend, much more, swallow. Almost all say they are after the ‘truth’. Can’t they recognize one when it is already staring them face on? Thanks.
Jose Ma. S. Lopez

Lest we all fall into the trap of thinking that Cory should be admired for speaking out on important
matters,  we should be reminded of her recent history of doing so.

1)Whatever other people may think otherwise it is without question that the presidency of
Fidel Ramos led the Philippines to prosperity relative to all other presidents. This was one of the impetus
for charter change which Ramos supporters had enough signatures to start the ball rolling. In Cory Aquino’s
mind as well as many others , this was only seen as a move to perpetuate Ramos in power and nothing else.
Maybe she could  not admit that Ramos was a much better leader than her given the stability and
prosperity prevalent at the time. Maybe she really felt that no one, however good a leader, should be
given a chance to remain in power in order not to create another Marcos nightmare. But she and Cardinal
Sin would have none of this nevertheless and took to the streets against charter change. If you look at the
archives of pictures at the time an ominous vision of what was in store for Filipinos was the smiling Joseph
Estrada standing next to Cory and Cardinal Sin in those protest rallies.

2)In the 1998 elections, Cory came out in support of  Manila Mayor Fred Lim who after losing the election
later became Erap’s DILG Secretary and defended the disgraced regime till the end refusing to join edsa
dos and at  present still remains an opposition senator allied with the erap/fpj forces.

3)In the 2004 elections, Cory Aquino (who claims to be concerned about the welfare and plight of the
Philippines) refrained from supporting any presidential candidate. Isnt it hypocrisy of the
highest nature when one says she needs to speak her mind for the benefit of the people yet refuses to make
her thoughts known on one of the most important decisions the public will make in regards to their
future? Or maybe she decided after the Fred Lim fiasco, that it would be too embarrassing for her to
support another losing candidate and admit her declining influence among the voters. This would
indicate that  preserving her political legacy is more important to her than her claim that she really cares
for the welfare of the people.

Cory may be honest and sincere in her mind. She may be a hero in the mind of others. But the best service it
seems she can give is to remain the housewife she was when Ninoy was alive and just keep her mouth shut
like when Nonoy was alive and let the others who know better do the talking. Her legacy is still strong.
Let us hope it does not slowly fade into meaningless oblivion as she posits herself as the supposed concience of the Philippines time and time again.
a concerned citizen with a noted political background
(so necessarily anonymous)

Dear Mr. Quezon,

History and economics weigh heavily in favor of Mindanao independence, making its occurence inevitable. Even though Gloria Arroyo’s spin doctors are making a travesty of this noble aspiration by implying that such an event will only materialize if she is ousted, Mindanao independence makes too much sense to be trivialized by political gimmickry. Some Mindanao leaders may allow themselves to be used by a beleaguered President for selfish and myopic ends, but most Mindanaons know that this issue is far bigger and more important than President Arroyo. It defines themselves and their future. Please allow me to explain as briefly and as candidly as possible:

A) History -

1. The concept of the Philippines as a state is a colonial creation. The Philippines, under its present borders, never existed in pre-colonial times. Visayans had their own language and culture, apart from Luzon. Mindanao was more closely linked, culturally and linguistically, to Borneo and her southern neighbors. The borders of the Philippine archipelago were created by the Spanish colonizers. Taiwan and Palau may have even been included, had they not been ceded or sold to other colonial powers. The Philippines is an artificial state, composed of several ethnic groups or nations that were lumped together by colonial powers. Because there is no inherent bonding between the major ethnic groups, there will be an increasing tendency towards partition.

2. The name, “Philippines”, is an insult. It brands the country as the legacy of a colonial monarch. It suggests vassalage and obeisance. No wonder that Muslims, who were never subjugated by the colonizers, find the appellations “Filipino” or “Pilipino” degrading.

3. The excessive centralization of power and wealth in Manila is a colonial legacy. Spanish colonizers, lacking funds and manpower, found it more convenient to rule the archipelago from a central seat of power. The islands were left to fend for themselves with token support, battling marauders and disease, while still remitting produce and tribute to the central government. This concept was continued by the Americans and, upon independence, appropriated by Manila’s elite. External colonization was replaced by internal colonization. Mindanao suffered the most from this historical injustice. Landless peasants from Luzon and Visayas were dispatched to Mindanao to take land from the natives. Political cronies were granted vast logging concessions, indiscriminately cutting down huge forest reserves. Multinationals set up large plantations in the island, paying their taxes and duties to the central government. Mindanao was seen as a convenient source of food, raw materials and export dollars. And a captive market for Manila’s factories and business enterprises. Colonialism was supposed to be an anachronism. But it exists in modern-day Philippines via an overcentralized structure of government which concentrates power, wealth and privelege on only one region. This unjust and discredited system is what makes secession so appealing.

B) Economics -

1. Years of corruption and mismanagement have brought the Philippines into severe economic distress. It is saddled with a tremendous debt burden that barely enables government to keep operating. It can only survive if it keeps on borrowing, sinking it further into debt. It is a vicious cycle at best, spinning uncontrollably towards disaster. When the central government is unable to satisfy the most basic demands of the regions, dissatisfaction turns into mutiny. This is beginning to happen. It can only deteriorate further. Economic fall-out leads to disintegration. Not even the once-mighty Soviet Union could prevent itself from breaking up after its resources were strained by the cold war.

2. Regions like Mindanao are self-sufficient, with economically sound fundamentals. Food is not a problem and agricultural exports can provide much-needed dollars. Resources for energy and power are available. Mindanao will not only survive by seceding from the central government, it will flourish.

3. Mindanao needs to conserve and maximize her resources. After her forests were denuded, with nothing to show for it, measures like the Mining Act threaten to deplete mineral resources, with little compensation. While investments in mining are encouraged, there must be sufficient revenue to compensate Mindanao for the loss of resources.

4. Secession is a way out of bondage to the national debt. Mindanao will not have to totally renounce debt, but it can demand for a fair accounting of its share. Mindanao’s debt load will surely be disproportionately smaller than the rest of the country’s. After all, Mindanao had nothing to do with white elephants like the mothballed nuclear plant and the behest loans of Presidential cronies. Liberation from debt is, by itself, enough impetus for Mindanaons to demand independence. They will free their children and grandchildren from being indentured to poverty. There will be hope instead of despair.

In trying to be brief, I cite only some of the reasons why Mindanao will someday achieve independence. These reasons are based on sober observations of the past and the present. The objective and logical conclusion is that Mindanao will be much better off if it breaks away from the Philippine Republic. The Left, most notably the National Democratic Front, will denounce my assessment. But they have another agenda, which has nothing to do with hope and upliftment, and everything to do with imposing a foreign ideology which will not flourish in an independent, prosperous Mindanao. The Right, especially the neo-colonialists from Manila, will deplore the loss of a convenient milking cow that a subservient Mindanao represents. However, to the average Mindanaon, the question now is no longer, “Can we afford to be independent?” but,  “Can we afford not to be independent?”.

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely yours,
Erineo Cabahug
Nell Ave., Bronx
N.Y. 10462

In Mr. Manuel L. Quezon III’s article entitled “Sixth Republic” (7/28/05), he proposed a form of govenrment that is for me the most viable form for our country. What he did was to look back in our country’s cultural and political history and at the same time assumed preferred future outcomes in order to craft his own form of government, unlike with our present politicians who gives great preferences to the form of government of other countries which they perceived would make our nation progress because the country which they would pattern our form of government is also progressive. I believe that way of thinking is wrong because culturally and politically, they differ from us (or our country for that matter). Culturally, we like to elect a single leader, and politically, our politicians would like to have powers/reponsibilities that are solely theirs. Because of that, I subscribe to Mr. Quezon’s proposed form of government. We must look within ourselves what we really want by refering to our nation’s historical tendnecies. I hope our politicians would read his article and do the same thing also in order to make a Win-Win situation for our nation.
Drey Alenjano
Caloocan City

I was glad to read Manuel L. Quezon III’s column titled- The Sixth Republic.

All along, I thought that I was the only person (I knew) that believed in the merits of a Federal BUT Presidential form of government, as well as using Run-Off Elections to obtain a Majority vote.

Likewise, in todays paper, even other politicians are talking about a Presidential-Federal form of government, in order to convince the Senators and presidential aspirants to agree to dance the Cha-Cha.

All this of course is only possible if GMA and Noli Boy resigns and lets the Senate President call new elections. Only then will everyone agree to focus on Charter Change which will hopefully lead to the strengthening of our institutions and result in progress for our country and people.

MLQuezon III presented clear cut and logical arguments that are simple to understand (perhaps so many of our congressmen and senators can understand its merits – thank you MLQ III).

Truly, as many people have advocated, the Federal system of government is something long overdue.

But, with all the perils of a Parliamentary system (What perils? Take a look at Joe de V., Remember the Davide Impeachment etc. etc.. ) where majority of Filipinos mistrust our current crop of Congressmen, as well as our nation’s history with the Presidential form, a Pres-Fed form makes more sense indeed.

Run-Off Elections,  used even by a relatively “poor” country like Indonesia in their recent elections after re-acquring democracy disproves the arguments that it is too costly for a “poor” country like the Philippines.

What a wonderful dream – a Federal Republic where our brothers in the provinces need not get mad at “imperialist” Manila, where Muslim and Christian regions get autonomous authority over their territories and wealth, a Senate elected by region wherein all provinces in LuzViMin gets equal representation and where senators get limited powers involving only national concerns. A majority elected President ( via Run -Off Elections) with reduced powers who gets to work hand in hand with a Lower House that elects a Prime Minister who heads the cabinet composed of honorable congressmen.

What a Wonderful Dream.
Alan D. R.de Luzuriaga

August

Dear Mr. Quezon,

Thank you for the kind words on the Blueprint for a Viable Philippines in your yesterday’s column in the Inquirer.  You hit the nail on the
head when you said that we approached the matter “with open minds, reasonable but firm convictions, a willingness to discuss instead of
dictate.”

The Blueprint remains a work in progress.  In fact, even as I write this note, we are in receipt of a number of comments, suggestions and
recommendations that may ultimately find its way into a revised 2nd edition.

It may even be said that none of the project proponents, including myself, are completely happy with the output having, in the past,
publicly adopted more “radical” positions.  But as we were guided by the viability objective, we could not simply impose our own wishes.

Now that the Blueprint is in circulation, I am sure that we will find ourselves engaged in “dangerous flirtation” with a variety of sections
of our population.  That is unavoidable.  The endorsement by President Estrada was welcomed by us.  We are sorry that you view this as possibly diminishing the value of its contents.

Our hope is that the Blueprint will be received by others in the same light that you did.

Sincerely,
Renato Constantino, Jr.

My dear Quezon,

It is a matter of great import about which I write you today. As the grandchild of a big-P-politician you know that things here are not right.

It took a great intellectual like Trotsky to think Russia into change, slightly bloody but none the less a change.

I am trying to float among the intellectuals I can reach, one workable solution for our “change”.

I am sure you appreciate, that, except for a miracle, no meaningful change is possible under the present Nepotism. „They‰ are all in it together and they are „all powerful‰.

Now is the time for the intelligentsia to make a stand.

Your columns are often political, and maybe the time has come to discuss one possible solution to our problems. The alternative may be the ultimate „Bloody revolution‰ which this entrenched Dynasty will eventually spin off.

2005 forward has no historical or social precedents to look back on. This is a changed world.

These are far more critical times for the Filipinos than any of us can foresee. 84 million people, over half under 15 years old, Oil prices slated to reach $100, over half the adult population unemployed, or underemployed, and all, underpaid. (Unemployment is not the 8% quoted).

The status quo’s hidden danger is that the top 10% always make sure that they get their share first. We have tremendous pressures about to build up.

In today‚s Inquirer the US has all but admitted it has lost the Iraq war, and holds out no future for Iraq. The US can no longer fund its disasters. Israel has just made its first withdrawal, after 40 years of denial, because it has almost lost its war. I suspect that the US has stopped funding them as well.

The Philippines is one of the last cripples sucking on the American teat and the plug could be pulled anytime. If Iran goes sideways the American milk will dry up for all its sucklings

Meanwhile, this present political fiasco is being played out in Manila, which has now become an island of unreality.

Velvet revolutions do not just happen, and especially in a country with 500 years of entrenched Nepotism. God has had 500 years to fix it. Maybe it is time to help him a bit.  God does not need to help those who help themselves.

Change of the present Dynasty is an intellectual impossibility, so we now have to use the only tools we have, in order to get the change we need.

If we ever managed to create a real and functional Federal Parliamentary Democracy, (FPD) all our troubles would soon end. FPD is a profound system which really can self correct if run honestly.

Today‚s Editorial in the Inquirer had a harsh look at the Media. The problems far exceeds even these perceptions.

I have not seen even one Journalist address the realities of our Big P Politics. They are all hung up on the small Œp‚ smoke screens. They all keep our focus on the second-tier of puppets, namely the President and the Senate. None dares to define where the Philippines‚s problems really lie.

Lets talk Cha-cha.

I can state categorically and pray that the country proves be wrong, that nobody who is not acculturated in a Western Democracy can know which forks to take on the long road to a functioning Federal Parliamentary Democracy. Too many bad turns and we are back where we started.

In our hope for a simple painless change, we all gloss over some of the more dramatic things which are needed to guarantee that real change succeeds. The most dramatic permanent-changes are well remembered, namely;

The French, had six cycles of the revolutionary guillotine before they had rooted out the bad apples.

Stalin had to kill 40 million of his fellows to make sure none could revert to the old ways

Mao, they now say did-in 70 million. Even then he had to make his new cultural generation destroy anybody who was educated or who still remembered the „old ways‰

Trotsky‚s concept of „permanent revolution‚ has been the only sanity that has ever been uttered in politics. Corruption follows election like night follows day.

The Philippines has not the slightest idea of what confusion, pain and suffering will follow, if they actually manage to get real change, (which would be more than a miracle under the present circumstances). Even at best there are winners and losers. This week‚s Israeli-settler riots show what even the best of patriotic people do when a government tries to guarantee their future.

If we, as a people, are sincere about change, we had better beat „them‰ at their own game. We must use “their” second tier of puppets to the people‚s advantage.

The time has come for the Media to change course. So Far the Media has tried to project its image of investigative journalism. It desperately seeks justification as being ” relevant” to the people.
It is time for the Media, as an institution, to stand up and be counted. Failure would be unconscionable

We are playing into the hands the oppressors when we accept the incumbent politician‚s arguments as the starting point for change. The Media is just rolling over at each political stupidity.

Divide and Rule, Confuse and Rule, Deny, Deny, Confuse, Obfuscate.

These are the constant messages reported by the Media. NEVER addressing the underlying motives, or ridiculing the clowns. The Media truly believe that they are merely reporting both sides of events. It is not a coincidence that the media always seem call on the traditional pundits, interview the vested interests.

Even at this very early stage the “Philippine-tragedy” is playing itself out. We are all rolling-over and talking about accepting/ rejecting /changing/arguing etc., „Their‰ proposed Systems.

By now we all know instinctively that whatever „they‰ want to give us, is for Œthem‚ not for us. It is an intellectual crime to even discuss „their‰ system.

If „we‰ (The intellectuals, teachers, employers and the Pulpit), do not pre-define the options which they want to offer us, we are already doomed. “Government by the people, for the people”, they should be saying.

An enlightened, foreword looking, and creative Media is the last hope of the Philippines.

You may have noticed how the American Press and Media (What a coincidence that two Capitalist Moguls own the entire American Media) dictate American foreign policy. Influence local policy. They start with a small back pager on say Darfur, then slowly escalate it until we are seeing dying babies and raped women on all the lead stories. Finally, the President somehow decides he must do something.

Because an American President does not know what is happening outside his own toilet, let alone actually know where say, Darfur is, they soon placate the‰ Public‰. (In reality the vested interests of the Media Moguls, who then feed money back to the Party).  Finally the US takes some inappropriate action.

Somalia, Sudan, Liberia, Libya, Haiti, Granada , Iraq, and the list of American screw-ups is endless.

Now let‚s get to Philippine screw-ups, not past, but future ones.

The present Media, if it is not already captive to the entrenched Dynasty, can still be an ally of the people, and counter the 15 Name families and the Catholic Church, whose politicians in turn control the destiny of this country.

Journalists and columnists need to see that more is needed from them than just reporting the status-quo.

All the way from  Plaridel, nearly two hundred years ago, the same old status-quo has dutifully been reported.  So far the Media‚s contribution has not produced much change for the „people‰ whom it claims to represent. Maybe the Publishers are already in the pockets of the ruling class.

Our three stooges, G, FVR, and De V. are already waffling, obfuscating and fudging as to what kind of system „they‰ will give us. They are using words like Federal, and then pronouncing that unlike other Federal systems, our Judiciary will not be placed under the Parliament.

Our incumbent politicians have not the slightest idea what A Federal Parliamentary Democracy is, and have even less chance of making their version anything but a joke.

The concept of using the enemy‚s strength against itself is well known. This present crisis is probably the last peaceful chance that the „people‰ will have of changing the system.

I see only one way to beat them with their own weapons.

We must DEMAND a change into the federal system but to OUR federal system. Every single journalist should start uniting all the educated and the intelligent people. (Not the ruling class who will resist change unto death).  We have to teach all Filipinos to do their homework. We need to publish, lecture, and shout out loud, our PRE-DEFINED Federal system, which we CAN make work.

We have to implement a grass roots education about Real Federalism, which would then become unstoppable by any Government. We will leave the Nepotists no room to dodge what is required.

We have to be at it day after day, week after week, month after month, on all the air-waves and papers, from all the pulpits, from all positions held by intelligent people, we must spread the word on how it should work, and where the gremlins are to be found.

We have to make sure that everybody, down to the least educated, has been told how it works, and what to do when they find it otherwise.

Just as America eventually does what the Media advocates, just so, if the rules and functions of a workable  Democratic Federal Parliamentary system are spelled out at every opportunity, there is a 50-50 chance that so many people will know what is expected, that the old hacks will have nowhere to hide.

If we, the intelligent, can not unite at the most critical point in the history of the Philippines, and come up with a workable system, we deserve everything that „they„ foist upon us.

If the Media was firing even on one cylinder, a ‰people-understood‰ federal system would be Hyped and pushed for all it was worth, so that it would have to be instituted, and more importantly in a way in which we can make it work in spite of „them‰.

The Media should be discussing it endlessly, explaining the workings of all the structures and lines of communication. Discuss who is answerable to whom.  How we can control that power, how to spot the Creeping-Cancer and eradicate it.

Spell out what is expected from the people. How they can control their own condition through their own system.

The Media should start spelling out the money trails, and where they should lead to. How much left the treasury and how much arrived at the destination. How it should be accounted for. Define who is watching whom. How the Feds watch the provinces, how the provinces have to answer to the Feds.

The Media, teachers, employers, and Clergy will already have de-facto „created‰ it, so it should work. The marketing community spare no effort in selling us Coke and Mc Donalds. Surely the future of a country is of equal importance.

In my opinion this present political farce is the „last train‰ and truly a godsend for us to take Dysfunctional Government out of the hands of the 15 Name families, the Church, and the present bunch of political crooks.

The ruling class have become so interbred that they cannot see that a good FPD will make them even richer and more powerful

The Media collectively if they fail in such a quest will have doomed us to another 50 years of failure.

I can confidently say that if Œthey‚ give us ‚their‚ Cha-Cha, it will end up more dysfunctional than in our worst nightmare and more money wasting than anything so far in our history

This could well spin off only other solution of violent revolution, fortunately  that time is not right yet.

Regards
Graham Reinders

Hello Manuel:

I enjoyed reading your article. Interesting that a man in the Philippines can write an article that is instantly read and appreciated by a man in Idaho USA.

Your article about Japan really speaks to the plight of all of us. Enemies of 1941 are now allies and allies are now enemies in 2005. I use the word “allies” very loosely because in reality there are no real allies today. I am ignorant about the Philippines except to remember that American military bases were closed by Philippino invitation soon after the Marcos scandal. At the risk of being insulting…the Philippines is not in the conciousness of average Americans. Fellow Americans regard my own home state of Idaho as a “nowhere” place and jokingly confuse it with the state of Iowa. As I said…no insult intended.

Japan is the World’s second largest economy after the USA but has no Nukes, no seat on the UN Security Council, and no real defense against little North Korea and big China. In fact…China can take over the whole of Asia…including the Philippines…if it decides to. America no longer has the Testosterone to get into a shooting war with China. Three decades of Women’s Liberation has robbed the USA of it’s testicles. The Phillipines and everybody else is in reality “on their own” when it comes to Islamic or China aggression. Good luck!

Ironic that 2005 technology can instantly connect Manuel to a man in Idaho USA…but cannot improve the “relationship” between their governments.

Regards,
Book Adams

The following questions have been bothering me for quite some time now. I hope you could enlighten me.

What makes the Civil Society (the likes of Dinky Soliman, Garchitorena, et. al.) “civil”? What makes them different from Philippine society in general? Is this a group? Are they really interested in “helping” the country or are they just a bunch of “intellectuals” who would like to satisfy their intellectual and political curiosity? Why does the government pay so much attention, or appears to be beholden, to this seemingly exclusive group? Why do they have to appropriate to themselves the term “civil”? Does it mean that the rest of Filipinos are not “civil”?

Honestly, everytime I hear this term over the radio or in TV, and when I hear it refers only to a couple of individuals, I feel like insulted and at the same time confused. I feel like, “Hey, am I not civil in this society? Am I not civil if I am not part of these people?”

I hope you won’t mind answering my questions. Thank you very much in advance.
Mr. Kjell Daren Aboy
Obrero, Davao City

September

What makes Mr Quezon think that Ms Soliman was telling the truth?
I cannot believe he takes her words without any question. That’s poor journalism.
Arfeo Sescon
Bakersfield, Ca USA

The minority are just spoiled brats gone into tantrums not being able to get their toys.
jesse yu
genluna iloilo

Please commend abovementioned author for his unique literary style in “Unity Is the Only Choice.” But please also reprimand him for me for the erroneous substance of his piece which, among other things said that GMA is in the position of woman accused of adultery.” If she the accused, why condemn her as guilty already based on perception and before all the evidence are heard in court.  Since the rule of law says she may be impeached only in accordance with law, but the required 79 votes cannot be obtained by the opposition/pro impeachment solons, then wait for the time when she can be accused in court: after she ceases to be President or when she finishes her term, whichever comes first.  Do not rush to judgment, based on what was once said, “kill me but hear me first.” The truth is every politician tries to win an election, and cheating lin the last elections may have been committed by both sides.  What is paramount is that she is the only economist President who is urgently needed to solve the economic ills of the country, brought about the previous Presidents, beginning with the late Ferdinand Marcos.  And the lack of warm bodies to hold big demonstrations as you want it impliedly in “Unity Is the Only Choice,” means there is acquiescence of the people that she be given the chance to solve the problems of the country now.
paul soriano
Houston, TX

One of the best things about working for the Inquirer is getting to read my favorite columnists’ latest pieces even before they’re published. Thank you for the breath of fresh air that was (is?) “How baboy naman they are.”
This, like Sheila Coronel’s “Elocution 101″ on the PCIJ blog, shows how potent humor can be when used in a critique of politics and society.

While you admitted that some anecdotes were exaggerated, I believe they’re closer to the truth than you think. The aborted impeachment case is starting to resemble Edsa 3 more than it does Edsa 2. I say this because
there is the fear that all of this struggle will amount to nothing except a few more weeks’ glaring headlines and further polarization. I hope with all my middle-class heart that I will be proven wrong.
Jaime Alarcon

Nice try, Mr. Manuel L. Quezon III to portray, tongue-in-cheek, those who are not with the opposition as a bunch of bratty, insensitive, class-bigoted bunch. I hope that once, even just once, in you mind, you also saw those same characteristics (that you contextualized in detail), attitudes, and perspectives that this bratty class are exhuding from aong the ranks of the opposition
Bart Cristofori
Palana St. Makati City

Dear Mr. Quezon:

Re “To our worthy bishops” (your column, Sept. 11, 2005):

This has to be one of your finest pieces. It’s beautifully articulated, sober and highly informed of Catholic theological, spiritual and social teachings. I look forward to reading more of your articles/essays in your column.

Sincerely,
Eugenio A. Pulmano, MD
NJ, USA

from one who has not particular affection for erap the president, i have always been an avid fan of the proposition that his was an undeserved expulsion from his office. it has been clear to me, then as now, that what drove him out was the sheer intellectual elitism of our youth, my generation included. I am glad that your exposition in this article serves as means to make amends. for truthfully, we have inherited much strife by our previous actions. and we could have done it over again, perhaps, we would have been wiser.
xc aragon marin
UP village, diliman, qc

We believe that pound for pound, Pressident Estrada was a better president than Gloria. Remnants of the civil (evil) society cannot accept the fact and reality that Gloria was a failure. They endorsed her to illegally replcae Estrada but no they cannot truly accept that she is worse than Erap. The elite and the civil society are cheating themselves and are being “plastic” or hypocrites by insisting that they made the right decision and still are when they endorsed GMA. We agree with Manuel Quezon III with what he said in his column of September 19 The Long View.
dante solisor
Bahaytoro, Quezon City

October

Mr. Quezon is right. I wondered if I was the only one who watched Fox News…I remember post-911, when this Michelle Malkin went on and on about fighting the terrorist and closing the borders to immigrants. Near the end of the show, the interviewer asked why she didn’t look white, that she looked like an immigrant. After hemming and hawing, Malkin finally said in a soft voice that she came from the Philippines “years ago.” Talk about hypocrisy! She’s an immigrant, but wants to make the door smaller for other immigrants. Then she went on about her book which I don’t think people here would read. She’s what the Americans call a “brown-noser.” What we call “sipsip” over here. Now she’s spouting rhetoric about profiling??? Even the whites do not want to be seen talking about profiling…yet we see this “sipsip” clamoring for it! Something’s wrong with this Malkin. Nasa Amerika lang siya, akala niya duon na ang pinagmulan niya, itinatatwa na niya ang pagka-Pinoy sa katauhan niya, at gusto niyang yurakan ang ibang mga Pilipino, dito man sa Pilipinas o sa Amerika. Michelle Malkin is a disgrace to the Filipinos. She should be declared a persona non grata.
Mike
Taft Avenue

Dear Nonong,

Agree ako sa isang column mo last month na siguro napapanahon na magbago ng pamamaraan ng pagluklok ng mga pinuno sa LGU.
Dahil dito, nangahas akong ilahad sa iyo ang isang panukalang binalangkas ko ilang taon na ang nakararaan at sinikap na ipabatid sa ilang pulitiko. Sa kasamaang palad, tila walang ibig pumatol. Kung inaakala mong may kabuluhan itong panukalang ito, sana pamunuan mo ang paghahatid ng mensahe sa mga pulitiko natin. Siguro pwede mo na ring ipabatid ito sa binuo ni GMA na consultative commission (kahit mukhang malabong may kahihinatnan ang kanilang gagawin).

Maraming Salamat
Gener de Guzman

Congrats on your “Scorched-earth governance”. You hit the nail on the head.

Enclosed is a Comment – “GUANTANAMO PROVISION” LACKING. The Anti-Terror Bill amends radically the Revised Penal Code and the Bill of Rights of the 1987 Constitution, even without CHA-CHA.

Incidentally, I was born in a coastal town of Quezon, and studied at the MLQ University. More power to you.

“GUANTANAMO PROVISION” LACKING

The Anti-Terror Bill, languishing at the House of Representatives for years, is now passed by the committees on Justice and Foreign Affairs with flying colors! The nation can rest in peace.

By that bold stroke, the patriots in our Congress have surpassed those of the United States. Some bearers of the red flags in our country are mistaken in thinking that we could not go beyond the intensity of the US Patriot Act, similar legislations in Britain and Australia, or even the UN Security Council resolution on this issue.

Again in that one bold stroke, we have fast-tracked the “CHA-CHA”. Just take a quick glance over the Anti-Terror Bill; it has taken away not less than half of the provisions of the Bill of Rights. Most of the human rights guidelines were set aside. Gone are the contentious provisions, say, in Article III, Sec. 1 on “life, liberty or property”; Sec. 2 on “searches and seizures”; Sec. 3 on “privacy of communications and correspondence”; Sec. 4 on “freedom of speech and expression” and “peaceful assembly”. Binay would no longer be busy granting permits on rallies; Atienza would no longer bother himself denying them.

Dean Agabin of Lyceum says that the bill suffers “not only in ambiguity but also in overbreadth”. What is wrong with that? Is it not time to make another radical revision of the Revised Penal Code – legacy from Spain, which borrowed it perhaps from the Romans? Let us give each offense its maximum penalty. Now is the time for people of guts, like the Arroyos, the Gonzales, and others of their persuasion to reassert themselves.

And the bill is unique. Look at that provision which punishes acts committed against the criminal laws of the United States. Who says we are not grateful to a Motherland, even if it contradicts the most basic principle that criminal laws are only territorial?

The Anti-Terror Bill is almost perfect. What is missing is the “Guantanamo Provision”. Where do we keep those to be arrested without warrants, and punished, under this magnificent law? We do not suggest Iwahig, but we prefer a secluded island – not subject to international law and immune from justice, light or hope.
NELSON D. LAVINA

Your column in the Inquirer is one of the few that make sense these days. Thank you for voicing out all the frustrations we have about the fantastically insensitive and idiotic people in government who continue to pretend they care for their country. I am much saddened by the general governmental decline and I hope more people would care enough to listen to voices of reason, like yours. I was hoping to share with you some today something from the great Bertolt Brecht, which succinctly describes the frustration people have for the rulers we have -\”Those who take the most from the table, teach contentment. Those for whom the taxes are destined, demand sacrifice. Those who eat their fill, speak to the hungry, of wonderful times to come. Those who lead the country into the abyss, call ruling difficult, for ordinary folk.\”

Please keep on writing for all of us, especially for those who couldn\’t be bothered to care about this country.
karen p. ocampo
makati

Dear Mr. Quezon,

Greetings and may this letter reaches you in good spirits.

I’ve been meaning to write you since seeing your website last week in the hope of  engaging you in an exchange about the country of our birth.

That said let me begin by saying it troubles me deeply each time I read news articles, which only serves as a reminder that incompetence and ignorance rules the Philippines.

It seems our country of birth, since its so-called independence has succeeded only in making itself irrelevant in global affairs, it is rarely mentioned in the news except in instances where the topics of poverty, human degradation are discuseed. Or more recently about how subservient the government has become one wonders what definition of pride there is to talk about?

As someone who embraces the notion that all humans are the same, it is a bedeviling reminder to read about countries from SEA and SA being the countries of choice by many here in the west for medical operations and the likes while the Philippine is mentioned only for its most often exploited non skilled laborers abroad.

Knowing a majority of them in fact are college graduates, would you not agree their employment as maids and in other low-wage jobs is an indictment of the quality of education in the Philippines?

That the so-called “elite” institutions of learning seem oblivious or ignorant of this image and perception by the rest of the world is to me further evidence of that failure.

Which brings me to the current issue about to be debated in the Philippines for the numerous questions it provokes such as: what exactly is a Federal – Parliamentary form of government?  Whose or which definition would or should be used and why?

In fact what makes that concept more suitable to the political landscape it should replace the current system?

Does it not share the same risks of failure as the one it is intending to replace?

What advantages to the general population or the country does it offer that the current system does not or could not?

Just as important, who will debate and ultimately determine the merits and demerits of the proposition?  And what expertise do they bring to the debate that will give merit and credibility to their arguments?

Would English be the language of use? If so why?  And what standards of proficiency should those involved in the process, posses, to ensure they can fully articulate and understand the nuances and subtleties of the system’s complexities?  And if there’s none shouldn’t there be one?

How does the use of the English language relate to a people whose proficiency is undoubtedly much less and in whose name the change is being made?

Or put another way do the Philippines exercise the rule of law or is it more like the rule by law, which is another way of asking; is the Philippines a Republic and do the people enjoy real democracy or is it more like feudalism and plutocracy?

For a government who has no appreciable interest in the political demands of sovereignty or for that matter genuine national pride (read: US: RP worse off under Castro; US profiles rising Filipino leaders; 2 Govt. officials defend De Castro, articles published by the Philippine Inquirer; blatant examples of foreign intervention in the country’s internal affairs) is it not fair to ask if the government really knows what its talking about or worse, what it is doing?

Are our public officials just plain naïve, ignorant or both about the meaning of national sovereignty they hardly know when it requires defending?

And therein I think, lay the dilemma. We in general are ill informed as a country because our understanding of the English language is so basic as to provide us with helpful guidance on the world around us.

There is for instance the seeming belief that ignorance is bliss, believing God will eventually provide. And that being respectful and obedient is one and the same.

Since being good is right and being obedient is good, independence of mind is not encouraged to the detriment of societal growth among other things.

With a people more focused on being good, one has to ask how helpful that can be to democracy, recognizing the competing dynamics of power in government made more complex by our capitalistic system and the failure the institutions of learning to provide quality education enough to truly educate?

Moreover there is the seeming failure to grasp that justice cannot be realized if dispensed at the whim of a single individual who acts as judge and jury. For that system invites corruption and a corrupt justice system corrupts absolutely.

But despite this source of inequity no one, from the government to the so-called “elite” institutions of learning is talking about the need to replace it with something that would at a minimum create stability and perception of fairness.

May I say I make all these criticisms, mindful of the analogy that in the search for a cure one first need to determine the illness.

And the illness as I see it has nothing whatsoever to do with our current system of government. Rather the root of our problem rests at the absence of a basic tool to with which we could communicate effectively and comprehensively with each other in the most meaningful way.

But I am getting way ahead of myself so I will end here and hope that you will favor me with your thoughts about the commentaries I gave.

Take care and I look forward to hearing from you.
Bonifacio Sioson
East Haven, CT.

November

I was so glad you wrote about that article… It also happens on SMART WiFi’s DSL Broadband service. I was also experiencing that kind of ‘quality’ service for TWO WEEKS I can’t believe that my speed was like a 56k dial up modem… and of course by the time they respond it was okay.. (after sending follow-up with these guys called “Customer Care”) I think they got the problem fixed before they called me to make me look like an idiot.. I was calling their tech support and no one is answering(It was on a weekday.. But they called me up Sunday evening ##@@!)
zaldy esteban
Makati City

i’m so glad to read that article commenting on pldt’s poor service. we were once using pldt dsl too but we switched to globelines for a year now. there’s a difference in speed but at least customer service is good! and i must add, friendly. it is just so sad to know that a company so admired by many as one of asia’s well-managed companies can have such poor customer service. they do not realize that it’s actually cheaper to ensure customers remain loyal through good services and goods than to attract new customers through advertising. i admire you’re courage for writing against a huge entity such as pldt. and that pldt-airline dsl-aircraft pairing i found really amusing! God bless you and this country!
Karl Satinitigan
greenhills east, mandaluyong city

Dear Sir:

I got the chance to read your article today in the Arab News as captioned above with so much awe and admiration. Never imagined that  there are still decent people like you who could so vividly picture in print the actual state of our beloved nation and the exact behaviour & plight of the OFWs. And all you needed was just a small piece of paper. It is not worth mentioning  the monotony of seeing these TV sitcoms on TFC  who dwell on
political issues & subjects without end. They go round the bush like headless chickens if you may allow me to say so!

I was deeply touched as me and my family belong to the other half who have opted not to fight for crumbs, a very difficult option indeed to say the least.. Thank you and more power for the enlightenment of those who belong to the “selfish, stupid, short-sighted and greedy political  culture” of our society.
Armando U. Tadique
Accountant
AYTB, KSA

December

Regarding Mr. Quezon’s rather lame analogy equating Commissioner Garcillano’s reasoning with St. Paul’s definition of truth–please refrain from making any more criminally ludricrous comparisons. Since when is Gospel truth the same as a lie? Please let’s not confuse the reader even more with one’s personal biases against St. Paul or even the Christian faith. That’s another thing altogether. Stick to what you know best and can verify–how about a relative truth against an absolute one? Thanks.
Susan Tan
Illinois, USA

Good  Morning Manny &  Merry Christmas to you & your family.

I hope you’re doing great & fine today.

I do apprecaite your column which I read from a forwarded email entitled ” MARCOS HIERS PROVE INCAPABLE OF LEADERSHIP”.

Also,  I have watch your commentaries especially with the interviews you have in the ABS CBN News Channel  thru TFC here in  the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Your anaylsis are quite consistently true & correct.  There  has has been a missing link that our countrymen looking for in the name of  “Leadership”.

But allow me also to share to you my personal essay which I made before all the Arroyo administration issues & controversy has come out in June 2005.

Sometimes  if you will look at the more broadest perspective  it seems to be that our country has missed a “Unifying factor”.  Still,  the destiny of our country is in the “Hands of GOD”.

Even yourself I believed would have a great contribution to our country later on.

Just keep up the best for our country rightnow because I believed that on  GOD’s proper time someone has been choosen to lead.

Best regards & GOD Bless.
ROMEL G. SOMO
Riyadh Saudi Arabia

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  1. Karl

    One question
    MlQ3
    What is your e-mail address so I don’t have to ramble unnecessarily

    is it malnuellquezon3@gmail.com?
    mlquezon3@gmail.com?
    I give up…

    There are things that I want to e-mail you that does not need to be seen in the comment threads

    I will make that a sort of new year’s resolution just to e-mail off topic comments

    pls e-mail me at the e-mail add that reflects on this comment

    Happy New Year!

  2. Karl

    MLQ3

    Forgot to thank you for allowing me some(some?)
    space in your comment threads starting third or fourth weeek of october 2005

    You are the first blog I visited and felt comfortable even if your spam guard or spam karma keeps on filtering some of my overly tactless comments..

    After editing and revamping comments some I mean most of my comments still get through and I thank you again…

  3. jhay

    good sir,

    thank you for visiting my blog and mentioning it in your today’s entry.

    I’m really fascinated with the ideas that Rizal was Hitler’s father, a very good story to tell my friends and i bet it would knock their socks off and to see how it happen would be a worthy blog entry.

    I’d still like to have my copy of “20 Speeches that Moved a Nation” autographed, but just like what you said when we met in La Salle Greenhills during the Bukluran’s press con, “Magkikita pa naman tayo ulit.” I am still looking forward to that day sir.

    The best of the new year to come!

  4. Karl

    I have experimented on both e-mails above and did not bounce back
    I had an idea of you e mail add because that message from inspector bout spam sent to me had you copy furnished I just was not able to write your e-mail add on a piece of paper before deleting the message….

    anyways my question which I was afraid to ask in this blog was this….

    I was watching PBA on ABC5 and I saw a trailer of Ali Sotto’s show and the topic was adoption and I was surprised to see you in the trailer where you even mentioned something about the importance of finding ones identity…

    i did not read the caption because I already know you but I saw in the succeeding guests Dr. Belo and Mayor Atienza a caption of their situation whether nag adopt o naadopt

    I hope this is not one of my tactless moments
    and I hope you reply either in this blog or through e-mail…

  5. Karl

    One e-mail add pala bounced back yung mas mahaba

  6. Karl

    Question about indifference

    is it the same as antipathy or apathy(are the two synonymous?)

    or in other words None of the above type of a fellow

    I maybe none of the above because I see two sides of the coin but does that make me ambiguous? i may not like GMa as a person because I already put imaginary horns and tails on her person but sometimes I believe her claim of resiliency and I believe some people when they say that she outfoxed the fox

  7. Karl

    bout rizal and Hitler

    kelan ba nag suicide si hitler 1945 let us say 60 sya nuon
    that would make him 1885 give or take a few years…
    just would not like to google to confirm just for the sake of argument….

    nung circa 1880s palipat lipat si Rizal at malay natin all it takes is 5 to ten minutes of pleasure(even less for some) to sire some one..pero nah

    no chinese or malay features
    or else he would not even have the gall to claim racial supremacy over the jews or any race for that matter…..

    Bout the chinese lack of naval power
    don’t you think that they are not using the decomissioned junk of the former USSR
    they even built a rocket and space shuttle from USSR discards..that is pure urban legend!

    That is why I am afraid of a Taiwanese Chinee war because it may happen when the Moslem christian cold war subsides or would be in an intermission period….

    Next question…Why are there so many Koreans mushrooming are they afraid of North Korea and think that the RP is way to far to feel the wrath of the North Korean Leader
    or is it that they wont miss TV because of the Korean Telenovelas and all they got to study is Tagalog to catch up..ala Sandara Parks…

    Bout the oil wars…
    what will happen when chinese and Indian consumes all the fossil fuels left with in the next 10 years…would there be another oil war in the making….. who is next?

  8. Karl

    Mlq It is me again I read this particular blog as your entire blog sissues little by little

    everytime I notice something like below want to give my 2 cents…

    Have you ever wondered why the adjective \’Nazi\’ is almost always used when describing Germany\’s acts during WWII, but no such similar qualifier is used when describing Italy\’s or Japan\’s actions during this period?

    It\’s the Nazis, not Germans, who waged WWII.Can we then say that is the neocons who waged the war in Iraq and not the Americans?
    Bdul Arana
    Davao

    Mr. Arana
    during WWII
    Italians are called fascists because of Mussolini
    and any similar deplorable attitudes today or maybe even by Yamashita and by certain leaders are called”fascist” …the Neo Nazis are just attributed to “skin heads “and the KKK Klu Klux not the katipunan

    and FYI the japs are still hated in China,Singapore and Taiwan
    just ask the Madrigals who got mistaken for japs during Koizumi’s visit to china

  9. Karl

    Rizal-related matters from Ambeth Ocampo, from Chris Antonette P. Pugay, from Augusto V. De Viana, and Margarita Ventenilla-Hamada, columnist Ellen Tordesillas.

    I read 2 collums Ocampo’s and tordesillas
    Would like to comment on Ocampo’s electic fan story

    The guy associated Rizal with the holy trinity….
    so Rizal Might be the Sugo after all…

    watching too many Mulawin and Sugo lahat tuloy ng messianic complex sugo na

    but Rizal never claimed to be the Messiah and wanted to shy away from a full blown revolution(correct me if wrong MLq3)

  10. Karl

    Bout the letter below which stated form the Philippines making itself irrelevant in global affairs, then questioning parliamntary federal…

    Concerning Global affairs Maybe JDV and FVR has not reached the reader from Connecticut..maybe he thinks our role in the UN security council is so irrelevant maybe what the reader rememberes is Angelo Dela cRuz and the pullout from Iraq etc…

    Bout Federal parliamentary The letter was in October sad to say only the COn COms so called Monumental blunder will be remembered if the reader decides to write and ask again bout the system of government..

    all mother comments of the reader I tend to agree

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>..
    Exerpt of Bonifacio Sioson
    East Haven, CT.

    It seems our country of birth, since its so-called independence has succeeded only in making itself irrelevant in global affairs, it is rarely mentioned in the news except in instances where the topics of poverty, human degradation are discuseed. Or more recently about how subservient the government has become one wonders what definition of pride there is to talk about?

    As someone who embraces the notion that all humans are the same, it is a bedeviling reminder to read about countries from SEA and SA being the countries of choice by many here in the west for medical operations and the likes while the Philippine is mentioned only for its most often exploited non skilled laborers abroad.

    Knowing a majority of them in fact are college graduates, would you not agree their employment as maids and in other low-wage jobs is an indictment of the quality of education in the Philippines?

    That the so-called “elite” institutions of learning seem oblivious or ignorant of this image and perception by the rest of the world is to me further evidence of that failure.

    Which brings me to the current issue about to be debated in the Philippines for the numerous questions it provokes such as: what exactly is a Federal – Parliamentary form of government? Whose or which definition would or should be used and why?

    In fact what makes that concept more suitable to the political landscape it should replace the current system?

  11. Karl

    Ayoko ko na po ….ako na lang yata ang nagcocomment lahat preparing for the New year!

    Happy new Year!

    See You next year!

    Promise konti na lang dahil me trabaho na ako as a property consultant in other words nagbebenta ng condo,house and lot,townhouse….

    mag start pa lang training next week
    baka makita nyo na lang ako sa mall namimigay ng flyer bout DMCI Homes projects..(can’t imagine myself doing that pero kung kailangan ..why not)

  12. Tiffany Brown

    ty rador you were there I think that is so cool!!!! I’m doing a report on the Philippines and I think I read that somewhere.

  13. jessica

    chines writing a-z

  14. Sesso

    Dirò ai miei amici circa questo luogo – perché realmente lo ho gradito! Ben cotto! =)

  15. B. Sioson

    Re this comment from KARL:

    “Bout the letter below which stated form the Philippines making itself irrelevant in global affairs, then questioning parliamntary federal…

    Concerning Global affairs Maybe JDV and FVR has not reached the reader from Connecticut..maybe he thinks our role in the UN security council is so irrelevant maybe what the reader rememberes is Angelo Dela cRuz and the pullout from Iraq etc…

    Bout Federal parliamentary The letter was in October sad to say only the COn COms so called Monumental blunder will be remembered if the reader decides to write and ask again bout the system of government..

    all mother comments of the reader I tend to agree”

    Hello Karl and thanks for taking the time to comment on my letter.

    As my understanding of your critique could be skewed given the somewhat ambiguous nature of your explanation, allow me at this time to apologize. Nothing personal of course.

    That being said, am I to infer from your argument that the previous membership of the Philippines in the UN Security Council is tangible proof of the country’s relevance in global affairs? If that were your basis, perhaps you can explain the Republic of Congo and Ghana’s current membership.

    It could certainly be argued that on the surface, occupying a seat on that council confers a certain amount of prestige and whatever else the country involve may wish to believe, but to take it further and ascribe more than the obvious (history) would in my view be an adventure into self-delusion.

    Nonetheless I stand corrected and welcome enlightenment.

    But before I change topic could you cite from your recollection an action or position taken by the Philippine government that mattered in international affairs that would lead you to conclude we are relevant players in geopolitics?

    In any case, according to Bulatlat Magazine (Nov. 2006) Filipino professionals in Canada ends up in low-paying jobs they’ve had to petition their government for redress >>

    Given how liberal the Canadian government is, compared to other developed countries one would certainly find that report astounding.

    Yet despite its liberalism, its view of the Filipinos quality of education (knowledge) and competency seems to suggest something dispiriting if not altogether deplorable.

    So would you agree with that observation and tell me as well, why do you think Canada has taken the position it has?

    Incidentally, do you remember that case of the woman raped by a US serviceman not very long ago? Whose pain and suffering was deemed to be only worth $2000 by the Filipino judge who presided over the case?

    Sitting from where I am, his judgment of what the woman’s pain and suffering is worth (synonymous to life and dignity in my opinion) seems to me a profound testament and definition of who and what we are as a people by the government, keeping in mind that the judge represents the Philippine government and by extension all of us Filipinos.

    But before I conclude let me ask a personal question. Have you ever engaged a beggar on the street or who you perceived to be in a lower economic level in a serious political discussion or sought his opinion on a critical subject?

    For now I will leave the issue of the proposed changed of the system of government and will look forward instead to your reply.

    Bonifacio (Oning) Sioson

  16. consuelo s. perez

    Mr. Ancelloti,
    Excuse me, my father the late Speaker Eugenio Perez Sr. was NOT a collaborator, he was deep into the resistance movement against the Japanese .
    Consuelo s. Perez
    lawyer
    deputy commissioner
    cict-op

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